Tagged With "baseball coaches wanted"

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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

PitchingFan ·
I'm not trying to argue with you. You asked what people thought? Our experience was with my son and others in my program that coaches wanted to know stats, especially his summer stats against good teams. I think it also depends on what level of recruiting you are talking about. My son was recruited D1 and many of the coaches in SEC, ACC, and Big 10 commented in our personal conversations on his stats against the Big Programs in his summer ball and his high school stats.. It also helped he...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Iowamom23 ·
Who cares where I posted it. That's irrelevant. — iIt's only relevant if you care who reads the article. But what was untrue about the article??? You said most if it was untrue? — Never used the word untrue. Never said most of it or even any of it was untrue. Seems like you are seeking an argument rather than feedback, so I'm done.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
1. Is this the only place you posted this? It appears to be a jobs web site and I'm not sure that's the right audience for people seeking baseball scholarships. It suggests to me (and I doubt you intended this) that if you don't have a job, a baseball scholarship might be a way to go to help your kid with college. Otherwise, I'm not sure how this is an appropriate venue for the piece. It doesn't appear to be a jobs site, it is a jobs site. Who cares where I posted it. That's irrelevant. I...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
RJM: This is for you bucko! And everyone here knows you have an attitude. I wasn’t going to bother since the errors should be obvious to anyone but a rookie. But I guess I’m being challenged to slice and dice the article. The first section is about kiddie ball. No one becomes a college prospect in kiddie ball on a small field. Most college players were preteen stars. But many preteen stars don’t even make their high school team. Many parents can’t recognize the difference between the...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

RJM ·
And everyone here knows you have an attitude. I wasn’t going to bother since the errors should be obvious to anyone but a rookie. But I guess I’m being challenged to slice and dice the article. The first section is about kiddie ball. No one becomes a college prospect in kiddie ball on a small field. Most college players were preteen stars. But many preteen stars don’t even make their high school team. Many parents can’t recognize the difference between the physical early bloomer of a 5”8”...
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Re: What say you...

Twoboys ·
I always worry (for my 2017 too) when we hear "guarantees" that you would be a starter or get X playing time NOW, up front. How can any coach know? Playing time is earned in my opinion -- and NOT given. A coach, whether a winning program or not, should want to put in the line up that he or she thinks gives the team the best chance to win. My son would plan to make it hard for a coach not to have him in that line up, no matter the preconceived notions. Any coach that is telling my son right...
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Re: What say you...

BishopLeftiesDad ·
So I would say go where he will be challenged. That can be choice A or B. Most players want to compete and be challenged. And not just by opposing teams. They want to be challenged by their team mates. one school came ay my son very hard. One of the coaches selling points was, "I cannot promise you will be a starter, but I know the talent I have, and you have more talent, than my current players." He was a new coach for this program, but not new to coaching. He had been a successful...
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Re: What say you...

IEBSBL ·
Wow, I am a tad bit shocked to read everyone advocating for the easier route. I guess what they say about today's society is true, nobody wants to take the hard road. College athletics is not about just athletics. Based on what OP put I would and I would want my son to attend program A. You are going to learn hard work, you are going to learn tradition, you are going to learn perseverance, you are going to learn patience, you are going to learn how to be a team player. Program B will hand...
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Re: What say you...

mmm1531 ·
I think a lot may have to do with your son's personality. My son hated to lose at anything, he hated for his t ball team to lose, he hated to lose at board games, if his favorite pro sports team lost we knew to give him some space. I saw a video of his college baseball team competing against the lacrosse and hockey team in a fitness test, he wasn't going to let his team lose an event. This winning desire factored in to his decision on where to attend school and play baseball. He didn't want...
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Re: What say you...

old_school ·
occasionally people get hit by lightening bolts and attached by sharks - pretty safe to assume the boy shouldn't be overly concerned about them. Every baseball person I spoken with has said roughly to the same to me, if you don't start or play regular Freshman or sophomore year you most likely won't play at all as an upperclassmen. That includes several college coaches.
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Re: What say you...

Coach_May ·
You just don't know. You can look at every opportunity and try to project where you fit in. You can have a coach tell you "we see you as a starter day one" "we believe you can compete for playing time day one" etc etc. But the fact is you just don't know. You could go to a D1 and play right away. You could choose a D2 and sit. The only thing you can do is go in and compete. You can be the 2nd best catcher in your entire conference and sit behind the best catcher in your conference. And that...
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Re: What say you...

