Offers Contingent on Better SAT/ACT Score?

Does anyone have experience/knowledge regarding D-1 academic schools making offers contingent on SAT/ACT scores?

Example: A 2019 prospect has a 4.0 GPA but has not yet taken SAT/ACT or the first test he took did not result in a a very high score. Aside form Ivy League, will some academic schools offer contingent on those scores going up?

I would think it's tricky for the academic school coaches as a prospect may have a couple of options at solid schools that do not require an SAT/ACT score that "University of Academic" requires. 

Appreciate the help.

WCP

Original Post

For a 2019, I'd say if he's hoping to up his score he had better take the test as early as he can  this spring.  Most 2019's being offered by D1's are going to happen this summer I'm not sure if coaches will be willing to wait until fall to hear if the score came up enough to meet their standards.  There are plenty  of kids available to D1's....unless they REALLY want  a kid I'm thinking that instead of waiting, they'll just move on to the next kid

So I sat behind (unintentionally) 3 RCs at a well known event a few summers ago.  It was a learning festival for me!  One was texting his GF or some other women, but that is a different story.

I could hear their conversations and often see their phones.  One kept looking up players on PG for example.  All were D1 schools, none of which my son had an interest in attending.  They were from VA and NC.  None would be considered "high academic."

One asked another about a certain player.  RC1 said something like "I told him he needs to retake the ACT and get at least a 21."  I remember thinking REALLY?  That just was not in my orbit, as my 2017 was sitting on his nearly perfect scores.  The other coach asked how many times he had taken it.  RC1 said twice, but he will take it as many times as it takes if he wants t come to X.

 

 

I'm not great with the search function  but the gyst of a post a few yrs ago was that someone was offered a scholarship to ND contingent on a getting  29 or 30 on the ACT,    he also could go to Georgia and needed a 24-25  and Miss St needed him to get a 19.      So it does sound like the younger kids might get contingent offers.  

gunner34 posted:

I'm not great with the search function  but the gyst of a post a few yrs ago was that someone was offered a scholarship to ND contingent on a getting  29 or 30 on the ACT,    he also could go to Georgia and needed a 24-25  and Miss St needed him to get a 19.      So it does sound like the younger kids might get contingent offers.  

Gunner, we have close family friends with a daughter going to ND on a scholarship for her sport. She absolutely needed to hit an ACT score -- IIRC, it was 26.

I have heard that 26 is also required for Duke baseball, but don't have first-hand knowledge of that.

2019Dad posted:
gunner34 posted:

I'm not great with the search function  but the gyst of a post a few yrs ago was that someone was offered a scholarship to ND contingent on a getting  29 or 30 on the ACT,    he also could go to Georgia and needed a 24-25  and Miss St needed him to get a 19.      So it does sound like the younger kids might get contingent offers.  

Gunner, we have close family friends with a daughter going to ND on a scholarship for her sport. She absolutely needed to hit an ACT score -- IIRC, it was 26.

I have heard that 26 is also required for Duke baseball, but don't have first-hand knowledge of that.

Confirming Duke - 26 is a must per HC Pollard.  

I've heard ND more flexible with baseball than what was mentioned about softball.  Two yrs ago a commit needed to hit a 24, couldn't, decommitted, went to ASU (kid was a top national recruit)

Bar may be set higher for the girls given the abundance of smart girl student-athletes. ??And ND-Duke football ACT requirements are much lower as well (but high revenue sport).

In another sport, I know of a kid who was recruited and committed to one of the top programs in the country.  His dream school.  He needed to take the ACT 6 times in order to get a grade acceptable to the school for admissions.  They let him in on probation and he needed to take some "starter" courses during the summer.  He did not make it through the summer and never played for the team.

Kid had talent and unfortunately other then the olympics there is not really a professional version of his sport.  He did drop down to a JUCO for two years but is now out of school. No degree.

Be careful with the academics.  The low ACT/SAT score maybe an indicator that he is not a fit for that school.

 

edcoach posted:

what ACT score is needed for an IVY? what about Stanford?  How close is a 28?  Im assuming ivy's and stanford want a 30 minimum?

way more to it then an ACT score for an IVY.  They look at a lot of different factors.  Academic rigor, grade trends, ACT scores, interviews, outside class activities.  

If you school has naviance take a look at the ivys and see what is getting in.  The standards for athletes are not much lower.

