Straight 108- Game Grading applied to MLB

Someone very close to me (our son ) has just launched a new website which will, primarily, focus on the San Francisco Giants and each game they play during the 2017 season.  Necessarily, the site will include information on each opponent over that 162 game (and hopefully post-season) schedule.

The focus of the site is to provide individual game and player grades coupled with accumulated information as the season progresses, presented for  the every day fan .  What is quite different and unique about the site will be the approach to game and player analysis.  The grading and analysis won't be done from either the sabermetric or purist perspective.  It will be done with our son's unique approach to  game grading, using his proprietary algorithm.

For those with son's heading to or playing in college, some of the concepts used in the game grading approach are used by college coaches in their evaluation and grading of  the performance of their players. Having read so many posts on this site, especially about perceptions during Fall ball at the college level, this item from the 108 site might very much be of interest to those who read and post here on why coaches may well see things in a very different way than those looking from a different perspective :

"Straight 108 values a hitter who is hitting .200 but hits the ball consistently hard more than someone hitting .300 as a result of good luck. In assessing a player on how they perform based on controllable outcomes (ex. balls hit hard vs. hits) and their ability help their team win in ways that don’t show up in a stat or box score, we’ll be able to determine overall player value and performance more accurately."

This is the link to Straight 108, which I hope many on the HSBBW will find a daily source of information to enhance their knowledge of the game, with associated additional enjoyment of the 2017 season.

 

http://straight108.com/2017/03...ome-to-straight-108/

 

 

'You don't have to be a great player to play in the major leagues, you've got to be a good one every day.'

Original Post

Straight108 highlights this hitting video/interview with Josh Donaldson to emphasize some approaches to be successful:

" One of the best things about hitting is that everyone has a different style. The idea isn't for everyone to hit like Josh Donaldson - it's to be the best version of yourself you can be. Part of building the foundation is taking bits and pieces from hitters you like, and trying to incorporate them into your swing. Some might work, others might not. But hitting is a constant work in progress - even the best never master it"

 

https://www.facebook.com/straight108/

 

 

IFD - just a brief note to let you know that your son's newsletter has become required reading for me on the morning after SFG games, and he is really crushing it in his deeper analysis on the website.  

Definitely a must read for Giants fans.

JCG, thank you for the very nice (and supportive) post!   It seems like Straight108 is getting traction.

I am certainly watching games, AB's etc through  entirely new filters!

As  a parent and also a huge baseball fan, reading each update is pretty darn gratifying.  Each update seems to reflect the love and passion our son has  for the game. His analysis,  especially, reflects the depth of his knowledge, insight and ability to apply how  much he learned about the game and the way it needs to be played at the highest levels. 

I think many parents of HS players, and especially HS players looking to play in college, could learn many of the expectations which college coaches will have for their sons at the next level.  If nothing else, the daily updates confirm the detail with which coaches watch and analyze every  pitch of each game.

Great stuff IFD! Congrats. Love the information,  he just needs to add the Dodgers to the site!

This is really a really good read for HS parents who want to understand why a college may or may not be interested in their son "when he is batting 0.400" and why the typical statistics kept in HS mean nothing to college coaches.

Thanks for posting this.  

 

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MidAtlanticDadJCG
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