Tagged With "Pitcher"

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Re: 16u pitcher launched a channel to help younger kids learn how to pitch. Needs your support and input.

Sirloindameaty ·
@JCG Thanks for the reply. I think that if kids took the time and effort to engage in positive projects like this, it should be encouraged. There are enough people already on the other side of the equation giving criticism. How many pro's are teaching online and opening themselves up for criticism?
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Re: 16u pitcher launched a channel to help younger kids learn how to pitch. Needs your support and input.

Scott Munroe ·
It is really cool to see a young man trying to give back to the community and the game! Creating a YouTube channel for pitching will bring value to many who may not have the resources to secure professional instruction. Feedback for improvement: 1) Watch a few YouTube videos on Camera presence. He does a great job of showing enthusiasm, but some thought should go into the viewer's experience as well. Meaning, all the unnecessary movement takes away from the viewer's ability to focus on the...
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Re: 16u pitcher launched a channel to help younger kids learn how to pitch. Needs your support and input.

Sirloindameaty ·
@Scott Muroe Thanks for the feedback and the suggestions. I feel like your post is a good example of how forums like this should be used. Meaningful and constructive feedback is not always easy to come by on forums. Thank you! I'll pass the sentiment along. I think that collaboration with other programs may be a little ways down the road given time and age constraints.
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Re: 16u pitcher launched a channel to help younger kids learn how to pitch. Needs your support and input.

Scott Munroe ·
You are welcome! Also, I agree the forum should be a place for feedback....how else can you learn if you do not ask for feedback? In defense of those who choose not to provide feedback, this forum has a couple of members on it that have ruined it for people like you and I apologize for that. There many good people on this site who have a wealth of knowledge that would love to help continue an up and coming player's success. You know who they are...just PM them with your questions. Just for...
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Re: 16u pitcher launched a channel to help younger kids learn how to pitch. Needs your support and input.

Go44dad ·
Why can't a 16 year old be an effective coach? Who knows? I am certain my son could teach younger kids to pitch better than a lot of coaches out there. I do just want to put one thing out there. I live in Texas. If my HS son gives lessons, helps someone out with baseball or similar and gets paid for it, it is a UIL violation and if you play on a high school team all of the games can (and most likely will) be forfeited. It happened here a couple years ago. ...
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Re: 16u pitcher launched a channel to help younger kids learn how to pitch. Needs your support and input.

Sirloindameaty ·
@go44dad Thanks for the reply and heads up. At this time, the you-tube channel and all the content is free and he is not getting paid for anything. But that is a good point about the various rules around players getting paid. Thanks you!
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Re: 16u pitcher launched a channel to help younger kids learn how to pitch. Needs your support and input.

cabbagedad ·
I just took a quick glance at this from work with no audio. My observation may be useful from this different perspective. The video is 4:18 long. There are three short 5 second action clips (two of them being identical). The remaining 4+ minutes are video of a guy talking. I don't even know what the topic was but kids young and old require a much higher ratio of visual demonstration and less talk. Even if he was just talking about what he was going to be presenting in the future, still need...
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Re: 16u pitcher launched a channel to help younger kids learn how to pitch. Needs your support and input.

Sirloindameaty ·
@cabbagedad Thanks for the reply and the thoughtful feedback. I'll make that suggestion to the channel producer.
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Re: Throwing 2 days in a row

MKbaseballdad ·
Son attended HF and the short answer to that question is yes, pitchers throw both days. I'm not sure if I'd say "make you" throw 2 days. I think you'd have the option to just throw day 1 or 2 but you'd most likely only get your 2 innings for that day. That's probably a good question for you to ask the HF team via email. They are very responsive. I can tell you that they have a pitching coordinator who checks on the pitchers each day as they enter the facility (on Long Island) and adjusts...
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Re: Throwing 2 days in a row