Add Stanford to the list as well.  They used to not make any commitment until the player already had a high enough ACT/SAT score but apparently having lost out on a number of recruits, they modified the practice to make offers but contingent on meeting their minimum score thresholds.  Sure they may still lose out to other schools who do not have similar contingencies, but they need to be sure the athletes they recruit can cut it with a student body of exceptionally bright students.

There have been other threads here that note how it is now all about ACT/SAT scores for the academic schools.  Right or not, GPA inflation has occurred at many schools in response to the ever increasing GPA requirements at many colleges and universities.  The University of California system is insane with most schools in the system now reporting average GPAs for incoming freshman over 4.0.  So many of the coaches and admissions officers at academic schools have wised up and are emphasizing the ACT and SAT as the driver for accepting recruits.  The demands on student athletes are well-documented.  The worse thing they can do is bring in recruits who cannot cut it academically and then both the student and school lose out.  The ACT/SAT tests have their critics, but they give a more clear indication of what a student's potential for success is than a possibly inflated GPA does.

edcoach posted:

thanks Joes87...the Ivies love his high school...I knew their admission process was rigorous just didnt know if there was a certain ACT # (minimum) required before they'd even look or consider a candidate.

It depends. The coaches have to hit a target for each recruiting class as a whole, so more academic recruits can balance out lower ones (though there is a floor). The net result is that each recruit may be -- and probably is -- given a different target. I have heard from parents that their particular kid was told he needed to get a 30 at one school. I know a kid who was told at the same school that he needed "a 28, but we might be able to get by with a 27." And a kid who was told at a different school that he needed a 26 or higher.

For Harvard-Princeton-Yale, the realistic floor might be 30. For the other 5, probably not too many below 28. But it depends on a lot of factors, (e.g., the coaches' view of his baseball ability, the academic ability of the other recruits that year, etc.).

This is not uncommon even without sports in the mix. 

Many many years ago I applied to a college and was accepted.  It wasn't a fancy college, just a state school, I think they were D2, population of about 5K.  So again, nothing special.  SEVERAL of my classmates also applied there and were given conditional acceptances based on an increased SAT score and or senior year grades meeting a certain GPA.

Schools have standards, even without sports.  Meet the standards or you can't get in.

2019 dad -- just to clarify, the academic index is the same for all the Ivies.  The schools have an umbrella index they agree to adhere to -- that's the whole point, that they have a certain "standard" and won't lower that so called standard (too much) for athletes within the League.  After all, the Ivies are just a league of schools that compete against each other.  There are numerous non athletic recruits at Ivies and top schools now who are the first in their family to go to college for example, and some (not all!) may also have lower scores but are offered admission because of other accomplishments, including the adversity they may have in their lives which may not have prepared them for a higher score.   We know a girl accepted to one of the top D3 Liberal Arts Colleges in the US with a 25 ACT, but first in her family to go to college, and compelling family issues.

So don't think that somehow HPY have a higher floor.  I think it was Yale who had a 27 or 28 recruit last year.  We have seen 26s at Ivies.  Yes more likely to see higher scores, but there are outliers.  The lower scores just mean a lower Academic Index which means the coach has to get someone higher to help balance it out.  There is a team index that fits into the overall college index.  Teams like football and hockey have a lower index than say crew or tennis.   Tucker Frawley the Yale RC says very publicly that Yale baseball has a 31 average.  That means one kid could have a 35 and another a 27.  

Sometimes it also depends where they are in their recruiting class.  Coach knows he has 7 slots for example and hypothetically needs a 31 average -- lets say he already has 5 slots filled with a 30 average, he is going to be looking for kids that bring that average up, not down for the most part.  

This doesn't mean a kid with a 26-29 ACT score or SAT equivalent will get a coveted Ivy slot, but with the right athletic skills, it has happened.    

Just saying...

joes87 posted:
edcoach posted:

what ACT score is needed for an IVY? what about Stanford?  How close is a 28?  Im assuming ivy's and stanford want a 30 minimum?

way more to it then an ACT score for an IVY.  They look at a lot of different factors.  Academic rigor, grade trends, ACT scores, interviews, outside class activities.  

If you school has naviance take a look at the ivys and see what is getting in.  The standards for athletes are not much lower.

I would add that some schools take into account where a kid is from, and what their financial situation is.  For instance, Ryan received an offer of $51,000 out of $57,000 all based on us being from Idaho (They had never had a baseball kid from Idaho.), and our financial situation.  We wouldn't even have considered the school without the substantial financial offer.  None of the $51,000 was for Athletics.

