Last Minute Tips

For those who are in the Draft mode, a couple of things we picked up, and FWIW:

  1. Build that email list of all the scouts you've met, as well as your advisers. If you meet someone new, add them to the list.
  2. Use that email list to continually and simultaneously update everyone on private or team workouts, weather updates, etc. You want to be sure that everyone who receives the emails knows that the other clubs are receiving the emails (see #6 below as to why).
  3. Don't defer to the HS coach to communicate game status: he'll sometimes not be able to get that info out. You do it. If you do it, you can be sure everyone gets the same info at the same time.
  4. If you can, publish a schedule of workouts (solo and with the team) online. Google Sheets is probably the easiest method, as you can give the schedule's URL to your email list. Of course, keep it up to date.
  5. If your son is a position player, try to conduct private BP sessions during last class period. Here's why: far more often than not, scouts have downtime between lunch and HS practices and games. A series of frequent private BP out on the field witnessed solely by the scouts will prove to be beneficial.
  6. Communicate with all the clubs, and don't freeze anyone out. Why? Create competition! It's one of the few variables you control.
  7. Try to centralize all communications with Mom or Dad. Son and Coach may not be able to respond via text during school hours, but Mom and/or Dad can.
Original Post

This is good information, but honestly asking:

is that stuff really necessary?  If a kid is good enough to get drafted, does he really need to market himself to scouts?  Especially once the scouts already know about him?

I don't understand the point. Are we trying to move up higher in the draft order?  I'm not a scout, but if I was I'd want to see how hard the player works and prepares, not how well they market themselves.

Perhaps I've completely misunderstood this

3and2Fastball posted:

This is good information, but honestly asking:

is that stuff really necessary?  If a kid is good enough to get drafted, does he really need to market himself to scouts?  Especially once the scouts already know about him?

I don't understand the point. Are we trying to move up higher in the draft order?  I'm not a scout, but if I was I'd want to see how hard the player works and prepares, not how well they market themselves.

Perhaps I've completely misunderstood this

This is the time of year when the process goes beyond written reports from the area scout towards the regional and national scouting directors, as well as the VP of Player Development and in some cases the GM.

Now why is this important? Because a week before the draft, everyone gets together to put together their draft boards, and the placement of a player on that draft often relies upon the ability of the area scout to argue the case for that player. Q: do you as a player or a parent of a player or an adviser to a player want everything to come down to an area scout's rhetorical skills? Of course not: you want everyone to be on the same page regarding the player's skill set.

And you want everyone to know that everyone else has been observing the player...from levels beyond the area scout.

So are you marketing the player? No. You're just ensuring that everyone from all levels has been observing the player, and that everyone knows that the other guys have been observing the player.  

3 and 2,

A couple of specific reasons scouts appreciate what JoeMktg preaches is that area scouts will bring in their crosscheckers, special asst's, & scouting directors to see a kid.  If they know that the player will be taking BP on the field vs. the cage, they'll want to make sure they're there to see it.  If weather has washed the game out, they want to know before they haul their boss in a car 1+ hrs only to find the team isn't playing.  It's not so much about marketing your son as it is about helping the scouts do their job, and to Joe's point, allowing as many eyes to observe in person what they'll be making a call on come June.

BP is extremely important as it may be the only pitches as well known prospect will see.  Many scouts will watch a 1 for 1 night with two BB and a HBP.  Scouts will video BP and will also observe the player shagging balls in the field, taking in and out, etc., as it may be the only real action they get to witness.  Most area scouts are coming to multiple games, so this isn't as important for them as it is for the guys above them that they bring that may only get one or two chances in a season to see a kid firsthand.

Joe nails it.  It's really about "help me help you" with the area scouts. They're trying to do their job and put as many of "their" prospects in front of their bosses so informed decisions can be made.  The more you can do to help them, the more it will help you.

Totally agree and very much agree with the point of watching on field BP is very important because as stated the game at bats may not be there.  We had a kid drafted by the Yankees about 4 years ago and nobody pitched to him.  It was very frustrating for our kid but to every scout that came to watch.  We played our conference rival and their coach stated he was not going to let our guy beat him.  Well in the first inning our guy batted 3rd and he was intentionally walked.  In the first inning we scored 10 runs and our stud got up twice in the first and walked intentionally both times.  You would think that since the game was over they would pitch to him in the rest of his at bats - nope he was walked intentionally 5 times total before it ended in the 5th.  We had about 12 scouts there and every single one of them was pissed because they didn't get to see him hit live.  Luckily we took pregame BP on the field and they saw it but it's not the same as live hitting.

And that isn't good coaching from the other coach.  That's just being a d*ck to be a d*ck.

Game tied and men are on and you walk him, that is strategy.  But this opposing coach made it personal even when the score made the intentional walk a non-factor.

Don't we teach our kids that when they get beat and beat fairly to accept it?  Hit a smoking line shot and the guy pulls one out his rump and makes the catch, we tell our kids to tip your cap at a great effort and go back to work right?   

But coaches are supposed to lead by example.  My brother in law is a HS head coach.  I know for a fact if it was 0-0 to start a game and no one on, he is going to challenge that batter.  A: That is his style and B: He believes in his kids to get the job done.

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