Maybe This Time

Matt13 posted:
SEC Hopeful posted:
Coach_May posted:

i will get it right? 8 years ago I walked away from coaching HS baseball. I wanted to actually watch my own son play in college. I wanted to see what it was like to just go watch games. I continued to do some scouting and coach showcase. 

Well I am officially the HC at the school I coached at for many years. Since leaving I have reflected on the things I wished I had done. I also have spent just as much if not more time reflecting on the things I wish I hadn't done.

This was a very tough decision. My life has never been in a better place. For every reason I could think this was the right move for me I could think of 10 of why this wasn't a good move for me. 

But in the end it simply came down to me having the opportunity to get those things right one last time. An opportunity to give to others. 

For those who are people of faith I ask for your prayers. Prayers that I will be what I ought to be. Prayers that I will be the coach God would have me be. Prayers that I will give these young men exactly what he would have me give.

I'm not worried about winning on the field. We will win. I need your prayers that I will give them what it takes to win off the field and be the example I need to be.

I understand the awesome responsibility and the weight it carries. Pray that I give them even more than I require. 

Am I missing something? Are you being sent on a mission to an Afghani village without a weapon and being asked to take out all of Isis or something? You are coaching a high school baseball team, man! Seriously????

Well, that would be a challenge, since ISIS isn't in Afghanistan...

Gee, thanks Matt. The point is praying for divine assistance in coaching doing so is ridiculous in my opinion . I would rather he save his request for prayers to those who would really benefit from them, homeless women and children, those afflicted with disease, those living in abusive situations. He isn't charging a hill against a machine gun nest.

There are just far too many coaches who think they have some mission to turn out citizens instead of baseball players. I will raise my son, not you. If your character is such that he takes something positive away from his time with you, so be it and thank you. But that is not what you are there for. Focus on the job, teach and coach the game. Don't take the position that you are there to create young men who are great citizens in the future. That is taking your role a little out of context.

SEC Hopeful posted:
Coach_May posted:

i will get it right? 8 years ago I walked away from coaching HS baseball. I wanted to actually watch my own son play in college. I wanted to see what it was like to just go watch games. I continued to do some scouting and coach showcase. 

Well I am officially the HC at the school I coached at for many years. Since leaving I have reflected on the things I wished I had done. I also have spent just as much if not more time reflecting on the things I wish I hadn't done.

This was a very tough decision. My life has never been in a better place. For every reason I could think this was the right move for me I could think of 10 of why this wasn't a good move for me. 

But in the end it simply came down to me having the opportunity to get those things right one last time. An opportunity to give to others. 

For those who are people of faith I ask for your prayers. Prayers that I will be what I ought to be. Prayers that I will be the coach God would have me be. Prayers that I will give these young men exactly what he would have me give.

I'm not worried about winning on the field. We will win. I need your prayers that I will give them what it takes to win off the field and be the example I need to be.

I understand the awesome responsibility and the weight it carries. Pray that I give them even more than I require. 

Am I missing something? Are you being sent on a mission to an Afghani village without a weapon and being asked to take out all of Isis or something? You are coaching a high school baseball team, man! Seriously????

Why would you jump down this mans throat just for being humble asking for a little bit of God's grace and help in a decision he clearly has given a lot of thought to? Coach clearly just wants the best for the kids he is going to coach. I understand freely questioning people opinions on things, that one I don't get.

Relax and take it easy

JCG thank you. I respect that response so much.

Thank all of you for your kind words and support. Prepster we will definitely catch each other at the Bosh this year. Going to be a special season for the Heels.

I finished putting my staff together last night and I am very excited about it. Pratt Maynard my former player who was a first team ACC catcher and 2nd round pick will be my assistant coach. I coached him from T-ball through high school. Clarence Peace who also was a stand out in college and played for me will also be an assistant. And Matt McCutheon who's father was a long time high school coach will assist as well. All three of these guys are outstanding men and very knowledgeable.

Again thanks for the kind words and I appreciate your prayers. I will def keep you guys posted and thanks. 

 

 

SEC Hopeful posted:

Gee, thanks Matt. The point is praying for divine assistance in coaching doing so is ridiculous in my opinion . I would rather he save his request for prayers to those who would really benefit from them, homeless women and children, those afflicted with disease, those living in abusive situations. He isn't charging a hill against a machine gun nest.

There are just far too many coaches who think they have some mission to turn out citizens instead of baseball players. I will raise my son, not you. If your character is such that he takes something positive away from his time with you, so be it and thank you. But that is not what you are there for. Focus on the job, teach and coach the game. Don't take the position that you are there to create young men who are great citizens in the future. That is taking your role a little out of context.

I bet you're life is just a ball of fun. 