Son was told by an AC recruiting him from one of the more strict Ivies (HPY) that they "look for 1300 minimum" on new SAT.  Another AC at an Ivy outside of the HPY pond didn't blink when learning of a score in the upper 1200s - said that score should be good enough. Both were recruiting him as a RHP.  He ultimately committed to a high academic but non-Ivy D-1 school which recruited him as an outfielder who can maybe pitch. Same SAT score. But ultimately, it depends on many factors. JMO.  

Good post, TwoBoys. Thanks.

Just to clarify on the Academic Index -- each team’s AI must remain within one standard deviation of the average AI for the entire student body at that school. So if a school like Harvard has a student body with a higher AI than another school in the league, the Harvard team would likewise have a higher AI floor than that other school's team.

Also, I realized I worded my earlier post incorrectly -- that last one I mentioned was "above 26" (i.e., "27 or higher"), not "26 or higher".

 

WestCoastPapa posted:

Does anyone have experience/knowledge regarding D-1 academic schools making offers contingent on SAT/ACT scores?

Example: A 2019 prospect has a 4.0 GPA but has not yet taken SAT/ACT or the first test he took did not result in a a very high score. Aside form Ivy League, will some academic schools offer contingent on those scores going up?

I would think it's tricky for the academic school coaches as a prospect may have a couple of options at solid schools that do not require an SAT/ACT score that "University of Academic" requires. 

Appreciate the help.

WCP

Offers not necessarily but the amount of offer, absolutely.   I was informed about 4 years ago from multiple colleges that a lot of schools are making offers based off of it because it is a score that is understandable.  What I mean by that is the coaches know what they are getting.  When they see transcripts that say 4.3 with 4 AP classes and low SAT scores they have been burned to many times with those kids.  A lot of colleges privately ignore the extra point for AP and just focus on the actual GPA when they make decisions.  Other people might have different stories.  I am stating this from the stand point of a HS Coach being told this by multiple coaches and multiple levels.

Proceed with caution on "contingent offers"....two kids at my son's high school (different sports) committed to Stanford and an Ivy only to see the offers dropped when grades and test scores were not high enough. I have read that the average increase a kid can realistically do on the ACT is two points. Yes, there are exceptions and we hear about the kid who raised his score five points but don't get into a situation where the increase in score a player needs to get is not going to happen!

Ours was offered a full ride from a D1 school if he could make 24 on ACT.  He was told that they would give the difference in baseball money with what he would get for academic with 24. 

 

After UT made offer, they increased to a full ride with the ACT but said the academic money would still be there if he made 24. 

Shoveit4Ks posted:

Son got offer from Miss State before he took ACT was told he could have more money if he scored a certain number on the ACT. I think it was 26. Offer was not contingent on ACT/SAT.

Isn't that part of having a combined ACT (all sections added together) score over 115 (or so) that allows them to give you academic money plus baseball money without the academics going against the baseball quota of 11.7? Son tried three times and fell 1 point short each time. Finally let him quit trying.

It's not unusual for schools to tell a recuit he needs to get at least a certain score; it's not unusual to tell a kid who is getting an oral offer that the offer is contingent upon a certain minimum.

My best information is the Yale team has a 31 ACT average, but I doubt there are any 27s (son told me).

Arguably the best player ever to play Ivy ball over the past decade was recruited with a 28 (dad telling me).  The better the kid, the more leeway; subject to the 28 min.

For Ivy players, I am under the impression that a kid must have great grades, most difficult HS curriculum offered at that school, and a consistent (extremely high) test score. Outside activities are not relevant - while for the non-hooked applicant, those are extremely important (son did HS minimum; daughter headed the HS portion of the local food bank, in addition to a HS sport). While a full completed application is required, the essays are not particularly important (son wrote mediocre uninspired essays; daughter crafted, redrafted, and redrafted hers).

The pre-reads the Ivy's do really helps. 

I will opine that NO Ivy coach will hold a spot for a recruit hoping for a magic number. Recuiting is hard enough for the Ivies with each school getting 6 - 8 likely letters; therefore, futilely hoping for a magic number could reduce both the size and quality of the class. At a school which brings in 15 a year, there is no such worry.

Test scores can be the most difficult hurdle - as a poster noted, many HSs have grade inflation and uneven grading, so the scores are the apples to apples comparisons which are critical for similarly situated students. For players, attending and absorbing the test prep classes can be challenging because of travel ball; therefore, the earlier a kid's HS curriculum covers the material needed for the tests, the earlier the kid can begin testing. For Ivy League hopefuls, those AP classes are all capped with tests (and the prep associated) so between the AP testing, the multiple ACT/SAT tests (and prep), and baseball year round, looking way over the horizon (I.e., before 9th grade) really helps. 

