First time poster so here it goes.

My son is a 2022 and I’m learning about the baseball recruiting process for a position player and where we should focus our efforts. This site has some great information and I’ve learned a great deal! Just wondering the most effective way to help him achieve his goal of playing college baseball. It seems you can spend a fortune on everything that’s out there! Since I’m the “CFO”, I’m looking for the best bang for my buck. Much of the input here for sophomores and younger seems to be pitching.

He’s 16, 5’11”, 165, 6.9 60, 85 EV, 90 Outfield Velo, hits for average gap to gap but warning track power, 4.0 gpa and hasn’t taken the ACT or SAT. 

Any input will be appreciated.

 

 

Original Post

How is the travel team he plays for? More specifically how is the organization he plays for? Are there older/younger teams, is it a well established program or a local startup, have they sent older players to colleges your son might be interested in? 

Is he playing varsity as a sophomore? Might be worth it to take him to a cheaper local showcase and see what the feedback is. 

Each path is unique.  Just based on the numbers, description you provided and the position, he is not currently on track for P5 D1 schools, so there is not an immediate rush to be seen, as most others recruit a little later.

Remember that the whole process is to determine best college fit and the primary purpose of college is to get the proper education and training for one's working career.  So, finding the right academic fit with the right major should be very high on the list.  

You don't have to break the bank.  Also understand that a vast majority of college student athletes ultimately choose a school that is either in-state or a neighboring state (See charts from Recruitinginsights).  This, too, can make the search and the process much easier, unless he has a particular major in mind that can't be found in those schools nearby.

 OF is the hardest position to get recruited from.  He has decent speed and a strong arm, so that is a great start.  But, the primary focus will be on the hit tool.  He must continue to develop as a hitter and he must play regularly against good competition/pitching.  There are many ways to go about accomplishing both but the good competition is most likely to come with some involvement in a decent travel organization.  Good instruction will help keep him on track with development but he must also have the mindset to put in a lot of extra work on a regular basis.  

It will be tremendously helpful to have qualified and connected advocates that can speak on the player's behalf and as reference when the player is communicating with schools.  This can come in the form of travel coaches, HS coaches, mentors, private instructors, etc.  They can also be used as sounding boards to check if you are fishing in the right ponds.

In addition to asking specific questions on this forum, you can also search any topic.  Everything is covered here - you found a great resource.  If you haven't already, you and your son need to put together a recruiting plan.

Once you have an initial list of target schools, based on his unique combination of academic interest, playing ability, social fit, weather tolerance, acceptable distance from home, etc., you can tailor the action plan to get in front of the right schools at the right time and to align himself with the right instructor and travel program where applicable.  But mostly, the player must continue efforts to maximize his playing ability.

The process typically involves some carefully chosen mix of instruction, travel, camps, showcases and the use of a decent recruiting video matched up with an organized communication campaign but, for many, not all of these are necessary (or realistic).  There is good instruction available at little or no charge if necessary.  There are travel organizations that are much less costly than others and still provide a competitive environment.  Mostly, the process is about good players making sure they are seen by the appropriate schools that they are interested in (and vice versa).  

 

Last edited by cabbagedad

His travel team is well established (maybe 20 years) not a national org but I believe well connected. They have teams at all age levels. His team will play in the larger PG and Vtool tournaments this summer. They’ve sent many players over the years to all levels. 

Yes, he’s playing varsity 

I’ve heard that PG and PBR showcases are $$$. I’m not familiar with others that do showcases but cheap sounds like a good place to start!

What is his projected height? How tall are you? How tall is his mother? How athletic were you and his mother?

I’m asking to get a feel for how much further a 5’11 16yo running a 6.9 with warning track power progresses. Without significant advancement it appears he’s a D3 prospect. There’s nothing wrong with being a D3 prospect unless you’re sending him to D1 prospect events.

Is the 4.0 an unweighted gpa (4.0 of 4.0)? If not, what is his unweighted? SAT/ACT scores? If not, PSAT?

Last edited by RJM

As far as height, I believe  he’s close to being done. Maybe get to 6’ but not much more. He’s added 5-7 lbs this last off season in the weight room. His GPA is unweighted. Nothing beyond High School as far as parents athletic ability. 

Keep in mind this is without seeing him play. It’s based on two posts. Without significant improvement he’s not fast enough to play D1 centerfield. He doesn’t have the combination of power and speed to play corner at his speed. His speed would be ok with more power. He’s probably a quality D3 top academic prospect. 

If he grows enough as a player by next summer there will still be D1 mid major opportunities. D3 recruiting is post junior summer. So, he has time. I’m not sure there would be value in doing major showcases. Head First and similar seem to be the way to go.

This coming summer would be a good time to get on the radar to set up next summer’s interest and offers.

Good luck.

Last edited by RJM

Thanks for the input! Was wondering if there is some sort of measurable breakdown showing loosely where a kid might fit in terms of his tools? I have looked on here but haven’t found anything. 

Here are guidelines of the levels from NCSA:

What do college baseball scouts look for in a center fielder?