9and7dad ·
So you're saying that two short outings on consecutive days bothers your arm? If so, you may have an issue that requires attention.
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Re: Throwing 2 days in a row

cabbagedad ·
Welcome to the site, Kayne87... Yes, this is the bigger concern... Figure out what the issues are and get them fixed sooner than later or there will be no purpose in pursuing playing at the next level. That symptom points to something either structural or mechanical and there is a possibility that you are worsening the issue by continuing to throw. Get to a good sports PT or sports ortho. Best of luck to you.
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Re: Throwing 2 days in a row

PGStaff ·
Once again, this can be a pitch count situation. Depending on how many pitches are thrown on the first day. It's not innings, it is the number of pitches that count. I'm almost certain that no one at either camp is going to throw someone who tells them he can't throw. This is why parents and players need to monitor things and understand arm care. Nobody running those events mentioned wants to purposely put any pitcher at risk. All you have to do is tell them ahead of time that you only want...
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Re: Throwing 2 days in a row

Backstop22 ·
My son attended HF in Sacramento and if you signed up as a Pitcher as your primary position, you are expected, but not required, to pitch 2 innings both days. Now when I say "innings" remember: All batters start with a 1-1 count and are told to swing away--the HF umps call anything close a strike Only 5 batters hit each inning By way of example, my son pitched 11 pitches one inning and 14 the next and that was with several K's. I'd say most kids tossed between 15-25 pitches in their two...
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Re: Throwing 2 days in a row

playball2011 ·
Are you saying you are in pain day after throwing many innings or is arm just tired? Is it painful when you re throwing? How many do you pitch in a game, 100, 110, 120 plus? If you have any pain it needs to be checked out. Much better to have issue in HS and fix it then in college if you get to play at that level. Good Luck to you.
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Re: Throwing 2 days in a row

Rob T ·
As mentioned above... Throwing a couple of innings two days in a row may not be ideal depending on the number of pitches - but it should be something that you can do if necessary. If you do move on to play in college, you are going to be expected to throw a lot. Probably 6-7 days a week at some points. If pitching one day makes it impossible to throw the next, you really need to get your arm checked out. You are probably aggravating a chronic condition, and that isn't good for your long term...
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Re: pitcher in a nerd's body

threeunassisted ·
My son is 16 and has some introvert tendencies. he made Varsity this year as a sophomore, and is struggling with the social aspect of it. None of the upperclassmen have gone out of their way to include him outside of practice/games (like a big group of them go out to eat a lot after practice) and he isnt one to include himself. I know it weighs heavily on him, but its just his personality. His biggest fear in life is being in a crowd of people where he doesnt know anyone. He literally used...
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Re: pitcher in a nerd's body

cluelessDad2019 ·
Y'all need to have one of our type kids to see the hilarity of the restaurant ordering description. We had to do the same, and even when he would get it out it was always so quietly that he ended up needing to repeat it 2 or 3 times. lmao When you see the team huddled together around coach, you can always count on mine being on the outskirts... part of it all, but NOT in the middle. I didn't mention it in the OP, but another reason for not changing teams often was the paralyzing fear of...
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Re: pitcher in a nerd's body

MomLW ·
Take a look at this. Absolutely nothing wrong with being introverted - help them to be comfortable with it. Also, I think everyone feels socially awkward at some time or another. Just make sure they don't feel alone in it. http://www.ted.com/talks/susan..._power_of_introverts
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Re: pitcher in a nerd's body

fenwaysouth ·
Kids come in all kinds of packages. When my oldest son discovered (at a young age) he could throw a baseball very fast, and the game involved a lot of math and stats.... he was hooked. He was intrigued by it at at a very young age. Don't get me wrong he worked very hard to improve his skills at every level, but it was the initial appeal that won his love for the game. If you are a good pitcher with "stuff", and you understand baseball situations and probabilities....you can go a long way in...
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Re: pitcher in a nerd's body

birdman14 ·
Wow fenway, I think Goose Gossage might have something to say about that one! My son (HS 2010, college 2014) also liked the thinking part of the game as a pitcher and later learned to apply it as a hitter too. Outsmarting the hitter was what made pitching his favorite part of the game. Having what you describe as a "nerd" son can be an advantage as a baseball player. Working opposite of what the hitter may be looking for can be very successful.
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Re: pitcher in a nerd's body

