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I have been on this site for years, preparing for the day this Summer when genuine interest and decisions are made involving college baseball.  I have watched son succeed and fail in front of potentially interested coaches, and I have scheduled camps and showcases that I have been told may help get him on radar of interested schools.  I have talked to parents of kids we play with -- and have played with -- that are signing at major baseball D1 schools and being considered top picks in the draft.  I have also talked to other parents on team whose sons have got virtually no interest from any schools to date.  I have sent emails to colleges, and had my son respond to colleges that showed real interest.  I have filled out questionaires for colleges for my son after he came back exhausted from double headers, and I have pushed him to return calls and fill out stuff when he only had limited interest in a school.

 

We are less than half way through the Summer and every week brings a different emotion.  I think we both are starting to realize what level of college he most likely will be considered by, and it is not the top echelon baseball schools.  Yes some say they are still watching, but we see the size, speed and velocity of the kids that are being considered by these schools, and although he has played well head-to-head with these guys, or against those type of players, we understand that being "projectable" is one of the most important considerations, (and that objective numbers do matter).  . 

 

I am writing this because I feel I may be obsessing too much, but I know I am not the only one.  I just understand how important a decision college is for my son, not as much baseball wise, but career wise.  It was easy for my daughter as she did not want to play college sports, but my son still wants to go to good academic school and keep the pro ball dream alive. 

 

I would love to hear from others in my position.  Misery loves company so blurt it out.  We can share our pain over the next few months together.

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Go back and read some of my post and you will see what I have been through in the last year.  Most of the regulars know that I have a 2013, 2014, 2016 and a 2018 .  I have done all that you have mentioned and more.

 

I have spent enough money to send a kid to school, I have obsessed and got angry, then sad , then mad, then glad again. Honestly, 4 years ago when I came to this site I knew very little about what really happens, matters and doesn't matter about college recruiting.

 

  I have a 2013 that signed at a very good JUCO.... during his recruiting we knew early on that he was a bit of a late bloomer and decided to take the JUCO route.  He had other offers from an NAIA that has won two titles, a D2 and a D3.  We figured after two years of JUCO , those other 4 years schools were still an option.

 

I have a 2014 that will likely be a D1 player. He has visited a few schools, had quality contact from 15-18 D1's and is ranked pretty high nationally.  I can tell you this, the recruiting at this level is different than the lower levels, but I cannot say it's always better.  I will say there's more to think about. In the last week he has gotten 6 calls from D2 schools, I beleive since they can call first.... He has talked to many D1 coaches, and they know what to say and how to say it.  It can sound very good.

 

I have a 2016 that just got back from PG in Atlanta, but has such a high ACT he will end up at an academic school and baseball could be over for him, or maybe he still plays, but school definately comes first for him

 

I have a 2018 that is better now then the other three were at the same 8th grade age. He has a gifted arm throwing 80 at 13......

 

The factors that we HAVE to stick to are

 

1.) do you like the school , if the coach leaves, if you get hurt, you have to stay in school.

2.) can you afford the school with out baseball money?

3.) go where you are going to get more opportunities to play.

We had a mid level D1 HC ask 2014 if he wanted to be on his mound pitching against Vandy, or in Vandy's bullpen watching the game and waiting to get a chance.

 

We have learned that while some schools and coaches will love your style, others will hate it... So in the end go where you can play, and be happy at that school and forget about the level.  I would rather be at a top NAIA program that has a winning tradition than a D1 that loses all the time. 

 

Also, don't take it personally, I have learned that most of the time, there are other factors that go into who they pick.  Money, scholerships, team needs, parents, lots of things you cannot control.

 

 

Originally Posted by lefthookdad:

LOL...add me to the list.....still waiting for a solid contact.....maybe after East Cobb, since he will be playing in both 18 & 17U......just need that one outing in front of the right person

Mine are at East Cobb as well,  you will see morecoaches at the 17 tourney... 2014 just got back from Area Code tryout, kinda waiting to see how that shakes out...

 

In your opinion what is solid contact?  An offer? 

