EARLY COMMITMENTS RAISE CONCERNS - Baseball America Cahill

my take since I have a 15 yr old and have thought about it.     I can see a UC SB or Texas State coach complain because no 14 or 15 yr old says my dream school is Tx ST or Lamar.   Just very rare,  unless you have a connection with the coach and thats what its about frankly.    Im going to assume most kids grow up dreaming about playing for a perennial pwr.   Texas,  A&M,  LSU,  Vandy.   If your son is good enough to get offered by a program like that as a 2021 or 2020 I think more times than not its going to work out.    you have to go into making a commitment knowing there will be competition and working hard and getting better is still going to happen because you won't see the field in college if you dont keep up.   

I honestly think it is much ado about nothing.

unless they change when NLI's can be signed, it really doesn't matter much

early commits can be backed out of.  If you are Power Five talent, there'll be a spot for you after your Junior year of HS.  If you aren't, you weren't gonna get on the playing field at a Power 5 regardless of when you commit.

When I see a kid like Jarred Kelenic sign his NLI to Louisville, everybody knows he's going straight to pro ball anyways....

The whole concept of it potentially being "too late" if you don't commit to your dream school early, is just ridiculous.  Too late for what?  Sitting the bench and transferring after freshman year?

File this under: finding the right fit.

If you really believe that a Power 5 coach is going to pass on a true impact player for his program just because the kid doesn't commit until Junior or Senior year, I've got a bridge in Brooklyn to sell you...I mean c'mon, don't be so gullible,it just means that player number 35 on the roster gets forced out, or a lesser player gets de-committed.

Just remember, until the NLI is signed, everything is in play.

of note since I follow Texas,   they signed 2 kids  in June this summer for the 2018 class  after they realized the draft was going to hurt them more than they expected.   So to your point there are spots if you are talented.    Noah Syndergaard was a late bloomer  and funny thing is he got drafted in 1st round and wasnt holding any pwr 5 offers.  

gunner34 posted:

my take since I have a 15 yr old and have thought about it.     I can see a UC SB or Texas State coach complain because no 14 or 15 yr old says my dream school is Tx ST or Lamar.   Just very rare,  unless you have a connection with the coach and thats what its about frankly.    Im going to assume most kids grow up dreaming about playing for a perennial pwr.   Texas,  A&M,  LSU,  Vandy.   If your son is good enough to get offered by a program like that as a 2021 or 2020 I think more times than not its going to work out.    you have to go into making a commitment knowing there will be competition and working hard and getting better is still going to happen because you won't see the field in college if you dont keep up.   

Wait..you don't think Texas St or Lamar are dream schools?  

old_school posted:

Arkansaw...25, 12 and 6 LOL apparently things are gonna be changing there!

Arkansas usually has a large number of transfers out after freshman season. The true worrisome stat for the 2018 class is that they have no top 100 players. So, unlike a program like Vandy, they probably don't lose any lot to the draft.

not going to argue the merits of Texas St  I agree a solid option,   I just dont think it would categorize as a dream school but that will change a lot if you are a jr and that's your sole interest from div 1 schools.      LSU looks methodical same with Miss St  and for that matter Texas Tech.   

baseballhs posted:

I thought that decommitting was really frowned upon in baseball as was pulling an offer, is that not true?  I was under the impression that their word meant more in baseball than it seems to in football?

Traditionally, that has been true, but I see more and more kids who committed early pulling their commitments, usually after "much thought and prayer."

I can also tell you that some schools no longer treat those commitments as a hands off situation like they used to. As commitments start happening earlier I believe it will go the way of football and basketball as it regards the sanctity of verbal commitments.

roothog66 posted:
baseballhs posted:

I thought that decommitting was really frowned upon in baseball as was pulling an offer, is that not true?  I was under the impression that their word meant more in baseball than it seems to in football?

Traditionally, that has been true, but I see more and more kids who committed early pulling their commitments, usually after "much thought and prayer."

Usually the player doesn't keep up with the school's expectations, and the school gives them the "opportunity" to de-commit and find a better situation. I don't think I've ever seen a kid de-commit because he found a spot with a "better" school. Anyone else?