 

Ha ha just saw PG finally made GPA and SAT/ACT scores not public unless you pay for the "scout level."  For the past year plus, you could see the self reported scores (obviously not certified but who would inflate as easy to be caught if the score wasn't truthful).  I can promise you there was a Yalie with a 26 or 27.  Maybe that kid raised his score, but anyone could see it...I think we even had a thread about it.  There have been a few 26s this past year at Ivies.

If you are a recruited athlete, the challenging curriculum matters much less.  If you get one of the precious slots and subsequent likely letters, the scores and the grades matter.  Not much else.  They have done a pre read, they have assessed your baseball skills, and they want you.  Have a number of good friends playing lax, football, hockey and baseball at HYP.  They were told to maintain their GPA after being recruited...almost all of them dropped honors classes to regular classes, took fewer APs etc.    

IEBSBL posted:
WestCoastPapa posted:

Does anyone have experience/knowledge regarding D-1 academic schools making offers contingent on SAT/ACT scores?

Example: A 2019 prospect has a 4.0 GPA but has not yet taken SAT/ACT or the first test he took did not result in a a very high score. Aside form Ivy League, will some academic schools offer contingent on those scores going up?

I would think it's tricky for the academic school coaches as a prospect may have a couple of options at solid schools that do not require an SAT/ACT score that "University of Academic" requires. 

Appreciate the help.

WCP

Offers not necessarily but the amount of offer, absolutely.   I was informed about 4 years ago from multiple colleges that a lot of schools are making offers based off of it because it is a score that is understandable.  What I mean by that is the coaches know what they are getting.  When they see transcripts that say 4.3 with 4 AP classes and low SAT scores they have been burned to many times with those kids.  A lot of colleges privately ignore the extra point for AP and just focus on the actual GPA when they make decisions.  Other people might have different stories.  I am stating this from the stand point of a HS Coach being told this by multiple coaches and multiple levels.

I can confirm that the Ivys care about the unweighted GPA, not the weighted GPA.  My son has been talking to several Ivys and without exception when he responded with his weighted GPA, they asked for the unweighted GPA. They seem to be looking for 3.7 or above, by the way.  They also consistently say 6-8 AP classes through senior year.  Agree with above comments on ACT/SAT scores and AI.  

Midwest Mom posted:
IEBSBL posted:
WestCoastPapa posted:

Does anyone have experience/knowledge regarding D-1 academic schools making offers contingent on SAT/ACT scores?

Example: A 2019 prospect has a 4.0 GPA but has not yet taken SAT/ACT or the first test he took did not result in a a very high score. Aside form Ivy League, will some academic schools offer contingent on those scores going up?

I would think it's tricky for the academic school coaches as a prospect may have a couple of options at solid schools that do not require an SAT/ACT score that "University of Academic" requires. 

Appreciate the help.

WCP

Offers not necessarily but the amount of offer, absolutely.   I was informed about 4 years ago from multiple colleges that a lot of schools are making offers based off of it because it is a score that is understandable.  What I mean by that is the coaches know what they are getting.  When they see transcripts that say 4.3 with 4 AP classes and low SAT scores they have been burned to many times with those kids.  A lot of colleges privately ignore the extra point for AP and just focus on the actual GPA when they make decisions.  Other people might have different stories.  I am stating this from the stand point of a HS Coach being told this by multiple coaches and multiple levels.

I can confirm that the Ivys care about the unweighted GPA, not the weighted GPA.  My son has been talking to several Ivys and without exception when he responded with his weighted GPA, they asked for the unweighted GPA. They seem to be looking for 3.7 or above, by the way.  They also consistently say 6-8 AP classes through senior year.  Agree with above comments on ACT/SAT scores and AI.  

In a conversation son had with Yale RC he said minimum of 5 AP's, but he pushed his recruits to take as many as they could.  5 became son's template - he received positive pre reads with three Ivy admissions.

Just adding to the context - important for kids to ask early in the process.

This might be useful to folks. If you want to calculate your son's Academic Index for the Ivies (176 is the absolute floor, BTW), here's a roughly accurate way to do it:

(1) ACT score x 2.23, plus (2) Unweighted GPA x 20, plus (3) the average of his SAT subject tests divided by 10.