RoyalRooter ·
My son is also an introvert. He comes from a long line of them... While my son has been described as "quietly confident" and has always been relatively comfortable in his own skin, I did have him read the sister book to the above Ted talk, Quiet by Susan Cain , in 8th grade. He would not be headed to his base high school, with the kids he had been with for the past nine years, but instead be off to a bigger pond where he would know very few. I wanted him to have a deeper understanding of his...
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Re: pitcher in a nerd's body

TPM ·
Khailil Greene from Clemson, considered an introvert, was never really the perfect teammate. They chalked it up to just being Khalil. He was the ACC player of the year, and drafted first round. Turned out that he had severe social anxiety, has left the game and in hiding somewhere. The Padres never recognized his behavior as troublesome, but after going to the Cardinals, he was seen hurting himself in the dugout and teammates spoke up. He received help but has left the game since. Such a...
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Re: pitcher in a nerd's body

jp24 ·
Does he have a killer instinct on the mound? Just curious, because I know a young man who sounds like your son. He has fairly good stuff but lacks that competitive fire, and it bites him.
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Re: pitcher in a nerd's body

RJM ·
One of my best friends had good velocity and great stuff. What he lacked was confidence. When the count was 2-1 he would think, "Another ball and it's 3-1. Then I'm close to walking him." This led to too many grooved pitches that left the park. He was still lightly recruited into a good program. Post freshman year we were both in the same summer league on different teams. When he took the mound it was painful to hear a teammate yell to us, "That's pure meat on the mound. It's fatten the...
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Re: pitcher in a nerd's body

cluelessDad2019 ·
----- As others mentioned above, I also continue to be amazed at how he would dread having to stand on a stage in a theater but is completely unfazed and unflappable on the "stage" of the pitcher's mound...(or batter's box, or anywhere else between the white lines). ------ me too! This is so true of my son. I appreciate all your thoughts and the sharing of experiences. - MOMLW... I had seen that TED talk before, but had forgotten about it... I'll get him to watch it. Thnx - JP24... an astute...
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Re: pitcher in a nerd's body

soulslam55 ·
I think your last sentence says it all. I also have a 2019 and the one thing I've prepared him for is dad is not there in the dugout anymore to help him, he needs to recognize where to make his adjustments and then make them. I'm always around to talk about things after the games. But he has to do the heavy lifting now. Enjoy it. My 2016 has become a man in HS, which makes me proud and kind of sad at the same time. A good kind of sad I guess.
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Re: Pitcher Development in High School - Importance of Facing Good Hitting

RJM ·
Make the best academic choice for school. Make the best baseball choice for summer.
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Re: Pitcher Development in High School - Importance of Facing Good Hitting

chefmike7777 ·
I agree with RJM. For my son's development it was about off speed pitches. His junior and especially his senior year, he could just throw his fastball by most hitters. For the better hitters, he utilized his CB and slider as well (pitching coach called pitches). He probably threw 90% fastballs. What he never developed in HS was a change up. He worked on it some but never was called in HS because coach felt that a hitter who could not catch up with his fastball, the change up might be within...
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Re: Pitcher Development in High School - Importance of Facing Good Hitting

Lost Dad ·
Thanks - my son's change up is probably his best pitch actually. His coaches love it. His curve is pretty strong but he continues to work at it.
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Re: Pitcher Development in High School - Importance of Facing Good Hitting