As suggested above, you have to focus on those things under your control and ignore the rest (or at least learn from the rest).  I attended a major tournament over the weekend watching about a dozen players I tutor, then covered a popular showcase event today (over 60 colleges represented) and will be on hand for another showcase opportunity this weekend (100+ college coaches expected).  Speaking to as many baseball insiders as I could, there are common themes a family can embrace---first and foremost, players and parents need to develop a realistic understanding of the student-athlete profile and, from a recruiting perspective, a player's talent will drive that profile.  As I indicated in another post, a one-on-one player evaluation from a qualified baseball source (perhaps several sources) can be critical.  That evaluation may be difficult to initially accept, some feedback can be hard to handle but it is absolutely necessary in order for a family to shape its decision-making in the months to come.  Talent, although the major element of the profile, is not the only factor of course; a family has to consider the eventual college choice from a variety of angles (academically, financially, socially, culturally, logistically, geographically, etc.).  This exercise isn't easy, and a player's profile emerges over time as talent develops (or doesn't), test scores are obtained, a family becomes better informed regarding the process itself, etc.  You need to be patient but very cognizant too.  Finally---as I was reminded of by college coaches over and over again this week---a player has to be proactive, a coach can't recruit you if he doesn't know who you are.  Yes, a special talent can attend a showcase or two and enjoy a meteoric rise to the top of the recruiting charts, it happens year after year, but, for most players, this journey will be a marathon, not a sprint, so buckle up for the ride (lots of bumps, twists, and turns).   

 

The baseball industry does a great job overall in providing development, competitive, and exposure opportunities but does a less-than-stellar job of educating families regarding the recruiting road ahead.  Poor choices, misinformation, and unrealistic expectations derail many college baseball dreams.  My mantra is simple---think education first, playing opportunity second.  Translation---get the best education you can consistent with your academic credentials and career interests, and attend a school where you can actually compete, go where you are truly wanted!

 

For current (2014) grads, this summer can bring opportunity, challenge, reward, and enormous disappointment.  A player I worked with several years back had an impressive performance at a tournament in late June, and a Division I school came calling; the player was a fringe Division I player and the planets had to all align---again and again.  The player and his parents were obviously ecstatic over the Division I interest but I cautioned them (based on the student-athlete profile) that the rest of summer would be similar to American Idol---the player had to perform in a major way weekend after weekend to solidify Division I interest.  That didn't happen, it was virtually impossible to expect that, and frustration, anger, etc. followed.  Then at the end of the summer, the player and family, to their credit, escaped their mental funk, turned their attention to schools that were a realistic match, and, almost immediately, a half dozen schools were at the player's doorstep, and the player committed to a Division III program about a month later.

 

If you have talent, there is a college out there for you, I honestly believe that---it may not be the ACC, SEC, etc., but baseball can be part of your college experience if you target your time, resources, and mindset towards options which offer legitimate opportunity.  Turn down the expectations and regroup.  But don't wait too long before shifting gears since many small colleges aren't sitting back as much as they once did waiting for the big schools to quench their thirst...times are changing, so get in front of that change and manage it to your advantage, or get out of the way. 

Alebaba,

Welcome to the most stressful 6-9 months you will go through. Just like everyone here who has/had a son playing in college you are experiencing what we all did.  

 

It was our experience that programs are after pitchers first and then specific needs of a program, so it is still early for position players. We found, for us at least, my son was getting contact during the summer to see where he was playing, and then it really heated up in the fall. The fall scout leagues in California is when the recruiting gets hot and heavy…..but it goes all of the way through HS season of their Sr year. My son had major D1 programs coming out to see him play during his Sr year, so frankly it is really early to get too worried.

 

I would be sure to make sure you broaden your horizons and check out some DIII programs if your son has good grades and can get some academic money. There are some excellent DIII schools in your vicinity from Texas into the South. Also be working on JUCO’s to see what opportunities may be available there.

 

Frankly my son did not commit until the last official date of May 1st of his Sr year so you have plenty of time….to be worried.

 

The best advice I can give is to have a plan and keep working the plan. It will all work out.

 

Best of luck.

Originally Posted by bacdorslider:
Originally Posted by lefthookdad:

LOL...add me to the list.....still waiting for a solid contact.....maybe after East Cobb, since he will be playing in both 18 & 17U......just need that one outing in front of the right person

Mine are at East Cobb as well,  you will see morecoaches at the 17 tourney... 2014 just got back from Area Code tryout, kinda waiting to see how that shakes out...