IEBSBL ·
A) You and I know a lot more MLB guys were written off out of HS than Shark Attacks and Lighting. B) What is the purpose of your statement about "Every Baseball Person"? I don't remember nor reading anything I wrote stating that is not true. I don't even remember thinking that, that was not true.
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Getting drafted

Shortstopmonkey ·
Hi! my name is Mohamed Salman and i´m a baseball player from sweden. I´m 20 years old and hopefully after summer semester ill be going to US to play college Baseball. My question is: Will the fact that my name is Mohamed lessen my chance of getting drafted? i´ve had this in my mind for a while now and even considered to change my name. Honestly i´m not even a religious guy but it still is my birth name and so i was afraid that it might lessen the chance of me getting drafted. I really want...
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Re: Getting drafted

jlaro ·
Million Dollar Arm is a film is based on the true story of baseball pitchers Rinku Singh and Dinesh Patel who were discovered by sports agent J.B. Bernstein . What name are thinking about changing it to? Joe Girardi -- Jose perez ?? Make your skills work for you and they will all want to know your name... Good Luck!
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Premier summer teams North Texas - Marshals 15-18U

Marshals Baseball ·
Final Tryouts 15U-18U Marshals Summer 2018 teams SUMMER SELECT TEAM TRYOUTS WHAT: Marshals 15U-18U Tryouts WHEN: Saturday, January 20 TIME: 2:00 P.M. WHERE: Richardson Pearce High School Baseball Field 1600 N Coit Rd, Richardson, TX 75080 BRING: - Baseball appropriate clothing & gear - Water We are called the McKinney Marshals, but we have teams and athletes across the Metroplex and North Texas. Athletes come to play with us from across the state of Texas and Oklahoma. Teams practice in...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

anotherparent ·
I'm all in favor of having as many personal experiences available online as possible. People who google "college baseball recruiting" will find your blog entry, will find this site, and will find many other things. Many people (we were certainly among those) will not know anything about the subject, and won't know what to believe. I think that the reason you are being criticized here is that your son is going to play at a D3 school, but you aren't transparent about that in your blog entry.
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Re: Do Scouts value HS baseball enough for a player to toil In a bad program

2019Dad ·
I heard an interesting twist on the "school program matters" theme from a mid-major pitching coach this winter. He said something like (I'm paraphrasing, but this was the gist): "It's funny, you talk to high school coach in some remote area about a kid, and the kid may be far and away the best player who has ever played there, and the coach will go completely overboard and tell you 'I think he's gonna be drafted' and you want to say to him 'Um, no, he's a marginal D1 talent.' And then you...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Baseballmom: NCSA worked for us. Worked for many others. I don't make a dime from them and very little of my article speaks about NCSA. You are the one keying on it. It's just another resource. One of many. I have also been on this site plenty of times over the last couple of years. Some real good information, some well intended, but wrong, and some just disturbingly wrong. By the way, I simply posted an article of what worked for me. Didn't find too much camaraderie, I'm sorry. Just a lot...
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Re: Do Scouts value HS baseball enough for a player to toil In a bad program

joes87 ·
IMO, not a valid reason to not play HS ball. What will he do if the college team he commits to ends up being "not good". As others have said the college coaches will be wanting updates from his HS coach from time to time. If he tells a college coach he stopped playing because the team "was not good" it is going to work against him. In addition there is the possibility the college guys find out he was playing HS for a while and stopped. They may decide that want to put a call into the HS...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
It may not have helped you, or you may not like recruiting services, but I found this particular one to be very helpful. I spend very little of the article talking about the service and I say in the article that if you don't do the heavy lifting, the recruiting service will not get your son to play baseball, but it does have value. I would have never found the schools I did with the service's suggestions of what schools my son was a good fit at. It would have taken me forever to find out...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Ptchingfan: Again, my article was for folks who want their kids to continue playing after high school. My point was not that Club Baseball was on a par with NCAA baseball, but rather for those kids who just love the game and their priority is academics, they can still play baseball after high school, and they don't need to worry about missing practices, schedules, etc. Club ball is simply just for those who love the game and dont want to stop playing. Obviously, if you are not required to...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

PitchingFan ·
Also not a fan of recruiting services but if you have the money, spend it. I just feel there are better ways to invest your money. I also believe you send your stats in a small ration because coaches do want to know if you can hit. If you are hitting less than .300 in high school you probably can't hit in college and if you have a 9 era in high school you probably cannot pitch in college. It is not heavily weighed but it is information. I also do not believe club ball is anywhere near the...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Letsgo!!, I just read your other post. Yes, if you come from a family that is not well off and you have D1 talent, you have the possibility of going for peanuts. I know many players might want to choose an LSU over a Harvard, but man, that Harvard degree will be worth its weight in gold.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