CaCO3Girl ·
Around GA the general consensus is Summer Baseball is where you will find the FAR better competition. As a side note, older members on the board....if this player does switch schools how does he have a health talk with a coach before he plays for the guy? We have all heard the horror stories of a talented pitcher being overused on a team, especially on a weaker team than he typically plays on.
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Re: Pitcher Development in High School - Importance of Facing Good Hitting

baseballmom ·
Just to throw another log on the fire...consider how you are prepping him for the "social" aspects of college...It is vastly different than the cocoon of home schooling or even private schools. Academics is priority 1. I tend to agree, initially, with the select team coach...and...I also understand the value of a school team. Challenging decision.
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Re: Pitcher Development in High School - Importance of Facing Good Hitting

ironhorse ·
In 10 years he may or may not be using his pitching skills. In 10 years he will definitely be using his academic and social skills. There's a cart and there's a horse. You decide the order.
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Re: Pitcher Development in High School - Importance of Facing Good Hitting

Lost Dad ·
FYI he is going to get a top quality academic environment regardless. He has been in a strong co-op and has excellent PSAT scores. His co-op is disbanding is the main issue of why we are looking at a university model private school.
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Re: Pitcher Development in High School - Importance of Facing Good Hitting

cabbagedad ·
If he plays summer and fall travel, that should satisfy the "face good hitters" aspect. The HS team experience will be a good opportunity for him to be a good teammate and leader under sometimes-less-than-ideal circumstances. If he finds himself in spots where he and/or his team is dominating, he can work on locating various pitches with a guy in the box, being less concerned with the outcome. This said, if the level of play is ridiculously poor, then other baseball options may be worth...
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Re: Pitcher Development in High School - Importance of Facing Good Hitting

Goosegg ·
FWIW, we faced the decision of where to go to HS: large public with good baseball, exposure, many social opportunities but limited ability to sculpt a good academic path or a small private with awful baseball and insular social life, but small advanced classes and an administration which would develop academic curriculum on essentially an individual basis. S is a LHP and he chose (much to our relief) the private school option. I believe the lesser baseball competition did effect his...
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Re: Pitcher Development in High School - Importance of Facing Good Hitting

IEBSBL ·
I have had 4 D1 pitchers come through my program in the last Decade. Education should be the driving factor.
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Re: Pitcher Development in High School - Importance of Facing Good Hitting

Scotty83 ·
Jmho for position players competition is very important. For pitcher? Well hitting a spot with as much velocity as you can muster is the same no matter who's in the box. The only thing that helps is learning what to pitch to better hitters but hey don't coaches call all the pitches now a days anyway.
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Re: Pitcher Development in High School - Importance of Facing Good Hitting

2017LHPscrewball ·
Following up on the last post by SCOTT83 - Does anyone have some insight into the pros and cons of coaches calling pitches? I am interested in the various levels starting in high school or age equivalent (assuming that is when you truly start having multiple options). I have always heard that in MLB there is often a split between pitchers and catchers as to who "calls" the shots - not an ego thing but rather which player generally does a better job scouting the hitters while understanding...
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Re: Pitcher Development in High School - Importance of Facing Good Hitting

Shoveit4Ks ·
Iron sharpens Iron - That being said, i suspect "most" kids who are seeking D1 scholarships or access to playing on D1 college teams are in it for the baseball first. One, as the dream and continuing to chase it to the Milb or MLB and secondarily the challenge/competitiveness to succeed and impact your character, i would suspect less are taking critically difficult majors with post-graduate-baseball income as the primary focus. If yours is...kudos to you. I would be curious to understand the...
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Re: Pitcher wanting to catch

FoxDad ·
Generally, by HS it's rare for a player to catch and pitch and do both effectively. Catcher's usually have a short throw for the pick off throw to 2nd (Ie, they don't bring their arm all the way back - usually throw from the ear). Catching is tough on the knees/legs due to squatting much of the time. Even if he doesn't pitch the same day as catching, the effect can still be felt. If your son wants to catch, that's fine. He just needs to realize he may have to give up pitching. It's one of...
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Re: Pitcher wanting to catch