 

In your opinion what is solid contact?  An offer? 

For me it will be a very good open dialog with a coach....for my kid it is an offer.  Son being a LHP has eased the anxiety a little...but not completely

Originally Posted by lefthookdad:
Originally Posted by bacdorslider:
Originally Posted by lefthookdad:

LOL...add me to the list.....still waiting for a solid contact.....maybe after East Cobb, since he will be playing in both 18 & 17U......just need that one outing in front of the right person

Mine are at East Cobb as well,  you will see morecoaches at the 17 tourney... 2014 just got back from Area Code tryout, kinda waiting to see how that shakes out...

 

In your opinion what is solid contact?  An offer? 

For me it will be a very good open dialog with a coach....for my kid it is an offer.  Son being a LHP has eased the anxiety a little...but not completely


sent you a PM

I will tell you one thing that I'll wager you won't like, but if you will take it to heart, I assure you it will help.

 

You are doing too much for your son.  Many of the tasks you describe yourself doing are his job.  The fact that you are doing any of the work for him identifies some key problems.

 

First, the fact that your son is tired and doesn't want to work on the paperwork so you do it for him:  If your son cannot handle this level of workload, he is not cut out to be a D1 player.  What your comments say to me is that he likes playing baseball but he does not have a full appreciation for what is involved in the event he actually reached his goal.  Players typically come home exhausted day after day, and then they open their books and they do what school requires of them.  Day after day for every day for four years. We are not talking about recreational baseball here.  We're talking about baseball as a job with school always imposing still more workload.

 

Conversely, if he thinks he is a D1 player, then the time has come for him to start proving that he has what it takes to manage his life and all the responsibilities that come with his choices all on his lonesome.

 

Second, to the extent that anyone sees you doing all this for your son, you are not helping him, you are hurting him.  Partly because college coaches see all they need to see of helicopter parents while recruiting, they would just as soon not have them around for the four years the son is playing.  But also partly because when it becomes clear to them that a kid does not fully appreciate what it is he's asking to be taken into, what will be expected of him, and a determination to meet his obligations all on his lonesome, that is a kid who has a higher than average likelihood of washing out in college.  And given the choice between two otherwise comparable players, your son will lose out.

 

I noticed that whenever you mentioned that you were doing things for your son, you prefaced your comments with an excuse for doing so.  What that tells me is, you've already heard this message before and you have decided that it really doesn't apply to you because things are really tough in your particular situation.  What I'll tell you is, you are wrong about that.

 

If you really want to help your son, show him this note and tell him that from now on, it's tough love, and he's on his own.

Aleebaba,

 

Sorry you are feeling down in the dumps right now, but there is joy at the end I assure you.  I agree with Midlo that your son could and should be doing more, if you are doing most or all of the work.  He needs more skin in the game for a few reasons.   He could be learning life skills such as learning how to find a job, which let's face it playing D1 baseball is a job.  My suggestion would be to show him everything you've been doing for him, demonstrate how to do it, and turn the keys of the kingdom over to him.   You will serve as a consultant.

 

If you don't have an offer by June 27 (get in line) that doesn't make your current & past efforts a failure.  You've learned where not to spend any more of your time and money, and that is valuable information.   There is still a lot of time and a lot of opportunities out there for your son.  From what you've shared with me privately, I know your son will have many upcoming options.   I'd revisit your targets, and exposure strategy to get in front of those targets then turn over the contact efforts to your son.  We tweaked our strategy a number of times until we finally figured it out.  I have every confidence that you will do the same.

 

Good luck!

 

 

Originally Posted by Aleebaba:

I have been on this site for years, preparing for the day this Summer when genuine interest and decisions are made involving college baseball.  I have watched son succeed and fail in front of potentially interested coaches, and I have scheduled camps and showcases that I have been told may help get him on radar of interested schools.  I have talked to parents of kids we play with -- and have played with -- that are signing at major baseball D1 schools and being considered top picks in the draft.  I have also talked to other parents on team whose sons have got virtually no interest from any schools to date.  I have sent emails to colleges, and had my son respond to colleges that showed real interest.  I have filled out questionaires for colleges for my son after he came back exhausted from double headers, and I have pushed him to return calls and fill out stuff when he only had limited interest in a school.

