Question about Bat Speed (Tee Exit Velocity)

Jolietboy - Heard a hilarious interview with Don Cooper on the radio the other day where he minimized some of the guys pitching in their organization's velocity.  He said give me a guy who throws strikes and changes speeds over a guy who throws hard every time.  

 

I will sit back and await the White Sox drafting my 78-83mph guys this June.  

Originally Posted by BCRockets:

       

Jolietboy - Heard a hilarious interview with Don Cooper on the radio the other day where he minimized some of the guys pitching in their organization's velocity.  He said give me a guy who throws strikes and changes speeds over a guy who throws hard every time.  

 

I will sit back and await the White Sox drafting my 78-83mph guys this June.  


       
Die hard sox fan.  Love coop.  And that seems to be a popular thing to say always but oddly enough the sox (with plenty of input from coop I am sure) keep going after mid 90's guys!  I also have a couple really good pitchers where I coach in that 78-83 range...  perhaps I should give coop a call!!

Good tips here, son worked on heavy bat, light bat etc.

17 years old (young senior)

recently at a pro workout  hit 93 wood

and then a showcase hit 95 mph with wood & an old metal bat,

highest anyone did at that winter Pro showcase was 100 mph.

Top ranked players there.

(line drive off tee)

 

Son's longest homerun distance measured to date 418 ft, (most  unmeasured, off school etc).

I would think some players scorching a double might be faster velo than some homeruns.

Wish the high school used the technology PG mentions, particularly on one that got out in a snap

(scouts there to see another older good player player quoted different speeds. under 2 seconds etc.)

 

PG might know this: Is there a technology / tool to measure Time to leave the field, cross the fence?

 

Another chart on this measure (time to leave park) would be very interesting to see.

 

 

Originally Posted by ADOLAN99MOM:

       

My son is 15 and a High School Sophmore he was just evualated by his travel team and had a Bat exit Speed of 88 MPH. He is a power hitter and big 6/1" 200#. Is this something that they take seriously at showcases?

 


       
Yes very seriously
Originally Posted by ADOLAN99MOM:

My son is 15 and a High School Sophmore he was just evualated by his travel team and had a Bat exit Speed of 88 MPH. He is a power hitter and big 6/1" 200#. Is this something that they take seriously at showcases?

 

 

It's only one piece of a larger puzzle.  A good piece, but it's what you do with it in games (along with many other skills) that will matter more.

 

And keep in mind that many showcases do not seek or record the exit velocity number, so how a player does in BP and games will be important.

 

 

I am no showcase expert but I would find it hard to believe there are showcases who don't look at exit velocity.   While PBR puts it up front in the basic profile PG does not that I can see but I would be pretty sure all of them have access to it.
Originally Posted by jolietboy:
I am no showcase expert but I would find it hard to believe there are showcases who don't look at exit velocity.   While PBR puts it up front in the basic profile PG does not that I can see but I would be pretty sure all of them have access to it.

 

Local PG ones do not and son has been to a few college ones, on and off campus, that have not.  Some others do and publicize it.  Many coaches and scouts can tell without seeing a radar gun though, which is why results are important.  

 

As I'm sure you have, I have seen a few that have the bat speed (and would have good exit velocity), but can't hit water if they fell out of a boat.  So the good exit velocity doesn't help them.  

 

No complaints on my guy, he's in a good spot with that.  Needs to continue working though, as they all do.

 

 

We've been told it is one piece of the puzzle. They want to see if it translates to distance and home runs. So far, so good in son's case.

Power is at a premium seems to be a common comment.

Can they hit an 85-90+ fastball? is another question they want answered.

 

Have to keep improving to compete and excel.

 

Sure, we've seen showcase kids who did not perform in games &/or tourneys.

90 across the diamond though 5+ feet over the 1st baseman's head also.

