Is there any hope?

Next level pedestrian is lower level superb.  Next level pedestrian is still next level.  There is no shame, for instance, in a MLB "average" fastball.  It's an MLB fastball!

BTW. Smoltz and Glavine discussed during a Braves game that young pitchers are all about velocity right now, and are getting bashed because they don't know enough about movement and location, aka, soft-contact.   I'm just telling you, next level people want winners.

4T2 posted:

Teaching Elder, I can assure you that I am legitimately bewildered by the potential "next steps" in his baseball life, and that although he has been a standout player at every level, I recognize that the world is a huge place with a lot of baseball players in it. Because of these factors, I started researching...and found that there are so many players with almost unbelievable measurables that I started to legitimately wonder if he really even stood a chance of playing beyond high school. Did I use some hyperbole in describing the metrics I felt he was competing against? Absolutely. But given his success so far, and the measurables he has, and comparing them to those others, it seemed to me that he may not stand a chance at the next level. He has always been a very good hitter--took him out of LL after 11U because even at the district tourney, they wouldn't pitch to him. He's played "up" a year in travel ball ever since and has always led the team in just about every offensive category. He's crazy strong. He has always been a very effective pitcher, but not always with the K (velocity an issue?). At the highest-level-competition tournament of which he's been a part (in Mesa, AZ last year), he got the win in the championship game, going 5 innings on 44 pitches, giving up 1 run (2K, 1BB). He induces soft contact, even without overwhelming velocity.

In short, his game performance appears excellent. His measurables, on the other hand, appear pedestrian at best in comparison with the next-level candidates. Because of this shortcoming, I was legitimately wondering: Is there any hope?

-42

His measurables aren't bad. Those crazy measurables you reed about are draft prospects or top level D1 prospects.

Maybe his measurables don't get him to Vanderbilt but D 3 prospects and even weaker conference d1 prospects aren't anywhere close to that.

I'm pretty sure there is some level for him to play if he is performing above average in high school.

Dominik85 posted:
RJM posted:

C's get degrees doesn't cut it. College professors hand out B's (3.0) like candy at Halloween. If a student doesn't get 3.3 or better he's not separating himself from the pack.

Do college coaches care about the grades beyond passing exams easily enough to stay eligible? What is the benefit of an A student for the college coach compared to C student as long as he passes the exams?

I'm not saying grades aren't super important, just asking what interest an athletic recruiter has in their student athlete being good at school?

If you're talking D1 it's huge.  My son got 25% for baseball and 26% for his HS grades/ACT for a total of 51%.  Leaving out of pocket for Tuiton/Room/Board less than $10K/year.  The coach knew he only had to give us 25% because of the academic money.  If he had wanted my son and couldn't offer the academic money it would have cost him more of his 11.7 baseball schollys or just offer the 25% and risk losing my son (or any kid he wanted for that matter).  Coaches don't necessarily care about HS grades....it's the finance portion of getting kids to their program that makes them care.

4T2 posted:

I've been a lurker for a little while now, finally signed up since it's seems to be time for my 2020 to figure out his baseball future and there is a ton of info here. Having read a lot on here, it would seem that if a kid isn't 6'2" and 200 pounds, throwing 350mph, running a sub-5.0 sixty, showing consistent 4-digit exit velos, at 12 years old...and doesn't come from a family that can drop 6-digits into travel expenses/showcases, and isn't from the sunny areas of the country, then he might as well quit baseball and take up recreational stamp collecting.

Realistically, does a kid with the following attributes have a chance of anything better than bar-league softball?

He's 15 years, 3 months old. 5'11, 205 pounds; Bats left, throws left; outfield velo (best): 82, infield (best) 80; LHP with very good off-speed stuff and good movement on his 75-78mph FB; exit velo (average): 86, (best): 95. Ran a 6.9 sixty, 3.9 home-to-first. (Measurements are the averages from 3 different tryouts and are independent)

Should I start preparing him to have his dreams crushed and heart broken, or is there any hope?

-42

Come on!  He's in a great position, commencing with current off season to get his butt stronger, improve arm mechanics, keep hitting.  My 2018, currently 17 and 8 months old is only now 5'10, 173 lbs: threw 78-80 across IF two years ago, exit velo was sitting 80ish, ran 7.1 best verified.  NOW: throws 90 across IF, Exit velo 93, 6.9 runner and finally trending lower.  Plenty of mid D1 interest-offers, but pursuing a higher academic route, which has been its own quagmire (again timing plays a big part).

His interest in whatever schools, his academic chops, family budget will dictate a list of colleges to pursue.  Given his measurables can he play?  Does his play stand out?

We parents aren't dream killers, but we should be sprinkling suggestions of alternate paths and plan B's.  The recruiting path is a lot about timing: when you hit a certain physical size and how it meshes with your baseball skills which were on show that particular day.

 

Buckeye 2015 posted:
Dominik85 posted:
RJM posted:

C's get degrees doesn't cut it. College professors hand out B's (3.0) like candy at Halloween. If a student doesn't get 3.3 or better he's not separating himself from the pack.

Do college coaches care about the grades beyond passing exams easily enough to stay eligible? What is the benefit of an A student for the college coach compared to C student as long as he passes the exams?

I'm not saying grades aren't super important, just asking what interest an athletic recruiter has in their student athlete being good at school?

If you're talking D1 it's huge.  My son got 25% for baseball and 26% for his HS grades/ACT for a total of 51%.  Leaving out of pocket for Tuiton/Room/Board less than $10K/year.  The coach knew he only had to give us 25% because of the academic money.  If he had wanted my son and couldn't offer the academic money it would have cost him more of his 11.7 baseball schollys or just offer the 25% and risk losing my son (or any kid he wanted for that matter).  Coaches don't necessarily care about HS grades....it's the finance portion of getting kids to their program that makes them care.

This and more.

Coaches want players that will not only stay eligible, show initiative and responsibility, but maintain certain GPA. I do believe a 3.0 or better team average GPA can earn him extra  bonus $$$$ put into their contracts.  

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