Wearing wrist bands with signals on them.

Nuke83 posted:

Not sure, but it's obnoxious as hell listening to HS coaches yell out numbers before every pitch.

My sons HS Coach does it, ugh! After 2 games of it I now sit down the line somewhere so I can’t hear it. Bout to be on year 3 in a few months 

We played a team a few years back where the pitcher put his "game card" in his cap.  The coach would yell out the numbers, everyone else would do the wrist review and the pitcher would literally take off his cap and stare into it for a few seconds then put it back on his head.  Talk about a slow game.

TPM posted:

Get used to it they do it in college. But the coaches give signs for the numbers and also helps in preventing stealing signs.

That's what I've seen for the most part, and when the players get used to it, the game just rocks right along.  

I would imagine it would cut down missing signals a great deal. I've never used them in baseball (though I did use a number system just no wristbands) I have however used them for many years with a no huddle offense in youth football. Way better than signals but football has built in time to read the wristbands baseball doesn't. I don't understand the wrist bands in baseball.  A number system that can't be figured out by the other coach is easy enough without the wristbands. 

Stats4Gnats posted:

Does wearing wrist bands with the signals on them cut down on the missed signals? 5 years ago I’d see 1 or 2 teams a season who did it, but now I’m guessing a third of them do.

 

Yes. Very much so. We may have 1 or 2 missed signs a year now tops.

Scotty83 posted:

 I don't understand the wrist bands in baseball.  A number system that can't be figured out by the other coach is easy enough without the wristbands. 

Can you explain an example? I'm not sure how to do that, but if it's possible I'd love to hear the explanation.

ironhorse posted:
Scotty83 posted:

 I don't understand the wrist bands in baseball.  A number system that can't be figured out by the other coach is easy enough without the wristbands. 

Can you explain an example? I'm not sure how to do that, but if it's possible I'd love to hear the explanation.

You just use one number per action. Like 1 for steal with a take. Then change which spot in the order the number with meaning is. Ex. If it's the first number then call out 137. If the second number 317 or third 371. The 1 told them what to do. Depending on the other coach and how the games going sometimes you have to change it a lot some times only once a game. I've had a couple teams have trouble with it at the start of the season. So I had a dry erase board in the dugout only my players could see then every inning write down which action number it would be. In the rare occasion say we had a lot of steals or bunts in an inning the any same number all three times, like 444 or 777, meant move the action number up one. It really doesn't matter if every coach in the district knows 1 means steal. If they gear up for a steal every time you call a 1 then just put a 1 in every number you call just in a nonaction spot in the order. 

Its also pretty easy to bait a coach that thinks he has it figured out. I actually got a coach once that got all caught up in it to walk a kid with pitchouts trying to catch a kid stealing lol. 

My sons freshman year he played another HS, and both coaches did the wristguards thing, and every pitch they would call out numbers.

We were hanging out with a dad from the other team who my son had played summer ball  when he yelled out...... BINGO!!!! you coaches just called all the numbers on my Bingo card!!

Needless to say everyone the stands started laughing.  

The vast majority of college teams I know will use the wrist band for calling pitches and defensive signals. The coach doesn't yell out he just flashes the numbers example 3 - 2 - 1 and that's it. As far as base runners most I watch still use an indicator and signs. I thought the wrist band deal was going to take over but I'm seeing more go back to traditional signs for baserunners now. 

Yelling out numbers the entire game probably got old for these coaches. I know that I found it annoying but to each his own. It may be different for you other people but I am seeing less of it not more. As far as baserunners. 

Scotty83 posted:
ironhorse posted:
Scotty83 posted:

 I don't understand the wrist bands in baseball.  A number system that can't be figured out by the other coach is easy enough without the wristbands. 

Can you explain an example? I'm not sure how to do that, but if it's possible I'd love to hear the explanation.

You just use one number per action. Like 1 for steal with a take. Then change which spot in the order the number with meaning is. Ex. If it's the first number then call out 137. If the second number 317 or third 371. The 1 told them what to do. Depending on the other coach and how the games going sometimes you have to change it a lot some times only once a game. I've had a couple teams have trouble with it at the start of the season. So I had a dry erase board in the dugout only my players could see then every inning write down which action number it would be. In the rare occasion say we had a lot of steals or bunts in an inning the any same number all three times, like 444 or 777, meant move the action number up one. It really doesn't matter if every coach in the district knows 1 means steal. If they gear up for a steal every time you call a 1 then just put a 1 in every number you call just in a nonaction spot in the order. 

Its also pretty easy to bait a coach that thinks he has it figured out. I actually got a coach once that got all caught up in it to walk a kid with pitchouts trying to catch a kid stealing lol. 

I gotcha, but doesn't that limit you to only be able to have 10 "things" to put on?

And kids have to memorize those 10?

adbono posted:
D1catcher posted:

I've used one since highschool. Coach flashes numbers, look at wristband, call the pitch. 

Takes about 10 seconds

Can you recommend a brand?  Also would appreciate your input on any particulars.

We use Neumann ones now. There's was a weird consolation in the wristband industry apparently a few years ago that made it hard to get anything else. Been happy with them.  We give the kids 1-pane wristbands and the coaches have 3-pane wristbands to carry a little more info.