letsgo!!! ·
......and you would not sign an nli for the ivies.....no athletic $$, no nli....that said, the ivies will give the most reasonable needs based financial aid.....and cant we all just get along...lol.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
Letsgo: You say, "the ivies will give the most reasonable needs based financial aid." They don't differentiate between students and athletes. Ivys go by a simple formula. If you make good money, even though your boy is a stud, expect to play $80,000. You will pay the same any family will pay with the same financial situation. Many D3s can work with parents and will offer specific academic scholarships or grants to help families pay the tuition. I have found D3s have much more leeway than the...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Iowamom23 ·
Rocky, I honestly don't care that you will say nasty things about me for posting this, but this is simply too egregious and if someone new read your post they could seriously be led astray. Division 3 schools are not allowed to give athletic scholarships — "Division III schools do not offer athletics scholarships."— NCAA web site, link shown below. http://www.ncaa.org/student-at.../future/scholarships People can sign whatever they want to and have whatever ceremony they want to, and they...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Rocky Alvarez ·
By the way, I never said Club baseball was "unofficial D1 baseball." It's perfectly clear that I stated club baseball is not sanctioned by the universities. It's put together by the players who want to keep playing baseball with their friends. I even said the teams are funded by the players. Again, tell me all these things that I know for a fact, that my son and I experienced, that are untrue. Stop doing drive bys brother. Bring something to the table of value. If you disagree about anything...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

RJM ·
Rocky ... There’s so much incorrect in your response you’re not worth the time. However, it did pick up two “likes” quickly on a slow morning. If I want to nitpick the picture in your article is of a D3 signing. D3’s don’t have NLI’s. It’s a staged faux signing to advertise the commitment. I don’t have a problem with high schools and high school athletes doing this. But for an intended informative article it should be a legit NLI signing. Have a nice day. Don’t forget to take your meds.
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

letsgo!!! ·
I was not insinuating that other schools cannot provide merit based aid..i.e. academic scholarships. I was simply pointing out that as it relates to the "formula" that ivies apply to needs based aid, they are much more generous than most other institutions. At least that was my experience. I think it's important for families to understand if they aren't making six figures the ivies may be more affordable than they could imagine. If you value that type of education/experience it may be worth...
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Re: The 411 on helping your son play College Baseball

Swampboy ·
The admins are here, and this thread is closed. Rocky, it’s bad form to post a link to an outside source as your first post and then get aggressively defensive when members take the trouble to read your article and share their honest reactions to it. If you want to continue posting here, play more nicely.
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Re: Do Scouts value HS baseball enough for a player to toil In a bad program

coach2709 ·
HS coach here as well. If your son has talent and comes across as mature and humble when talking to coaches he will be fine. Overall it is frustrating to play for a lesser team but there are so many things to get out of it than just baseball. The college coaches will know he plays for a bad HS team and they will want to see how he handles that obstacle - does he show up everyday ready to compete, how does he treat his inferior team mates, how does he handle the losing and things like that.
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Housing at a different college

2017_Grad ·
Hello, I don't know if anyone on this site knows or has done it, but I'll ask anyway. Is it possible if you attend classes and play baseball at (College A) but they don't have housing, can you live in a dorm and eat in (College B)? And can the baseball coach communicate that or should I go through the admissions office? Thank you in advance.
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Re: Housing at a different college

CaCO3Girl ·
No, that is what off campus housing is used for. Colleges are not interconnected like that.
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Re: What say you...

MidAtlanticDad ·
This part of the description stood out to me: "will likely start all 4 years at their chosen position." I would never make that assumption at any program, especially at D3. If the new coach is going to turn things around, he's going to do it primarily by finding better players. Sounds like school "A" has a track record of developing guys and playing more juniors and seniors. School "B" has no track record, so there is some risk involved. School "B" may still be the better choice, but...
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Re: What say you...

MomLW ·
The above responses are all good. I think I'd encourage my son to carefully consider Option B also because of the opportunity to play more. But, if his intuition causes him to lean toward one or the other (perhaps because of the coach or the school atmosphere or no reason at all), that should weigh heavily. Finally, as a praying person, I'd do a lot of that and encourage my son to do that as well.
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Re: Housing at a different college

Rob T ·
Yea - in re-reading the OP, it seems now we are talking about a school that doesn't have housing at all vs one that has housing, but has temporary need for more. Two different scenarios. Although I guess if a school doesn't have housing at all that the coach may be able to relay what the other out of town players do.
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Re: Housing at a different college

JCG ·
In rare cases they are. There is a housing exchange program among the Claremont Colleges, and students at all 7 schools share the dining commons. Students at the 5 College Consortium in Mass may also dine at other member colleges.
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Re: Do Scouts value HS baseball enough for a player to toil In a bad program