MidAtlanticDad posted:
roothog66 posted:
baseballhs posted:

I thought that decommitting was really frowned upon in baseball as was pulling an offer, is that not true?  I was under the impression that their word meant more in baseball than it seems to in football?

Traditionally, that has been true, but I see more and more kids who committed early pulling their commitments, usually after "much thought and prayer."

Usually the player doesn't keep up with the school's expectations, and the school gives them the "opportunity" to de-commit and find a better situation. I don't think I've ever seen a kid de-commit because he found a spot with a "better" school. Anyone else?

No, I've seen this several times in the past year. I could give you a dozen names of kids who decommitted from mid-majors and then signed last week with Power 5 schools. On the other hand, I can't recall a single kid who decommited (publicly) from a P-5 to go to a smaller school. Though I know several who simply ended up at JC's instead without ever actually pulling their commitments.

roothog66 posted:
MidAtlanticDad posted:
roothog66 posted:
baseballhs posted:

I thought that decommitting was really frowned upon in baseball as was pulling an offer, is that not true?  I was under the impression that their word meant more in baseball than it seems to in football?

Traditionally, that has been true, but I see more and more kids who committed early pulling their commitments, usually after "much thought and prayer."

Usually the player doesn't keep up with the school's expectations, and the school gives them the "opportunity" to de-commit and find a better situation. I don't think I've ever seen a kid de-commit because he found a spot with a "better" school. Anyone else?

No, I've seen this several times in the past year. I could give you a dozen names of kids who decommitted from mid-majors and then signed last week with Power 5 schools. On the other hand, I can't recall a single kid who decommited (publicly) from a P-5 to go to a smaller school. Though I know several who simply ended up at JC's instead without ever actually pulling their commitments.

Thanks, I didn't know that was a thing.

OskiSD posted:

Interested to hear views on the lacrosse model.  Strikes me as being very difficult to enforce given the camp/showcase/etc ecosystem in youth baseball.  

I can speak a little on the lacrosse front, as I have a HS junior lacrosse player that is heavy into the recruiting right now.

Unfortunately for him, he is a junior, and this new rule change really benefits sophomores and younger in that my son's class (2019) already had a lot of early commits to many of the D1 programs...so a lot of opportunities that this rule change will bring about for those younger kids were already gone for the 2019's.

With that said, he just finished up his fall tournament schedule and is getting inundated with coach texts, emails, and calls (from DI-DIII coaches). It (as another poster said) is a bit overwhelming. It was fun at first, but now it is getting to be a bit much. He had very little contact prior to September 1 and for most of the fall. However, he played in a couple big tournaments with 80-100+ coaches at each and the flood gates opened.

Conversely, he plays with a very talented sophomore on his team (expected to go to a good D1 school) that has had zero contact with coaches (and this kid played in the same tournaments). So, it would appear that the lacrosse coaches (for the most part) are obeying this rule. The only way I have seen the lacrosse coaches kind of get around this rule is that they have talked to our travel coach "about" this  kid (knowing it will get back to the kid) and have let it be known they like what they see and will be following him.

One thing I will add is that, at least in our experience, it is much easier to get recruited in lacrosse than in baseball. I think it has to do with the way the tournaments are run. Lacrosse tournaments have all their games at one site (they divide huge grass areas into multiple fields, or have multiple fields available), whereas baseball tournaments are often scattered across one college field and a half a dozen (or more) high school fields that may or may not have coaches present. When you go to these lacrosse tournaments, the coaches just find a field and sit on a sideline for a half...then turn around and walk 10 yards and plop down by another field for the second half. These guys are able to see a dozen or more teams each day...baseball coaches are not. I have seen that you definitely get "more bang for your buck" with the fees you pay to lacrosse travel teams vs. baseball showcase teams.

Knowing what I know now, I would have absolutely gone a different route for my baseball son. He has ended up at a good place where he is very happy, which is great, but he had limited opportunities. Looking back, I would have spent more money on individual showcases than on team dues/expenses. At the individual showcases, you are guaranteed to be seen by a lot more coaches than you will ever get at a team event (unless you go to PG and end up at Lakepoint). This seems like a no-brainer, but you get "blinded" in thinking that baseball is a team sport therefore you MUST be on a team to be seen...when in reality it is not the case.

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