 

We are less than half way through the Summer and every week brings a different emotion.  I think we both are starting to realize what level of college he most likely will be considered by, and it is not the top echelon baseball schools.  Yes some say they are still watching, but we see the size, speed and velocity of the kids that are being considered by these schools, and although he has played well head-to-head with these guys, or against those type of players, we understand that being "projectable" is one of the most important considerations, (and that objective numbers do matter).  . 

 

I am writing this because I feel I may be obsessing too much, but I know I am not the only one.  I just understand how important a decision college is for my son, not as much baseball wise, but career wise.  It was easy for my daughter as she did not want to play college sports, but my son still wants to go to good academic school and keep the pro ball dream alive. 

 

I would love to hear from others in my position.  Misery loves company so blurt it out.  We can share our pain over the next few months together.

This is all about you, which is fine, but I think some of us might have additional observations if it were more about the prospect.

 

Is he obsessing too much? Does he understand how important a decision college is for him? Is he in pain that he is looking to share?

 

Someone once gave me sage advice about youth sports. If the player doesn't have a problem, there is no problem.

Midlo,

 

I would agree with you if he was not working his butt off to get straight As in school and becoming a better ballplayer.   Filling out a few forms does not count as a "helicopter" parent, and I received advice from others that the recruiting process can be overwhelming, and not to have him focused on it every day.  I help with that part and inform him, and he makes decision on how to proceed based on my advice.  He makes 99% of all contacts with interested coaches.  Note:  I helped my daughter too in her college search, and somehow she survived.

I agree that you should not be doing everything, or most things, for them.  But our family is a team and this is a team effort to help him find the right college fit.  I receive(d) advice on this website and told him about it, and we agree on the best recruiting course of action, such as what camps to attend.  I take videos and download on to youtube for him to send links to coaches.  If that is too much, then so be it.  I will take that chance.

 

 

Originally Posted by Green Light:
This is all about you, which is fine, but I think some of us might have additional observations if it were more about the prospect.

 

Is he obsessing too much? Does he understand how important a decision college is for him? Is he in pain that he is looking to share?

 

Someone once gave me sage advice about youth sports. If the player doesn't have a problem, there is no problem.

That is right, I am writing this from a parent's perspective.  He has a more laid back approach about it, which is perfect.  He just needs to focus on being a better ballplayer and student.  When the time comes to make a decision he can go through the heartache of making the right decision, but no reason for him to obsess over it.  17 year olds see life different than 50 year olds, which is great.  If you as a parent do not have anxiety that is fine, but I do not know any parents that fit in that category.

Originally Posted by Aleebaba:
Originally Posted by Green Light:
This is all about you, which is fine, but I think some of us might have additional observations if it were more about the prospect.

 

Is he obsessing too much? Does he understand how important a decision college is for him? Is he in pain that he is looking to share?

 

Someone once gave me sage advice about youth sports. If the player doesn't have a problem, there is no problem.

That is right, I am writing this from a parent's perspective.  He has a more laid back approach about it, which is perfect.  He just needs to focus on being a better ballplayer and student.  When the time comes to make a decision he can go through the heartache of making the right decision, but no reason for him to obsess over it.  17 year olds see life different than 50 year olds, which is great.  If you as a parent do not have anxiety that is fine, but I do not know any parents that fit in that category.

That's great. Glad to hear the player is taking things (relatively) calmly. In that case I have no comments or suggestions to offer him now.

 

As for Midlo's post....which I agree with.....I think you may have missed one of his points. When you say "I will take that chance", it's not about you accepting consequences for the chances you are taking, it's about the consequences for your son's recruiting experience.

Last edited by Green Light
Originally Posted by bacdorslider:

who has not sent an email or filled out a questionaire for a player,  I know my sons summer coach does it all the time. what's the difference?

 

Those emails or questionnaires were not directly addressed to your son. If they were, then he should've filled them out, not his summer coach.

 

+1 from me, Midlo. But, of course, hindsight is 20/20.

 

 

 

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