OK, best of luck in this "new" coaching venture. Now that the wishing of luck is out of the way....If those parents have any idea how much "street cred" you have here, I cannot imagine how excited they must be. If my sons were in your program I would already have a binder made up of your posts here, when I heard anyone speak of negativity a sheet of a thread pertaining to their mis-givings would be handed to them and a discussion would commence. Seems like everyone frets over the ol' HS coach and how their kids won't get a fair shake or whatever this time of year, but to have you coaching my son would be an honor, something that would be of value to him his entire life, that I know. I would feel like I won the lottery, seriously. Several times each year for this reason or that, I re-read for 100th time The Old Oak Stump, it cures whatever is bothering me and sets me straight. I can wish you luck, but you don't need it. Have a blast and go do what you do.

SEC I'm going out on a limb here and say that God and the good Lord are probably fairly decent at multi-tasking that they can bless Coach and others who may need it.  Could be wrong but I doubt it.

Coach May good luck and after a 5 year break (9 as head coach) I'm back in the saddle again as well.  Hopefully, we can meet up in the playoffs and have a classic game.  

Coach May, goodluck and many prayers to you and your staff this year. Personally I am grateful to hear of good and decent men/ladies still willing to be a positive influence to young men and women. Going thru MS and HS can be a very difficult time for many teenagers and to have someone in authority speaking positive things in their lives is a huge plus in my book. I pray you have great success in the lives of those young men who are put under your care.

SEC Hopeful stated: "...The point is praying for divine assistance in coaching doing so is ridiculous in my opinion . I would rather he save his request for prayers to those who would really benefit from them, homeless women and children, those afflicted with disease, those living in abusive situations. He isn't charging a hill against a machine gun nest.

There are just far too many coaches who think they have some mission to turn out citizens instead of baseball players. I will raise my son, not you. If your character is such that he takes something positive away from his time with you, so be it and thank you. But that is not what you are there for. Focus on the job, teach and coach the game. Don't take the position that you are there to create young men who are great citizens in the future. That is taking your role a little out of context."

Madam SEC hopeful - you don't have a clue as to the impact a coach has on children, and high school players remain children. Any man or woman who doesn't realize the effect he or she has on the team's players is not a coach. And a parent who doesn't recognize that aspect of sport is blind to the benefits of competitive athletics. Teaching the game is so much more than dealing with the mechanics and situations. It has everything to do with understanding the dynamics of the sport, the interactions of player to player, the concept of sportsmanship and fair play, the attention to detail, the pursuit of perfection through hard work, the grace to celebrate victory and accept defeat. And never is a request for divine assistance worthy of ridicule.

Perhaps, Madam hopeful, your world is that of daddy ball, juice box treats, participation trophies and a picnic after the game, but the real world of coaching demands that each and every coach meet his or her fundamental responsibility to assist the players in their journey to adulthood through their chosen sport.

I don't know Coach May. My son didn't play for him but has played for coaches like him throughout his career.  They were not afraid to cast eyes skyward and pray for help. And my son is the better for it. His college decision was made in large part because the school's coaches exemplify the kind of person my son admires and wants to emulate. They help mold young men into contributors to society. From what I've read of Coach May, he is that kind of man and that kind of coach.

 

 

 

NotThatGuy posted:

SEC Hopeful stated: "...The point is praying for divine assistance in coaching doing so is ridiculous in my opinion . I would rather he save his request for prayers to those who would really benefit from them, homeless women and children, those afflicted with disease, those living in abusive situations. He isn't charging a hill against a machine gun nest.

There are just far too many coaches who think they have some mission to turn out citizens instead of baseball players. I will raise my son, not you. If your character is such that he takes something positive away from his time with you, so be it and thank you. But that is not what you are there for. Focus on the job, teach and coach the game. Don't take the position that you are there to create young men who are great citizens in the future. That is taking your role a little out of context."

Madam SEC hopeful - you don't have a clue as to the impact a coach has on children, and high school players remain children. Any man or woman who doesn't realize the effect he or she has on the team's players is not a coach. And a parent who doesn't recognize that aspect of sport is blind to the benefits of competitive athletics. Teaching the game is so much more than dealing with the mechanics and situations. It has everything to do with understanding the dynamics of the sport, the interactions of player to player, the concept of sportsmanship and fair play, the attention to detail, the pursuit of perfection through hard work, the grace to celebrate victory and accept defeat. And never is a request for divine assistance worthy of ridicule.

Perhaps, Madam hopeful, your world is that of daddy ball, juice box treats, participation trophies and a picnic after the game, but the real world of coaching demands that each and every coach meet his or her fundamental responsibility to assist the players in their journey to adulthood through their chosen sport.

I don't know Coach May. My son didn't play for him but has played for coaches like him throughout his career.  They were not afraid to cast eyes skyward and pray for help. And my son is the better for it. His college decision was made in large part because the school's coaches exemplify the kind of person my son admires and wants to emulate. They help mold young men into contributors to society. From what I've read of Coach May, he is that kind of man and that kind of coach.

 

 

 

I "liked" that and will add that my son is more likely to listen to parental like advice from his coach rather than his parent. I hope to God my sons coaches feel it is their job to turn out a good citizen and a good ball player.

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