FFXfireman ·
My boy was a RHP/C right up until high school when his travel coach (a well accomplished RHP) told him he needed to choose. His biggest issue was, not only the different mechanics, but the wear on the arm. No position on the field throws the ball more than the pitcher and catcher by far. That repetition is a recipie for overuse and injury. Since entering HS (he's a 2018), he has been a RHP/OF and that's done quite well for him. Good luck!
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Re: Pitcher wanting to catch

playball2011 ·
Catching to be a better P makes no sense. My son caught and P until age 13 when we saw that catching was a contact position at times so we had him stop because his P abilities were better and didn't want to worry about injuries, which he had a few minor ones. son also moved from SS/3B to outfield when not P which he loved. He got in the long toss he needed. With 5 catchers in program how much playing time would son get? The fact that he can play Inf positions will get him more time.
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Re: Pitcher wanting to catch

lionbaseball ·
Be careful for what you wish. We are in a small school (400 HS kids) so the talent depth is shallow. My son catches and pitches and to be honest I don't see his catching form interfering with this pitching form. My biggest concern is that in tournaments or playoffs he will pitch one game and catch the next. Not only arm fatigue but the squatting takes a toll on your legs which are instrumental in pitching. During the season it's not a big deal because we play 2 games per week. So the 1st...
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Re: Pitcher wanting to catch

CaCO3Girl ·
My son is also a 2020 8th grader, who pitches and catches. He says that being a catcher has allowed him to be a better hitter. When you call for a specific pitch and you see it over and over again, how it moves, what the pitchers arm looked like, the spin...etc...well he swears it allows him better pitch recognition and he does have the lowest strike out percentage on the team...so he may have a point. I will say that getting into catching in 8th grade is going to be difficult. Catchers have...
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Re: Pitcher wanting to catch

2019Dad ·
I'm going to have to disagree with CaCO3Girl on this one. There are so many examples of catchers who took it up in college or after turning pro (Buster Posey, Carlos Ruiz, Mike Piazza, etc.), that I don't think 8th grade is in any way "late." Just by way of example, one of the two catchers getting playing time at UCLA this year is a true freshman who was a high school infielder that UCLA converted to catcher this year -- and he's gotten 16 starts at catcher. So if he wants to become a...
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Re: Pitcher wanting to catch

B-MoreBeast ·
I catch and pitch and only started catching regularly in the Spring/Summer of 2015. If he's committed to getting better and actually wants to play the position I'd say it's worth it to give him a shot. I saw some of the above comments regarding how catching skills take years and years behind the dish to develop, but if your son has a high baseball IQ and a natural feel for the game he'll catch on quickly. I've found that it is very much a reactionary position as much as it is an anticipatory...
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Re: Pitcher wanting to catch

Backstop22 ·
We went through almost the same thing with my 2017 when he was an incoming Freshman. He was an OF/P with a strong arm and then the Varsity coach saw his Freshman team with two poor catching options and suggested to my son he would have a better chance of playing more as a C (he had caught some in Pony but it had been two years). So what I did was make a deal with him that we would buy some basic used catcher's gear for his Freshman season, and if he still wanted to catch and the coach wanted...
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Re: Pitcher wanting to catch

RJM ·
As someone noted there are name catchers who didn't catch until college. Bob Boone was an All American third baseman at Stanford. The Phillies made him a catcher in the minors. Blake Swihart was drafted for his athleticism and moved to catcher in the minors. I've seen a few middle infielders and centerfielders moved to catcher in high school. They have the hands and the arm. Pitching and catching? Not a good idea for the arm or the legs.
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Re: Pitcher wanting to catch

playball2011 ·
You will not see a P/C in college. Possey was a SS I believe in HS. This kids HS team already has 5 catchers, unless he's amazing he won't be a catcher there. To the dad whose son is in HS and a starting P on Fri then catching the Sat game. WHY r u allowing that? The coach is only thinking of winning a game, not what's best for your sons arm. If this kid is a good P I would not let him start catching too. You'll have to deal w coaches like this one that will abuse arm.
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Re: Pitcher wanting to catch

CaCO3Girl ·
RJM, the OP said there were 5 catchers and his kid was on the small side. You and the other posters are talking about turning a highly athletic player into a catcher....I think that's a bit different than picking up the gear in 8th grade and beating out 5 guys for the job while trying to pitch.
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