Sending updates to coaches after a less-than-stellar performance

Son (2019 RHP) is writing his update letter to the coaches that have asked him for updates, and last night things didn't go so well. He knows to post the facts as facts, then add his analysis of what went right/wrong and what he learned from it to help him next time. He knows to focus on his own performance and not blame others, etc.. So far he's got a nice letter drafted up but does anyone have any additional advice on what to add/subtract, focus on or NOT dwell on?

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KilroyJ posted:

Son (2019 RHP) is writing his update letter to the coaches that have asked him for updates, and last night things didn't go so well. He knows to post the facts as facts, then add his analysis of what went right/wrong and what he learned from it to help him next time. He knows to focus on his own performance and not blame others, etc.. So far he's got a nice letter drafted up but does anyone have any additional advice on what to add/subtract, focus on or NOT dwell on?

If my son was writing this letter, I would tell him to be honest.  These coaches know that the kids will struggle at times.  It is a part of the process.  Even the best recruits will have bad games.  I would have him list the facts and then have him explain what he learned from the bad outing.  This would show maturity, and the ability to learn and focus on getting better.

Does he write a report after each game? If it's not required, why write it?

Baseball results are not straight lines on a graph; we all know there are up and downs. If possible, wait to include several games - nothing a 2019 writes on a daily basis will hurt - but having some good results with some lessons learned from lesser results puts more meat on the bones. 

These coaches have specifically asked for weekly updates and to let them know when he's pitching next, so that's what he's doing- plus one had requested weekly phone calls-  sometimes coach answers the phone, sometimes he doesn't but Son wants to show he's still interested and making the effort!

At least one coach told son that he wants to see him in a game situation, and if he could plan that, he could plan it to be a game where things don't go well. He said "I want to see how you react to that, do you hang your head, do you stay focused, etc? I know you can pitch when things are going well. How do you handle it when things aren't?"

I think the idea is a good one — it makes a kid reflect on his performance and learn to think about what goes wrong, without hopefully dumping on himself.

 

How about focus on the positive?

"Even though I only got 4Ks yesterday against Rival High School, we got the win and I was able to throw a complete game and still keep my pitch count under 85 over 7 innings. "

Or something like that.

Do what everybody in the working world does - Make lemonade!

Your son is a 2019, and he already has such strong interest that coaches really do expect weekly updates?

A bad night by a legit sophomore prospect won't scare anyone off. 

Just own it and move on.

He'll have plenty more chances to show what he can do.

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