Tagged With "baseball tryouts dallas"

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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Pitchingfan: Again, coaches are not interested in your son's stats. They need to see him with their own eyes. What does hitting .300 mean? Was it against quality pitching? Does he play in a mecca of great baseball with amazing competition? Does he pitch against the great teams or is he the kid they put in against not so good teams? They do care about metrics. 60 time, exit velo, pitching velocity, different types of pitches, height and weight, grades, test scores, etc. They don't care that...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Thanks for the heads up Desertduck!
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Iowamom23 ·
Who cares where I posted it. That's irrelevant. — iIt's only relevant if you care who reads the article. But what was untrue about the article??? You said most if it was untrue? — Never used the word untrue. Never said most of it or even any of it was untrue. Seems like you are seeking an argument rather than feedback, so I'm done.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
RJM: This is for you bucko! And everyone here knows you have an attitude. I wasn’t going to bother since the errors should be obvious to anyone but a rookie. But I guess I’m being challenged to slice and dice the article. The first section is about kiddie ball. No one becomes a college prospect in kiddie ball on a small field. Most college players were preteen stars. But many preteen stars don’t even make their high school team. Many parents can’t recognize the difference between the...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

RJM ·
Rocky ... There’s so much incorrect in your response you’re not worth the time. However, it did pick up two “likes” quickly on a slow morning. If I want to nitpick the picture in your article is of a D3 signing. D3’s don’t have NLI’s. It’s a staged faux signing to advertise the commitment. I don’t have a problem with high schools and high school athletes doing this. But for an intended informative article it should be a legit NLI signing. Have a nice day. Don’t forget to take your meds.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

JCG ·
"D3: For the most part, these are the most highly academic liberal arts schools. They are often highly selective, and the student population is usually less than 2000. NYU, MIT, and Emory are D3 schools." Interesting that of the three examples you use, none are LAC's and all have enrollment much higher than 2K.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

PitchingFan ·
I'm not trying to argue with you. You asked what people thought? Our experience was with my son and others in my program that coaches wanted to know stats, especially his summer stats against good teams. I think it also depends on what level of recruiting you are talking about. My son was recruited D1 and many of the coaches in SEC, ACC, and Big 10 commented in our personal conversations on his stats against the Big Programs in his summer ball and his high school stats.. It also helped he...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

baseballmom ·
NCSA is not too well thought of around here...Just do a search on topics... It's been many years, but one of their "recruiters" posted a few times...Didn't get much of a welcome mat! Understand Mr Rocky, that this site was created about 20 years ago to do for FREE what you claim a "$$$ervice" did for you... We have an incredibly strong network of posters, who are very willing to help new parents navigate the recruiting process. We have lots of experts!!! Some have had 4 sons, twins, etc. We...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
RJM: Again, about 7% of high school players go on to play college baseball at any level. You probably didn't know that expert. By the way, D3 players (dont know why you are slighting them) do sign commitment letters. see: https://www.nsr-inc.com/scouti...ment-letter-to-sign/ Players that sign D3 commitment letters get full rides to their schools. Unlike D2, D3, NAIA, and JCs, if they decide to stop playing ball, they keep their scholarships. You learn something everyday huh expert? And by...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Baseballmom: NCSA worked for us. Worked for many others. I don't make a dime from them and very little of my article speaks about NCSA. You are the one keying on it. It's just another resource. One of many. I have also been on this site plenty of times over the last couple of years. Some real good information, some well intended, but wrong, and some just disturbingly wrong. By the way, I simply posted an article of what worked for me. Didn't find too much camaraderie, I'm sorry. Just a lot...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Iowamom23 ·
Rocky, I honestly don't care that you will say nasty things about me for posting this, but this is simply too egregious and if someone new read your post they could seriously be led astray. Division 3 schools are not allowed to give athletic scholarships — "Division III schools do not offer athletics scholarships."— NCAA web site, link shown below. http://www.ncaa.org/student-at.../future/scholarships People can sign whatever they want to and have whatever ceremony they want to, and they...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

baseballmom ·
Folks, ...his only posts are this thread...his profile bio: "recruiting junkie"...HMMM, so take it for what it's worth... his opinion...under the guise of selling a recruiting service... Too bad he didn't ask for help a few years ago...those $$'s could have been better spent on skills training, or lessons...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

