Reply to "High Academic minimum requirements"

tequila posted:
KLL posted:

Do those kids that get in with the lower scores get enough tutoring help to be able to keep their grades up since they’re in classes geared towards the more academically gifted students or is it a constant struggle to remain eligible and obtain a degree?

Good input on responses to this question so far but I thought I'd add my two cents. My 2019 had 3.6 GPA (with a rigorous schedule), a 31 ACT and, after touring Kenyon, Case, Middlebury, Trinity, Wesleyan, and Tufts, made a comment to me that he didn't want to be the "dumbest" one on campus. I thought that was interesting and a pretty good point, though he likely could have gotten in the door to most of these. I was in that boat at his age, having barely gotten into my #1 school of choice, and it was a rude awakening once I got there. These schools ended up all being well out of our price having not qualified for any need-based financial aid, and merit awards coming in at the most basic level, so the problem took care of itself and he's now bound for what I would call a tier down from these academically but still playing baseball at a very good school in a top D3 conference.

Agreed -- good responses, my two cents is that my kid had a roughly the same HS academics and scores as yours,  but did go to a school in the same tier you mentioned.  After two years, he's not an academic all american or on the deans list, but he's taking very difficult courses with intense work loads, and he's doing fine with a respectable GPA. As for being the dumbest kid on campus, he'd probably say that's the LAX team.  JK - they don't have LAX.

If a kid is willing to work hard and can learn time management, he's well on the way.

Last edited by JCG
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