So close to a successful appeal

Last night, with a runner on third and one out, the batter hit a medium-deep fly to left field.

I had the plate, so I lined up the catch and the tag. I was 100% sure the runner didn't leave early. 

After the runner scored, the defensive team's coach called out to his pitcher to appeal the play. 

Ball was still live, so he threw to third and said he wanted to appeal. 

"Appeal what?" I asked. 

"That the runner left early."

I gave the safe sign. 

After the game, my partner asked why I asked for the clarification of what was being appealed when it was so obvious.

"Because the runner failed to touch the plate."

Original Post
Swampboy posted:

Last night, with a runner on third and one out, the batter hit a medium-deep fly to left field.

I had the plate, so I lined up the catch and the tag. I was 100% sure the runner didn't leave early. 

After the runner scored, the defensive team's coach called out to his pitcher to appeal the play. 

Ball was still live, so he threw to third and said he wanted to appeal. 

"Appeal what?" I asked. 

"That the runner left early."

I gave the safe sign. 

After the game, my partner asked why I asked for the clarification of what was being appealed when it was so obvious.

"Because the runner failed to touch the plate."

LOL, that was funny!

We had an appeal issue a couple of games ago. Same deal, first and third. Batter lifts a fly ball to right. Kid on third tags and scores. My son, on first, thought there were two away and took off on contact. He stopped at second when he figured it out. The opposing team, not quite getting how appeals work in hs, waits for the ball to return to the mound and then has the pitcher step off and throw to first. My son, realizing, finally, what's happening, starts hoofing it back to first. The pitcher then lofts the ball to the fence and it ricochets off to right field. The right fielder then throws the ball into left field, son takes off for third. The left fielder then airmails it into the stands and he scores. Talk about your appeal gone wrong.

roothog66 posted:

We had an appeal issue a couple of games ago. Same deal, first and third. Batter lifts a fly ball to right. Kid on third tags and scores. My son, on first, thought there were two away and took off on contact. He stopped at second when he figured it out. The opposing team, not quite getting how appeals work in hs, waits for the ball to return to the mound and then has the pitcher step off and throw to first. My son, realizing, finally, what's happening, starts hoofing it back to first. The pitcher then lofts the ball to the fence and it ricochets off to right field. The right fielder then throws the ball into left field, son takes off for third. The left fielder then airmails it into the stands and he scores. Talk about your appeal gone wrong.

Under OBR, once the pitcher has the ball on the rubber, the runner cannot (legally) attempt to return to first.  I forget whether that same restriction applies to FED.

noumpere posted:
roothog66 posted:

We had an appeal issue a couple of games ago. Same deal, first and third. Batter lifts a fly ball to right. Kid on third tags and scores. My son, on first, thought there were two away and took off on contact. He stopped at second when he figured it out. The opposing team, not quite getting how appeals work in hs, waits for the ball to return to the mound and then has the pitcher step off and throw to first. My son, realizing, finally, what's happening, starts hoofing it back to first. The pitcher then lofts the ball to the fence and it ricochets off to right field. The right fielder then throws the ball into left field, son takes off for third. The left fielder then airmails it into the stands and he scores. Talk about your appeal gone wrong.

Under OBR, once the pitcher has the ball on the rubber, the runner cannot (legally) attempt to return to first.  I forget whether that same restriction applies to FED.

No time had been called, so the ball was in play, uninterrupted, if that matters. Do you know, off hand, the OBR rule on that? Assuming the same for FED, how should this have been handled. Once the ball sailed over F3's head, has the defense lost the ability to appeal or can they chase it down and make the appeal? Is the runner out? 

Swampboy posted:

In FED, the opportunity to attempt to return ends when the ball becomes dead. 

That was my take. In fact, I used to teach my base runners that if they knew they had left early and time had been called, they needed to take off to the next base when the ball was put back in play and hope they can draw a play. 

roothog66 posted:

No time had been called, so the ball was in play, uninterrupted, if that matters. Do you know, off hand, the OBR rule on that? Assuming the same for FED, how should this have been handled. Once the ball sailed over F3's head, has the defense lost the ability to appeal or can they chase it down and make the appeal? Is the runner out? 

OBR Rule: 

Rule 5.06(a)/5.06 (c) Comment (Rule 7.01 Comment): If a
runner legally acquires title to a base, and the pitcher assumes
his pitching position, the runner may not return to a previously
occupied base.

And, here's Evans' interpretation:

Umpires should be alert and declare out any runner who should return to his previous base after the pitcher has
assumed his position on the rubber. This could most logically happen when the runner felt that he "left too soon"
on a tag-up and would attempt to return before an appeal was made on him.

The instructions are for the umpire to call time and to declare the runner out.  I agree FED DOES NOT have a similar rule (until the ball becomes dead).

 

On the overthrow (and ignoring the "attempt to return" issue) -- once the ball went OOP, the defense loses it's right to appeal in OBR.  The defense does not lose that right in FED. (And, the defense loses that right once the runner advances in NCAA -- even if the ball remained on the field.)

roothog66 posted:
Swampboy posted:

In FED, the opportunity to attempt to return ends when the ball becomes dead. 

That was my take. In fact, I used to teach my base runners that if they knew they had left early and time had been called, they needed to take off to the next base when the ball was put back in play and hope they can draw a play. 

That's not going to help in FED (or NCAA) (well, assuming the defense knows the rule) -- if the offense initiates a play, the defense does NOT lose the right to appeal.

noumpere posted:
roothog66 posted:
Swampboy posted:

In FED, the opportunity to attempt to return ends when the ball becomes dead. 

That was my take. In fact, I used to teach my base runners that if they knew they had left early and time had been called, they needed to take off to the next base when the ball was put back in play and hope they can draw a play. 

That's not going to help in FED (or NCAA) (well, assuming the defense knows the rule) -- if the offense initiates a play, the defense does NOT lose the right to appeal.

No. This was back in youth ball under OBR rules.

Add Reply

Likes (1)
MidAtlanticDad
×
×
×
×