Is SAT score of 1600 good enough to get in D1 college

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February 12, 2009 10:22 AM

Is SAT score of 1600 good enough to get in D1 college
 
 
 
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February 12, 2009 10:38 AM

It sounds as though you are including the verbal, math, and writing scores? It might be helpful to clarify...It definitely depends on the school, and it helps to check what the school's average is.
 
 
 
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February 12, 2009 10:49 AM

It depends upon the college and on the players grades and other activities. For example, let's assume a 3.0 and a 1600/2400, and use the Pac 10, based upon a quick glance at the common data set.

(here is the link to WSU to give you an idea of what a common data set is - simply type the name of the school and common data set on google and then look at tab C)

http://www.ir.wsu.edu/inter.asp?id=1&ns=home&tn=datamain&sf=&sd=

I would guess something like this:

Likely to get in:
ASU, Arizona, Oregon, OSU.

Maybe:
USC, WSU

Not likely:
Stanford, Cal, UCLA, UW
 
 
 
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February 12, 2009 11:02 AM

Not a simple answer. The lower the SAT, the higher the GPA and greater the extracurriculars need to be. I assume your son's extracurricular is baseball, Smile . It's hard to add in more extracurricular, but if it's meaningful and related (coaching kids, working at your town sports field, etc, then a lower SAT score can be compensated for.

As an aside, there are many (myself included) who believe that it is better to have a higher GPA and a lower SAT than the reverse. Shows a kid is a hard worker, even if he doesn't test too well. The opposite scenario can introduce the concept of "underachiever" and other negative synonyms.
 
 
 
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February 12, 2009 1:21 PM

yes ,a combined score of all ,He has a 3.3 g.p.a.does extra activities really matter that much.I can see if he was just a student it should higher,but a student athlete spends alot of time training.
 
 
 
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February 12, 2009 3:31 PM

extra activites -

Colleges want to be sure that students don't underestimate the importance of life beyond baseball. It's important to show the admissions people that you are engaged in the larger community. This can be just a few hours a month in community service, church activity, school club. Quality is better than quantity.
 
 
 
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February 12, 2009 3:46 PM

If I may piggyback a question... has anyone had any experience with schools using weighted GPA's to qualify potential students?

Most of the college guidebooks we have been using to identify potential schools for my daughter outline the required GPA and SAT scores needed to be considered for enrollment. Can/should we use her weighted GPA as a data point or the base GPA? She is getting frustrated because she thinks some of the schools she is interested in have too high of a requirement based on her current un-weighted GPA, assuming you have a good SAT score I am wondering if the extra 1.0 or more added to the GPA would warrant consideration.

It sure was a lot easier with to figure out with our oldest that was a baseball player, we found that if they wanted you schools seemed to figure out a way to get you enrolled. I’m not saying you don't need good grades but we found that some of these schools that list minimum requirements as 1400 plus on your SAT for the general population would allow a student athlete to be enrolled with less. In the recruitment process we heard a baseball coach at a camp say (at the same school that requires a 1400 and 4.0) if you can get 1000 or 1100 on your SAT with 3.0 GPA they can get you enrolled.

Parents shouldn’t discount the value of being an athlete as a qualifier or enrollment.
 
Last edited by jerseydad February 12, 2009 3:48 PM
 
 
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February 12, 2009 4:15 PM

In general, when using the guidebooks, she should be using the weighted GPA to figure out what schools make sense.

When it comes time to actually apply, look into the college websites a little more because it seems that most colleges have their own formulas for weighting. Essentially they create their own GPAs.
 
 
 
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February 12, 2009 4:47 PM

They reccommend taking the SAT and ACT over.Just keep studying until you achieve your highest score?Do colleges frown on multiple test takes?
 
 
 
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February 12, 2009 5:06 PM

With the increase in numbers of students applying the better your grades, the better your chances

Trust me on this
 
 
 
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February 12, 2009 5:26 PM

Schools largely ignore the Writing portion, so combine the math+verbal ....... it's a much better barometer that way.
 
 
 
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February 12, 2009 7:49 PM

that's right krak.........best to combine math and cr.....

a 1300 plus will open a lot of doors

surfdog.....google search "common data set" for the schools of interest......or at the school's website......search common data set...or freshman profile. you can glean a lot of information from reading those........like average sat for incoming freshmen, etc. you can also run searches at petersons.com
 
Last edited by btbballfannumber1 February 12, 2009 7:50 PM
 
 
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February 12, 2009 10:09 PM

quote:
has anyone had any experience with schools using weighted GPA's to qualify potential students? .... Parents shouldn’t discount the value of being an athlete as a qualifier or enrollment.
There isn't a standard prodecure for weighting grades. A 4.5 at one high school could be better than a 4.8 at another. My daughter was asked her unweighted GPA and then what level courses she took.

I was surprised when a friend told me his son was accepted into a major D1 academic university with a 3.5 taking only academic courses (no honors or AP classes). He did have a reasonably high PG ranking.
 
