Non Scholarship Roster Spot?

A walk-on refers to a guy who shows up at the start of Fall workouts without invitation or scholarship, while a "preferred or invited" walk-on is someone the coach knows already and has asked or allowed to tryout without a scholarship that particular year. Both these types will have to earn a roster spot during the Fall workouts. A non-scholarship roster offer sounds like the player has a verbal guarantee by the coach that he will be on the 35 man spring roster (DI) without scholarship money that year. A preferred or invited walk-on has a little advantage over guys who just walk-on without prior knowledge of them by the coach.
I appreciate the insight and clarification.

2013 attended a showcase on a D-I campus and the recruiting coordinator and head coach both insisted that at their program once the 35-man roster is set, each player is treated exactly the same, regardless of how you got there. Same workout/practice regiment, equipment, expectations, need to perform, etc.

They implied that this is not always the case at other institutions, but we have heard from parents of players at this school that what they said is accurate for their program.

Can anyone share other experiences?
I think Three Bagger described it well.

We had some different offers ranging from scholarship money, to "preferred walk on", to no athletic money, but a guaranteed roster spot. The bottom line is that any offer is only as good as the word of the coaching staff.
I have heard horror stories where things were promised and then not delivered, to great stories of coaches going above and beyond for kids who get hurt, but still keep their scholarships regardless of if they can play.
quote:
Originally posted by LHPMom2012:
So when a non-scholarship roster spot is offered and accepted, it's completely a verbal thing? There's no LOI signed or guarantees on either side?


Yes there is no binding commitment from the University for anything so there is only a verbal agreement between the player and the coach.
The coaches will also not comment on these players in the media since there is nothing binding on either side.

There are obviously lots of dangers particularly if the coach leaves or is fired. Player is then up the creek.
At least in my son's case he signed the academic agreement with the financial aid department and we sent in the deposit and signed that he was planning on attending the school.

I guess it might be called a LOI, but it was not a contract or in the form of an athletic LOI. I will look at the document and see what they called it, but it is just a one page document indicating that you are going to the school in the fall.
quote:
quote:
Originally posted by LHPMom2012:
So when a non-scholarship roster spot is offered and accepted, it's completely a verbal thing? There's no LOI signed or guarantees on either side?



Yes there is no binding commitment from the University for anything so there is only a verbal agreement between the player and the coach.
The coaches will also not comment on these players in the media since there is nothing binding on either side.

This is not universally true. At some of the more expensive colleges, it is fairly routine for players to be guaranteed a roster spot even though they are not offered baseball scholarship money.

I can speak with certainty about Duke. Because of the high cost of attendance, many families will qualify for financial aid that is equal to or better than a decent sized baseball scholarship.

For such players, they get admitted to the school, accept the financial aid offer, and then sign an "Institutional Letter of Intent," that the NCAA recognizes as a commitment by both parties that allows the baseball program to include the player in the press releases about the recruiting class.

And the baseball program does not distinguish between players on baseball $$ vs. players on financial aid $$.
quote:
Originally posted by Rob Kremer:
quote:
quote:
Originally posted by LHPMom2012:
So when a non-scholarship roster spot is offered and accepted, it's completely a verbal thing? There's no LOI signed or guarantees on either side?



Yes there is no binding commitment from the University for anything so there is only a verbal agreement between the player and the coach.
The coaches will also not comment on these players in the media since there is nothing binding on either side.

This is not universally true. At some of the more expensive colleges, it is fairly routine for players to be guaranteed a roster spot even though they are not offered baseball scholarship money.

I can speak with certainty about Duke. Because of the high cost of attendance, many families will qualify for financial aid that is equal to or better than a decent sized baseball scholarship.

For such players, they get admitted to the school, accept the financial aid offer, and then sign an "Institutional Letter of Intent," that the NCAA recognizes as a commitment by both parties that allows the baseball program to include the player in the press releases about the recruiting class.

And the baseball program does not distinguish between players on baseball $$ vs. players on financial aid $$.


What Rob posts is correct, and these players should not be confused with walk on or even invited walk on.
This also applies to players who do not need either baseball or financial or academic $$. However, like the above they must pass admissions to be included on the roster.

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