So if, for example, your son has an unweighted GPA of 3.4, got a 29 on the ACT, and got a 550 and 590 on two SAT subject tests, his Academic Index would be: 65 + 68 + 57 = 190

As with all things academic, the higher the better.

2019DAD - thanks. Chest pumping...NTGson never gave any thought to Ivies....but now I know why they kept contacting him....225.07 was his AI following your formula. (ACT 34/GPA 3.9/SAT ave. 712.5)...He's recovering from throwing shoulder labrum surgery, minor according to surgeon, less than 5 months from surgery before he started throwing bullpens again. Hopefully no medical redshirt this season.

A few more Ivy points not to hijack this thread however:

- Some schools do not offer APs so there is NO universal rule of having to take x number by the Ivies.  As you can see from the Academic Index, GPA feeds in, but rigor does not.  Clearly demonstrated rigor (like AP or honors classes) can help the admissions office overlook some lower grades however...

- The AI formula is supposedly secret, though it has been given out by a certain RC of one of the Ivies in the past few years.  The formula may change so use what has been posted as guidance and not something necessarily set in stone

- Ivies, and other high academic schools, have to spread a very wide net to ensure they can get the level of baseball they are looking for, along with the needed academic credentials.  Contact by Ivies has to be put in context.  They will keep quite a few in the "stable" while they pursue specific recruits.  If they are not texting or calling, be careful in thinking you are near the top of the boards.  Two Ivies in particular have RCs that respond immediately to emails.  They are just professionals, and good communicators.  Not necessarily recruiting you yet.

- Remember there are no scholarships at the Ivies, not for athletics and no merit aid.  Only need based financial aid, so make sure this works for your family as you move down the recruiting path.

 

 

Gov posted:
Midwest Mom posted:
IEBSBL posted:
WestCoastPapa posted:

Does anyone have experience/knowledge regarding D-1 academic schools making offers contingent on SAT/ACT scores?

Example: A 2019 prospect has a 4.0 GPA but has not yet taken SAT/ACT or the first test he took did not result in a a very high score. Aside form Ivy League, will some academic schools offer contingent on those scores going up?

I would think it's tricky for the academic school coaches as a prospect may have a couple of options at solid schools that do not require an SAT/ACT score that "University of Academic" requires. 

Appreciate the help.

WCP

Offers not necessarily but the amount of offer, absolutely.   I was informed about 4 years ago from multiple colleges that a lot of schools are making offers based off of it because it is a score that is understandable.  What I mean by that is the coaches know what they are getting.  When they see transcripts that say 4.3 with 4 AP classes and low SAT scores they have been burned to many times with those kids.  A lot of colleges privately ignore the extra point for AP and just focus on the actual GPA when they make decisions.  Other people might have different stories.  I am stating this from the stand point of a HS Coach being told this by multiple coaches and multiple levels.

I can confirm that the Ivys care about the unweighted GPA, not the weighted GPA.  My son has been talking to several Ivys and without exception when he responded with his weighted GPA, they asked for the unweighted GPA. They seem to be looking for 3.7 or above, by the way.  They also consistently say 6-8 AP classes through senior year.  Agree with above comments on ACT/SAT scores and AI.  

In a conversation son had with Yale RC he said minimum of 5 AP's, but he pushed his recruits to take as many as they could.  5 became son's template - he received positive pre reads with three Ivy admissions.

Just adding to the context - important for kids to ask early in the process.

This is my bad, Gov. 4-6 APs is what we’ve heard. Must have had a brain cramp on 6-8. Agree with TwoBoys that not all schools have AP. It’s just another signal that can be common across schools. 

edcoach posted:

what ACT score is needed for an IVY? what about Stanford?  How close is a 28?  Im assuming ivy's and stanford want a 30 minimum?

Speaking from knowledge based on a buddy whose son just committed to Stanford as a sophomore (2020), it is contingent on several factors. The son already has a 4.0 GPA but Stanford does work with his counselor on his curriculum for the next two years to ensure that he is taking courses that will prepare him for Stanford academia. He also has to achieve a minimum on either standardized test he takes (I did not ask the scores).

My son has not taken the SATs as a junior (he is taking them in March) and his offers are all considered "soft" at the academic schools that he has been in contact with. They have asked for a 1250 on the SATs or a 26/27 on ACTs based on his GPA of 3.6. Many of these schools only have 5 or 6 scholarships to spread around so they ask the boys for these scores knowing that there is other academic money they are pair with a partial (25% min) that gives them a better chance to securing the player.