Last edited by RJM February 12, 2009 10:12 PM
 
 
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February 12, 2009 11:09 PM

quote:
My daughter was asked her unweighted GPA and then what level courses she took.


Yes - the trend at high schools (at least the private ones) is to UNweight the GPA on the transcripts they send to the colleges. The college then has a point system for each individual high school, and that, combined with the difficulty of the courses a student has taken, is how the gpa is factored.

Kind of like comparing two kids from two different leagues. Kid one has a .475 batting average from a weak league. Kid two has a .320 average in a competitive league. Coaches know how to factor those numbers for a more equal reading.

By the way, are there really kids getting 4.5s and 4.8s? My oldest kid just got into a competitive D1/academic school (although not to play sports) with an unweighted 3.5gpa. Don't let the numbers fool you. It's a whole package issue.
 
 
 
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February 13, 2009 6:37 AM

Having been involved with baseball players for many years now I have found that the region of the country you reside in as well as the HS you attend has a big impact---many colleges are looking for diversity in their enrollment and the education you get in certain high schools and high school systems in the country plays a big part in selection
 
 
 
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February 13, 2009 7:10 AM

It depends on your level of talent. If you are a legitimate D-1 player -- a player who has a real chance to contribute at a BCS school (Pac 10, ACC, SEC), then a great number for all but a few schools is 1000 (math, critical reading) or 1500 if you want to throw in the writing. This goes along with a GPA of between 2.6 and 3.0. And what I mean by that, is that you are definitely in with those results.

At Stanford, increase the SAT to 550 in all three categories (or 1100 for the two)and the GPA to 3.0 and you are in -- if they like you enough on the field. The ACT provides additional opportunity.

If, however, you are not a player who clearly can help these schools on the field, the requirements are much, much higher.
 
 
 
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February 13, 2009 10:43 AM

jemaz- do you personally know RECENT players that have been recruited and admitted by Stanford with those scores?

We live the the Bay Area and I can tell you for certain that some "stud" baseball players were not admited by Stanford and they had higher gpa's.

According to Coach Stotz they are looking for a minimum 3.6 gpa and atleast 1200 SAT math and reading. This was last year and we know of a player that was listed as an early signing to Stanford and didn't make it through admissions.

And, if by some chance you are admitted to a college and you have significantly lower scores/gpa be prepared to work your butt off to stay eligible.
 
 
 
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February 13, 2009 10:50 AM

You really need to go by the scores for the verbal and math only. Most schools still do not consider the writing.
 
 
 
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February 13, 2009 12:15 PM

quote:
At Stanford, increase the SAT to 550 in all three categories (or 1100 for the two)and the GPA to 3.0 and you are in -- if they like you enough on the field. The ACT provides additional opportunity.



You could hit 100 HR over the fence and I do not think those scores would get you into Stanford.I think the UCs if you have 3.3-3.5 and decent SATs you could get in with baseball,but not Stanford.You have to make it through admissions ,I have heard as mentioned previously that there are players they have wanted and they can not get in.
Stanford of all the schools in CA. or anywhere besides IVIES is probably one of the toughest.I think the coach there has to be a GREAT recruiter and leave no stones unturned to find the types of kids who play there.My hats off to those kids becasue they are really a special bunch of young men.College baseball is hard for all but some schools are harder than others.
I remember watching them on TV years ago, there was a guy pitching who was going to school to be some type of biomedical degree, he had a 4.0 at Stanford and played baseball.I was thinking these boys are incredible.
 
Last edited by fanofgame February 13, 2009 12:16 PM
 
 
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February 13, 2009 1:16 PM

A 1200 on math and verbal (3.5 GPA with some honors and AP classes) got us from: a you are on the line for admissions from the top most schools in Eastern US. To: he could get in anywhere else with no problem. Then there was the... thank goodness you can read and write...here is lots of academic money and please be in our honors program...now I can balance out with admissions the kid I want with a 2.3 and a not so good SAT.
 
 
 
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February 13, 2009 3:42 PM

The answer to the above questions is a) I try to make it a point not to pry into the personal academic information of kids other than my own. However, I personally know some kids at Stanford either now or recently who would consider it an accomplishment to have the scores I described. b) I have had this further confirmed by players currently or very recently on the roster (in fact, I have been told by these players -- on last year's roster -- that 1100 could do the trick. c) I have heard from well-placed sources in addition to the players. Take that to mean what you wish.

But, as I said, they really have to want you. The better you fill the need, the lower the score can be.

The last thing I will say is this: For most students I know, 1100 is a very good score.
 
Last edited by jemaz February 13, 2009 3:53 PM
 
 
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February 13, 2009 7:23 PM

There have been several good discussions on grades and SATs, etc. See the following post:

http://hsbaseballweb.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/6616002781/...451001592#1451001592
 
 
 
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February 13, 2009 7:24 PM

PS It also has a posted thread within it that talks in depth about SATs, testing, and so on.
 
 
 
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March 11, 2009 11:08 PM

It also depends on your intended major. An 1100 won't get you into engineering at Cal, UCLA, Stanford, Cal Poly.......
 
 
 
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