RJM ·
As I posted before you’re inaccuracies are not worth the response. But the one thing that really validates you don’t have a clue is players don’t sign NLI’s unless they are receiving athletic money. Even D1 recruits not receiving money don’t sign them. Keep it coming You’re entertaining. Don’t forget your meds.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

letsgo!!! ·
......and you would not sign an nli for the ivies.....no athletic $$, no nli....that said, the ivies will give the most reasonable needs based financial aid.....and cant we all just get along...lol.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

anotherparent ·
I'm all in favor of having as many personal experiences available online as possible. People who google "college baseball recruiting" will find your blog entry, will find this site, and will find many other things. Many people (we were certainly among those) will not know anything about the subject, and won't know what to believe. I think that the reason you are being criticized here is that your son is going to play at a D3 school, but you aren't transparent about that in your blog entry.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Iowamom: ahhhh, anyone who has read my article knows I stated D3s don't give "athletic" scholarships. They give academic scholarships. Neither do the Ivy League schools. And I never said "anything nasty" about you. And yes, every signing ceremony is just that...a ceremony.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Baesballmom: LOL. Yes, I get paid. You are funny.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Thanks Anotherparent: Correct, my son will play D3 at a top academic school. Had opportunities to play at other D3, NAIA, JC as well. He has a high SAT/ACT and great grades. Healso was recruited by two D2s, but the school are not as prestigious and the love from the coaches wasn't nearly as much as he got from the school he is going to play for. The money we got was also substantially more than any athletic money we could have gotten elsewhere. We made a decision to focus on D2, D3, and NAIA...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

JCG ·
"By the way, D3 players (dont know why you are slighting them) do sign commitment letters. see: https://www.nsr-inc.com/scouti...ment-letter-to-sign/ " Those are ceremonial only, and I doubt that many schools use them. My son's does not. "Players that sign D3 commitment letters get full rides to their schools." Hahahaha. Do they get a pony too? It would be nice if that was true, but it's not.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Letsgo: You say, "the ivies will give the most reasonable needs based financial aid." They don't differentiate between students and athletes. Ivys go by a simple formula. If you make good money, even though your boy is a stud, expect to play $80,000. You will pay the same any family will pay with the same financial situation. Many D3s can work with parents and will offer specific academic scholarships or grants to help families pay the tuition. I have found D3s have much more leeway than the...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
JCJ: Again, 77% of D3 schools have a student body under 2,999. https://www.ncaa.org/sites/def..._edited_20180119.pdf
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Oh, and for all you high brows who dispute that D3 athletes have signing ceremonies, here you go: https://www.dpsk12.org/dps-sen...ational-signing-day/ Go ahead, disparage them you supportive community, you!
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

RJM ·
Ivys go by a simple formula. If you make good money, even though your boy is a stud, expect to play $80,000. Once again, not true. A family with one kid, a 100K income and 500K in assets pays under 25K per year for Harvard. 125K, under 30K per year. 150K, under 35K per year
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

letsgo!!! ·
I was not insinuating that other schools cannot provide merit based aid..i.e. academic scholarships. I was simply pointing out that as it relates to the "formula" that ivies apply to needs based aid, they are much more generous than most other institutions. At least that was my experience. I think it's important for families to understand if they aren't making six figures the ivies may be more affordable than they could imagine. If you value that type of education/experience it may be worth...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

letsgo!!! ·
I think everyone is splitting hairs on this......I would encourage everyone to have a signing ceremony....its a great accomplishment/milestone. Signing an nli, however, comes with quite a few strings...its at that point that the verbal commitment becomes an actual binding agreement.....that can only be undone with actual reprecusions.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
True Letsgo!!. I agree. Any player who works hard enough to get to play college ball should be celebrated. But yes, once you sign that NLI for a D1 or D2, you are entering in to an agreement that you play for their pay. You quit, there goes your scholarship (for the most part). But with D3s once you are accepted, you can quit down the road, and you will still keep whatever academic dollars they gave you, because it was not an "athletic" scholarship. Coaches will not be too happy though as...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Letsgo!!, I just read your other post. Yes, if you come from a family that is not well off and you have D1 talent, you have the possibility of going for peanuts. I know many players might want to choose an LSU over a Harvard, but man, that Harvard degree will be worth its weight in gold.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