 

Good luck to all that have green fields now and to the rest of our sons waiting on a Thaw this spring

 

 

Refreshing this topic.  For you folks that have already been through the recruiting process/showcases, and exit velocity testing.  Am hoping for your thoughts.  Did you notice that some with not so good swings, had better exit velocities than those with a more solid swing?  Did you notice that a high exit velocity does not always translate into actual "game" power/performance?  I am just starting to see some of the kids we have played with over the years, beginning the showcase circuit.   We have known many of these kids, and how they perform in games, as many of you have known and seen as you went through this same process.  I see where some that struggle in games are getting high exit velocity ratings.  Not all, but some.  Conversely, some of the better "game" players (and better swing mechanics and approach) were not quite as high.  Curious as to how much stock the actual coaches put into this measurement.  My 2018 actually does okay with this (87 mph as a 2018), but is a couple MPH under some kids, that I would not have expected.  Size of the body seems to correlate to a higher exit speed for some, but not all.  Just curious.  Be gentle.  Thanks!

Ohio Dad: I think it's importance is really related to the position and type of hitter the player is.  A power hitter should have a higher bat speed.  Those with a higher bat speed (in a drill), may not shine in a game at the same showcase. I have seen many hitters in showcases swing from their heels in skills sets(home run derby-like) and go K-K-K in a game, especially with a number of showcases starting with a 1-1 count. Body size does seem to play a factor. Incidentally FWIW, when my son's D1 program measured bat speed/exit velocity on the entire team a week or two ago..the highest score was by a PO.

 

Ohio Dad posted:

Curious as to how much stock the actual coaches put into this measurement.  My 2018 actually does okay with this (87 mph as a 2018), but is a couple MPH under some kids, that I would not have expected.  

IMO, it means very little to them in the grand scheme of things. At most a high number might make them a little curious to take a look with their own eyes if they see that on a resume. Conversely, if they see a kid live and like his swing, they're not going to care if he has a low PBR number. 

It only Shows Raw batspeed, which of course helps but not if the swing is long and wide. Off a tee that long swing can produce high batspeed.

still of course high speed means that you have good physical ability just like a big fastball shows physical ability but doesn't mean you can pitch. Still all things being equal or course higher velo is better, even if you can't hit that well recruiters might believe they can still teach you to hit or pitch if the raw power is there. But at some point of course you have to prove that your tools transfer to game play.

Are you allowed to adjust the height of the tee at a showcase and if so would there be an optimal height ? Not sure if it would make of a difference. But if you can squeeze anything out of a small adjustment to the tee height seems worth it . Is it their natural swing height, a high meaty fastball height or something low ( I've read some of the highest exit velos are ground ball hits) . I know they want to make solid contact. So we will say all of the choices involve solid contact.

MidAtlanticDad posted:
Ohio Dad posted:

Curious as to how much stock the actual coaches put into this measurement.  My 2018 actually does okay with this (87 mph as a 2018), but is a couple MPH under some kids, that I would not have expected.  

IMO, it means very little to them in the grand scheme of things. At most a high number might make them a little curious to take a look with their own eyes if they see that on a resume. Conversely, if they see a kid live and like his swing, they're not going to care if he has a low PBR number. 

I think it matters a lot.  We have had this conversation before. A good exit cell does not guarantee success but a poor one just about guarantees failure. 87 is good enough if other things fall in line. Sort of like a 78mph pitcher.  Scouts are not interested. The 88mph guys meet the threshold but then are separated by other factors.  

ADOLAN99MOM posted:

My son is 15 and a High School Sophmore he was just evualated by his travel team and had a Bat exit Speed of 88 MPH. He is a power hitter and big 6/1" 200#. Is this something that they take seriously at showcases?

 

IT's a measurable that will get attention.  BUT, when they look at video they'll examine his fundamentals. Big kid, keep developing skill and improving athleticism.  Next test his how his swing holds up in a game against advanced pitching.  

For perspective: son has teammate (2018) who just hit 93 exit velo; impressive.  But zero approach at the plate, he lacks consistency of getting the ball in play with a good hard hit, he's always swinging for the fences.

Keep on working and having fun.