We have used wristbands for 9 years now at the high school level, kids started to not understand hand signs something simple such as touches to the box (touches to chest and stomach).  We use own the Zone and for some reason we might miss 2 signs all year.  We use the same cards on offense, we have a new card for each game, we use it by never calling the same number twice, it works as we want to hit and run, there are 20 sets of three number sequence that work for hit and run such as 345 the players look down see two letters such as SQ and it tells them its a hit and run.  We don't yell numbers and I will even go as far as to say it will take a below average coach and make him better as he now has to think about scenarios before they happen and if a pitch is a ball or strike and the count and possible count and who is on and who is on deck and what the defensive team does and who the pitcher is and how he is throwing.  Its not complicated and players get it. We also have quick signs body indicators for times where our numbers dont mean anything or we dont want to give numbers, they are a single touch to the body, such as a nonchalant touch to the nose could be steal. 

We use Nuemann wrist bands but the own the zone software and like I said 9 years of using it and yes I learned about it from college coaches. Who use it for offense, pitching and defensive scenarios.  

ironhorse posted:

And for the record, we don't yell out numbers. We still use an indicator and spots on the body to represent numbers. Although, with some of our non-honor student kids I've been known to yell them out.

True story: I once literally yelled from the third base box, "Tyler!!!!! You are stealing! On the next pitch!" Great kid, understood the signs...he just forgot them between the time he acknowledged them and the actual pitch happened. He was one of those kids that very frequently got caught up watching the game while he was supposed to be playing the game.

(Believe it or not, he was safe on the steal. Defense froze. Probably thinking there was no possible way that the steal was actually on.)

As for the cards: never used them, never liked the shouting out of numbers and whatnot, and just one more thing to have to bring along and keep organized on game day. I totally get that they can be very effective--but I rarely called the pitches (I had a catcher for that), and never felt that the defense needed to be so complicated that a few simple gestures (signs) couldn't suffice. Same with offense. If I really needed to do something exotic, I could just ask Blue for time...

-42

4T2 posted:

True story: I once literally yelled from the third base box, "Tyler!!!!! You are stealing! On the next pitch!" Great kid, understood the signs...he just forgot them between the time he acknowledged them and the actual pitch happened. He was one of those kids that very frequently got caught up watching the game while he was supposed to be playing the game.

(Believe it or not, he was safe on the steal. Defense froze. Probably thinking there was no possible way that the steal was actually on.)

 

...

OK, slight side-step from the OP topic but 42's story reminded me of a story I probably told here before...

Moons ago, coaching a youth game (12's/13's ??), I have a player who is the real life version of Forrest Gump.  Very animated, thick glasses, very smart but very not, wore the pants REALLY high, the running form was dead ringer for Gump.

He had to use the restroom mid-game, which was out beyond CF (no fence) at a school.  He is making his way back and is due up to bat.  Everyone yelling for him to hurry, he does his patented sprint straight through the field...  arms pumping high, belt buckle somewhere near the chest, glasses bouncing - all fans, players, umps busting up.  He makes his way to the batters box and catches his breath.  I am coaching third and give him the bunt sign.  Indicator was second sign.  He steps out of the box and motions in a very animated way... to make sure he got the sign right... with wide eyes and an inquisitive look, he flashes two fingers (second sign) and then squares toward me, holding perfect bunting form, in effect confirming with me via his secret code but, at the same time, telling the whole world clearly what he was about to do. 

15 years later, every kid and coach from that team and every parent that was at that game still laughs at that five minutes in time that he gave us.  My guess is he's probably a rocket scientist for NASA now.

ironhorse posted:
Scotty83 posted:
ironhorse posted:
Scotty83 posted:

 I don't understand the wrist bands in baseball.  A number system that can't be figured out by the other coach is easy enough without the wristbands. 

Can you explain an example? I'm not sure how to do that, but if it's possible I'd love to hear the explanation.

You just use one number per action. Like 1 for steal with a take. Then change which spot in the order the number with meaning is. Ex. If it's the first number then call out 137. If the second number 317 or third 371. The 1 told them what to do. Depending on the other coach and how the games going sometimes you have to change it a lot some times only once a game. I've had a couple teams have trouble with it at the start of the season. So I had a dry erase board in the dugout only my players could see then every inning write down which action number it would be. In the rare occasion say we had a lot of steals or bunts in an inning the any same number all three times, like 444 or 777, meant move the action number up one. It really doesn't matter if every coach in the district knows 1 means steal. If they gear up for a steal every time you call a 1 then just put a 1 in every number you call just in a nonaction spot in the order. 

Its also pretty easy to bait a coach that thinks he has it figured out. I actually got a coach once that got all caught up in it to walk a kid with pitchouts trying to catch a kid stealing lol. 

I gotcha, but doesn't that limit you to only be able to have 10 "things" to put on?

And kids have to memorize those 10?

Yes but I don't like to do that much micromanaging in a game so I've never had to use more than 9.

They memorize it pretty easy during the first few practices easier than signals anyway. I also use the same system for calling pitches so the catchers and pitchers have to learn three sets (offensive play, pitch type, pitch location) but it's never been a problem. 

Also I signal with my hands I don't yell out the number. I never liked that. 

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