I really have to give it to these coaches. They have to carry a calculator in their pocket at all times. We had to fill out multiple financial aid forms prior to our visits.

Twoboys posted:

So don't think that somehow HPY have a higher floor.  I think it was Yale who had a 27 or 28 recruit last year.  We have seen 26s at Ivies.  Yes more likely to see higher scores, but there are outliers.  The lower scores just mean a lower Academic Index which means the coach has to get someone higher to help balance it out.  There is a team index that fits into the overall college index.  Teams like football and hockey have a lower index than say crew or tennis.   Tucker Frawley the Yale RC says very publicly that Yale baseball has a 31 average.  That means one kid could have a 35 and another a 27.  

 

HYP do, in fact, have higher floors.  If you think otherwise, you are simply misinformed.  AI formula (which by the way is no secret, one can Google search for it and find an actual spreadsheet that caclulates is as well as articles that lay out the formula) is the same for all, but the band or mid-point of the acceptable AI (the “average of the portfolio”, if you will) is higher for HYP.  There are articles that have been available online for years that speak to this as well.  I also know this from first hand, black and white experience.  PM me if you want more on this.  Each class, for each sport, is a “portfolio” and yes, if a player is well above the targeted average, then that provides “AI budget” (a term that is actually used) to allocate to another player (let’s say some stud LHP who throws 90 but has a lower set of academic measurables - SAT, GPA, etc.).  But, the targeted average AI is certainly not the same school by school. 

Mama007 posted:

This is a great thread for those who have worked hard, done well in school, and are interested in a top-notch education.  Any anecdotes re desired ACT score for Notre Dame or Columbia?  

ND and Columbia have different time lines for recruiting, as well as flexibility with admissions.  In the end you and your son need to have perspective of his abilities so that you can craft a recruiting plan according to your son's abilities, grades, and goals.

The best way for you to get dialed in:  search button above right - Ivy's, Academic Index, Academic D1's, Power conference academics....  Tons of experiences shared and discussed.  With this you'll gain a lot of perspective to assist your son.  This is a great board with kids playing at high level schools as well as being drafted: Power D 1's, MLB, D3 academics to Juco... (not in any necessary order, diff kids diff fits).

Keep in mind: regardless of the level of school, the baseball coaches are looking for baseball players.  Whether a kid has a 32 ACT or a 24...coaches are looking for the best player and hoping for a fit academically. 

No coach wants to be concerned about the academics of a rostered player.  Either he's a hitter or a pitcher...

QUESTION :  What's the first thing an RC says to a recruit he likes ? 

ANSWER: " Tell me about your GPA and Test Scores?"

 

A  2019 who aspires to play at a High Academic school and doesn't have acceptable standardized test score results is late. If the test scores are bad. It's time to spend the money on a tutor and get busy. Now .

My son was recruited and passed a pre-read w/an Ivy with a 27 ACT

He was not a good test taker. He is a red shirt Freshman at a High Academic in the South and I still cringe at the money I spent on private SAT / ACT tutors .

 

 

 

Bucs is spot on.  It was our experience over the last few years with our 2018, that HYP have a higher academic bar (higher AI) for their baseball recruits.  I would say 30+ ACT for HYP and 26+ for the others (Wharton at 30).  Son was focused on Ivy schools and other high academic D1s (Northwestern, Duke, etc) and had a good experience with the schools communicating to him early in the process where the test score and grades/AP classes needed to be for an offer.  Our son took the ACT early, posted a high score (in the 30s), so we were confident that test threshold was met as he received offers.  The Ivys typically do a very good job of not making offers until the test scores have been met, and the path for keeping a strong GPA is clear.   All the Ivy offers I am aware of have only been made after the "pre-read" is done by their admissions office, so getting that blessing should give some good comfort.  

After our son received an Ivy offer during his junior year, it was made very clear by the HC that he needed to continue to perform academically - in his case that meant continued good grades in AP classes since his test score was good.  Clearly the final admission to the school was a decision to be made by the admissions office, not the baseball program, so no letting up on academics.  The AI score for the player is extremely important, so any material reduction in the score (or behavior issues) would put the offer at risk.  

I recently heard of a local player losing his offer from a very high academic school (non-Ivy) after being committed for over a year due to failing to meet the admission requirements (a higher risk when committing to a school so early in high school).  So in this case, yes, his offer was contingent on achieving a certain test score.

So much great information on this site that helped us through the process.  Kudos to all of your sharing your wisdom and experiences.

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