letsgo!!! ·
To keep your athletic $$ you must be a good citizen, stay eligible and not quit.........academic money can have other requirements - maintain specific GPA (mich higher than eligibility). At the end of the day you need to ask questions and read the fine print. The academic money they may show you may only be for one year..or four.....the same can be said for athletic money (although I'm pretty certain p5 must give aid for 4 years)
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
RJM: "Good money" for me is over $200,000. I guess it's all relative. Don't forget to add housing, meal plans, and travel costs. It all adds up.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

JCG ·
All i did was quote you. Unlike you i made no personal, ad hominim attacks. Where are the admins?
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Swampboy ·
The admins are here, and this thread is closed. Rocky, it’s bad form to post a link to an outside source as your first post and then get aggressively defensive when members take the trouble to read your article and share their honest reactions to it. If you want to continue posting here, play more nicely.
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Really.You got a full ride, no college costs?

runitout ·
This is where the rubber hits the road. Baseball at all collegiate levels is a rabbit warren. Paying for college, athlete or not, is daunting. I thought it would be helpful to those who are starting the journey to be aware of the the actual net costs. I saw a very successful coach (multiple sports)from Baltimore with the PCA speak to our LL board. Her succinct advice was less practice more library. So what I hope is that we post the type of school, (D3-2-1, JC, naia, public private and...
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Tryouts for 15U-18U Marshals summer 2018 teams

Marshals Baseball ·
Tryouts for 15U-18U Marshals summer 2018 teams Saturday, September 23 , 2:00 p.m. WHAT: Marshals 15U-18U Tryouts WHEN: Sunday, September 10 TIME: 2:00 P.M. WHERE: Pearce High School 1600 N. Coit Rd., Richardson TX BRING: - Baseball appropriate clothing & gear - Water We are called the McKinney Marshals, but we have teams and athletes across the Metroplex and North Texas. Athletes come to play with us from across the state of Texas and Oklahoma. Teams practice in a variety of locations...
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Marshals Select Baseball Tryouts for 2017 Teams

McKinney Marshals ·
TRYOUTS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17 FOR 2017 MARSHALS SELECT TEAMS Open tryouts for Marshals Baseball Spring/Summer 14U-18U teams continue this weekend. If you are an athlete who is willing to work hard to develop yourself as a player, we can provide a competitive environment to help you reach your goals, whether it is simply to be the best high school player you can be, or to play at the next level. To do this, we believe in fielding a few well-coached teams with quality players to compete in the...
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Premier Summer Teams Tryouts McKinney Marshals

Marshals Baseball ·
Final Tryouts 15U-18U Marshals Summer 2018 teams SUMMER SELECT TEAM TRYOUTS WHAT: Marshals 15U-18U Tryouts WHEN: Saturday, January 20 TIME: 2:00 P.M. WHERE: Richardson Pearce High School Baseball Field 1600 N Coit Rd, Richardson, TX 75080 BRING: - Baseball appropriate clothing & gear - Water We are called the McKinney Marshals, but we have teams and athletes across the Metroplex and North Texas. Athletes come to play with us from across the state of Texas and Oklahoma. Teams practice in...
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Dallas Redhawks Baseball Club - Open Tryouts

drhawks ·
FALL 2016 TRYOUTS AUGUST 12TH (FRIDAY) MOMENTUM TRAINING AND PERFORMANCE CTR - AGES 7U-12U - 6:00 P.M. TO 7:30 P.M. - AGES 13U AND UP - 7:30 P.M. TO 9:00 P.M AUGUST 13TH (SATURDAY) - AGES 7U-12U - 9:00 A.M. TO 10:00 A.M. - AGES 13U AND UP - 10:00 A.M. TO 11:30 A.M. THIS WILL BE INDOOR AND SOME OUTDOOR ON THE TURF. DO NOT WEAR CLEATS, WEAR TENNIS/TURF SHOES AND BASEBALL ATTIRE. BRING PLENTY OF WATER!!! Contact us at dallasredhawks@gmail.com and/or register at www.dallasredhawksbaseball.com
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Housing at a different college