TPM ·
GOOSEGG, Was replying when you were. You are 100% correct, coaches don't recruit teams, they recruit players. I am a big believer that you don't have to be on a high profile team or break the bank doing showcases to get a scholarship. Usually it just becomes an excuse when the parent sees others getting offers early. I would concentrate on what's important, which might mean contacting programs that fit the players skills. Way to many want to play on programs that they will get lost at.
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Re: Housing at a different college

Rob T ·
I wouldn't think so either, but I don't know that it would be a set in concrete thing. For instance if a neighboring college had available dorm space, I don't think there is a reason why it couldn't be rented to a school in need of space. Granted, I've never seen it - but my wife keeps telling me that's not valid evidence.
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Re: What say you...

Matt Reiland ·
Agreed - a lot changes from year to year. Especially at the higher-tier schools that bring in large classes of JC transfers. You may have "put in your time" for 2 years on the bench, but there is still the chance that your coach brings in a JC transfer to start over you.
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Re: Do Scouts value HS baseball enough for a player to toil In a bad program

Smitty28 ·
To me, the bolded statement is the real issue. He's got to figure out how not to take a step back in the spring due to the weak HS program. The best way, IMO, is for him to own the process of getting better and not place blame on the HS program. Be the hardest worker during HS practice and take the opportunity to be a leader. Continue to work out with his hitting coach and fielding coach in the evenings (if need be, put your foot down with the HS coach on this point, rather than quit). Hit...
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Re: Do Scouts value HS baseball enough for a player to toil In a bad program

2020dad ·
Can we just be honest? Nobody cares one way or another. Even if they would 'prefer' that you play HS ball if a coach thinks you are better than the other kid they will take you. If not they will take the other kid. Its that simple. Now I get that if they think the kid may flunk out or he has a criminal record etc that comes into play. But this thought that they place such a high value on character... Ok maybe for their lower end guys. But if a kid with poor character is throwing 95 he will...
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Re: Housing at a different college

CaCO3Girl ·
Rob T, in your scenario the A school has rented from the B school, i.e. it's their dorm now. In the OP that's not the scenario.
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Re: What say you...

cabbagedad ·
My thoughts are to drill deeper. I'll start with program B - Many losing programs bring in a new coach who, of course, claims he will turn the program around. What are the real chances that this is the guy? It usually doesn't turn out that way. Playing is great. Playing for a perennial loser and getting hammered regularly can take the joy out in a hurry. Do you see indicators with this guy, beyond his required dialog, that lead to believe maybe he can turn it around? What is his relevant...
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What say you...

MDBallDad ·
Most college baseball programs fall somewhere on the spectrum between perennial winners or regular bottom dwellers. We are faced with those two extremes, so let's set some basic background first. You have a player who is not going to be drafted into the professional ranks so lets assume a baseball career is not going to happen. The player is an excellent student and will likely have a successful financial future associated with what ever academic program they select. So now for the baseball...
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Re: Do Scouts value HS baseball enough for a player to toil In a bad program

Golfman25 ·
A lot of high school programs are "easier" than travel programs. HS teachers/coaches can't be hard a###s anymore. And unless they play even worse competition, they will have their opportunities. My kid has faced several D1 pitchers at the high school level. It keeps you sharp.
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Re: Do Scouts value HS baseball enough for a player to toil In a bad program

rynoattack ·
I agree somewhat, but let's be honest, there are a lot more guys not throwing 95, than those that do. Therefore, it does matter for most. Is it absolutely essential? No. In most cases is it the right thing to do? I think Yes.
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Re: Do Scouts value HS baseball enough for a player to toil In a bad program

RJM ·
If you’re better. But after the top studs the difference between one player and the next couple hundred is minimal. Now the variables come into play. Playing or not playing high school ball is a variable.
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Re: What say you...

Branson Baseball ·
A lot of great responses! We went through this same discussion with my 2016 last year. I agree with what MidAtlantic says. Every coach at every school is looking to bring in better talent every year. There are zero playing time guarantees anywhere IMHO. My boys wanted commitment from the coaching staffs for Spring roster spots in year one. And (ideally) a four year roster spot commitment to the player if he was working hard on and off the field and there are no disciplinary issues. Playing...
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Re: Playing High School vs. Playing Travelball

Dominik85 ·
Maybe he doesn't want dads in the dugout because he thinks that causes other dads to think he is favoring your Kids because you hang out in the dugout. this is not about your qualification as a Coach. you might very well be qualified for it but HS is just different than TB. TB is an activity were parents pay to Play their kid. even if your TB Coach is better than the JV Coach which very well might be true a TB Coach still doesn't face the same pressure by other parents and School politics.
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