 

Agree...I've seen videos of kids hitting exit velos in the mid to high 90's but it is with a HUGE windup, leg kick, etc...definitely not an "In Game" swing...but then again, recruiters sometimes only see the number so i guess in the long run as long as you keep an In Game swing during BP and games, then the exit velo can be whatever it takes

 

FWIW, data from PG for 2016 regarding tee exit velocity:

2017 class in 2016: best was 104; average was 82

2018 class in 2016: best was 99; average was 80

2019 class in 2016: best was 95; average was 77

2020 class in 2016: best was 94; average was 75

2020dad posted: here is a link that may help.
 
http://www.efastball.com/hitti...-speed-by-age-group/
as others have stated high exit velocity does not guarantee success but low exit velocity does guarantee failure.  Bottom line on exit velo is you need to get that north of 90 mph for D1 baseball.  The chart is a little confusing but basically we are talking 90+ off a tee with a bbcor bat.  If you square the ball up at an astounding rate you may be able to get away with high 80's.  

Here's a kid, Nick Allen, who was drafted in the 3rd Round, with an 82 mph Exit Velocity https://www.perfectgame.org/Pl...ofile.aspx?ID=353981

It is always better to do better with measureables, but the "rules" aren't quite so cut & dry

3and2Fastball posted:
2020dad posted: here is a link that may help.
 
http://www.efastball.com/hitti...-speed-by-age-group/
as others have stated high exit velocity does not guarantee success but low exit velocity does guarantee failure.  Bottom line on exit velo is you need to get that north of 90 mph for D1 baseball.  The chart is a little confusing but basically we are talking 90+ off a tee with a bbcor bat.  If you square the ball up at an astounding rate you may be able to get away with high 80's.  

Here's a kid, Nick Allen, who was drafted in the 3rd Round, with an 82 mph Exit Velocity https://www.perfectgame.org/Pl...ofile.aspx?ID=353981

It is always better to do better with measureables, but the "rules" aren't quite so cut & dry

Nick Allen has a magical glove, strong arm, and great approach at the plate.

Update:  Nick Allen is hitting .208 with a .272 SLG through his first 100 At Bats as a 19 year old in A Ball.  That's OK though, a lot of 18 & 19 year olds struggle in that league (Midwest League) and it is just a small sample of AB's.   He is listed at 5'9" 155 pounds and perhaps the lack of ability to hit for power is one of the reasons why a kid projected to be a 1st Round pick by many slipped to the 3rd Round and is struggling now.

Nowadays the pros seem to want big power out of every position unless you are an absolutely elite Shortstop (which Nick Allen may turn out to be) and even then, many pro teams seems to be sacrificing some defense at short in order to get more pop out of that position.

Makes me wonder if a kid like Nick might've been better off playing in college for 3 years first and developing more strength?

From talking to a lot of scouts, recruiting coordinators and travel program directors, Exit Velocity isn't *that* big of a deal in comparing one player to another provided that the player reaches a minimum benchmark for exit velocity. 

If an athlete doesn't have at least a 90 mph Exit Velocity most pro scouts and D1's will write that player off as "not a prospect at this time", unless they bring something else elite to the table such as a 6.5 sixty or a 90+ mph arm or an incredibly slick glove.

And even low level D3's are looking for 85+ mph exit velos.

If a high school freshman or sophomore isn't hitting those benchmarks yet, that is OK it just shows they need to get into a dedicated strength program and keep working at it.

As mentioned earlier in this thread, you will see players who have the ability to consistently barrel up a ball with a great swing and will hit line drives into the outfield with just a 75-80mph exit velo.  The thing is, as they get higher up in the Baseball world, that lower exit velo swing will never work against pitchers throwing 90+.  The bat speed just isn't quick enough.

A kid who can consistently barrel up 75-83 mph fastballs for 275-300+ feet line drives, in games, with a 75-80mph exit velocity, who then through hard work over a few years gets to a 95+ exit velocity (at the very least 90 mph) while maintaining a great swing?  That is a recipe for success.

 

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×