2017_Grad ·
Hello, I don't know if anyone on this site knows or has done it, but I'll ask anyway. Is it possible if you attend classes and play baseball at (College A) but they don't have housing, can you live in a dorm and eat in (College B)? And can the baseball coach communicate that or should I go through the admissions office? Thank you in advance.
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Re: What say you...

Golfman25 ·
go to the one with the better girls.
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Re: What say you...

Go44dad ·
Which one does your son want to go to? I, if 35 years younger, would choose B. Would probably tell my son that if it was his decision. My son just last night had the choice of Freshman A basketball deep on the bench, or Freshman B basketball and most likely start. He took B. But his baseball decision might be different.
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Re: What say you...

Florida State Fan ·
I'll repeat what I learned here. Tell your son to go where he would love to go to school and baseball wasn't in the mix and where they love him back.
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Re: What say you...

bacdorslider ·
School B..... winning tradition is good, playing time is better, playing 4 years and maybe starting a winning tradition at school B priceless.
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Re: What say you...

DesertDuck ·
Pull out a pen and paper & write down ALL the pro's and con's to each option. Analyze & discuss, then ask him to make a decision. My personal choice would be option B.
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Re: What say you...

bigcubbiefan ·
Took the B route many years ago. No regrets. Knew if I went the A route would certainly be a pitcher only and definitely not be a starter until at least junior year. By taking the B route was able to be a two way player, near the top of the conference in innings pitched for three years, was part of team that made conference playoffs 3 of 4 years...school had only been once in history of the school before that, and played for a great man.
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Re: What say you...

Matt Reiland ·
My take would be school B, but that choice includes reasons that I was not mature enough to think about as a senior in HS. In addition to the playing time advantage and starting earlier in his college career, he will also have potential leadership opportunities on the team earlier on. A mentor once told me that good leadership = competence + character. The academics helps to get a leg up on the competence part of the equation; the baseball experience, and how he responds with the potential...
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Re: What say you...

nxt lvl ·
I have to echo the earlier answer given....who has the better lookin girls! lol
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Re: What say you...

Twoboys ·
I always worry (for my 2017 too) when we hear "guarantees" that you would be a starter or get X playing time NOW, up front. How can any coach know? Playing time is earned in my opinion -- and NOT given. A coach, whether a winning program or not, should want to put in the line up that he or she thinks gives the team the best chance to win. My son would plan to make it hard for a coach not to have him in that line up, no matter the preconceived notions. Any coach that is telling my son right...
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Re: What say you...

MidAtlanticDad ·
This part of the description stood out to me: "will likely start all 4 years at their chosen position." I would never make that assumption at any program, especially at D3. If the new coach is going to turn things around, he's going to do it primarily by finding better players. Sounds like school "A" has a track record of developing guys and playing more juniors and seniors. School "B" has no track record, so there is some risk involved. School "B" may still be the better choice, but...
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Re: What say you...

MomLW ·
The above responses are all good. I think I'd encourage my son to carefully consider Option B also because of the opportunity to play more. But, if his intuition causes him to lean toward one or the other (perhaps because of the coach or the school atmosphere or no reason at all), that should weigh heavily. Finally, as a praying person, I'd do a lot of that and encourage my son to do that as well.
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Re: What say you...

CmassRHPDad ·
Do they both pass the Tommy John test? Will he be happier at one or the other if baseball suddenly goes away?
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Re: What say you...

BishopLeftiesDad ·
So I would say go where he will be challenged. That can be choice A or B. Most players want to compete and be challenged. And not just by opposing teams. They want to be challenged by their team mates. one school came ay my son very hard. One of the coaches selling points was, "I cannot promise you will be a starter, but I know the talent I have, and you have more talent, than my current players." He was a new coach for this program, but not new to coaching. He had been a successful...
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