Division 1

  • Height: 5’9’’–6’2’’
  • Weight: 175–210 lbs.
  • Infield velocity: 87–95+ MPH from the outfield
  • 60-yard dash: below 6.7
  • Infield velocity: 87–95+ MPH from the outfield
  • OBP: .500
  • Slugging: .600 (minimum 2 at bats per game)

Division 2

  • Height: 5’11”
  • Weight: 180 lbs.
  • 60-yard dash: below 6.9
  • OBP: .450
  • SLG: .500 (minimum 2 at bats per game)

Division 3 and NAIA

  • Height: 5'11''
  • Weight: 180 lbs.
  • 60-yard dash: 6.9 or below
  • OF velocity: 80+ MPH
  • OBP: .400
  • Slugging: .500

Junior college

  • Height: 5’10”
  • Weight: 170 lbs.
  • 60-yard dash: 7.0 or below
  • OF velocity: 78+ MPH
  • OBP: .350
  • Slugging: .450 

Back to Top ^

What do college baseball scouts look for in a corner outfielder?

Division 1

  • Height: 5’11”
  • Weight: 180 lbs.
  • 60-yard dash: below 6.8
  • OF velocity: 87+ MPH (verified by a neutral source)
  • Slugging: at least 5 HRs as a high school junior and senior
  • .750 (minimum 2 at bats per game)
  • OBP: .500

Division 2

  • Height: 5’11”
  • Weight: 180 lbs.
  • 60-yard dash: below 7.0
  • Velocity from the OF: low 80s at least, with the potential to improve
  • Slugging: Multiple HRs as a high school junior and senior

Division 3/NAIA

  • Height: 5'11"
  • Weight: 180 lbs.
  • 60-yard dash: 6.9 or below
  • OF velocity: 80+ MPH
  • OB%: .400
  • Slugging: .650

Junior college

  • Height: 5’10”
  • Weight: 170 lbs.
  • 60-yard dash: 7.0 or below
  • OF velocity: 78+ MPH

 

The thing about power is it often comes to hitters in college. Even then, many are quality line drive hitters who only drive mistakes out of the park.

Projectability comes into play. College coaches can look at a high school player and visualize him with 20-25 pounds heavier with muscle. 

Beloweye10 posted:

First time poster so here it goes.

My son is a 2022 and I’m learning about the baseball recruiting process for a position player and where we should focus our efforts. This site has some great information and I’ve learned a great deal! Just wondering the most effective way to help him achieve his goal of playing college baseball. It seems you can spend a fortune on everything that’s out there! Since I’m the “CFO”, I’m looking for the best bang for my buck. Much of the input here for sophomores and younger seems to be pitching.

He’s 16, 5’11”, 165, 6.9 60, 85 EV, 90 Outfield Velo, hits for average gap to gap but warning track power, 4.0 gpa and hasn’t taken the ACT or SAT. 

Any input will be appreciated.

 

 

A 2022 with those measurables certainly has the very same tools as other D1 commits including P5, don't let anyone tell you different! All you have to do is take a look at the kids from all classes currently committed using PG data available to anyone--which I am sure you have already done. Whether he commits to a D1 is really up to him as long as he has the ability to improve every year and be able to show it on the field.

Use this forum as a way to educate yourself but remember only your son can impact his journey and everyone's journey is very different. Best thing for him in the next year is to hit the weights. I have seen plenty of D1 players in the last week who clearly still need to hit the weights! It pretty easy to spot the players who take it seriously

I agree with CabbageDad that OF is a difficult position to get recruited for.  From what I've seen in my son's college baseball experience, most coaches will recruit a CF then fill the corner outfield with guys that can hit while teaching them to play the outfield.   If they don't hit, then the coach goes to the bench looking for someone who can.   Hitting is absolutely key.

If recruited = passion + skill + exposure + persistence + luck then it seems to me you've got to solve for the exposure part of the equation which means you're going to need to (heavily) lean on your travel organization AND find individual showcases or recruiting prospect camps (not skills camps) that meet your son's goals.  This is essentially what my son (RHP) did initially.   His travel HC introduced him to a number of college RCs that began recruiting him.  The RCs started a dialogue with him and watched him play numerous times before eventually  offering.   While these activities were going on, my son was also attending individual showcases and camps where his travel HC did not have a relationship.   We did keep the travel HC updated on everything we were doing on our own...this is really important.   Ultimately, it was through our strategy & efforts that my son found the best school based on his goals.   

Your son has impressive metrics and I believe he'll have some opportunities especially if he does well on the SAT/ACT.   I think you need to work on your exposure strategy and share it with your travel coach so he can best help you.   I hope this helps in some small way.

Good luck!

Last edited by fenwaysouth

Those NCSA numbers are the only ones out there, you can study them until your eyes cross, and they will make you crazy.  If you have a borderline D1/D3 kid, then the only thing you can do is work to improve, play the game as well as you can, and understand that there are also great options at D3.  We were looking at those numbers as my son went through; in spring of junior year he worked his butt off to get his 60-time down below 6.7, finally did it in August before senior year, too late for the D1s that might have been interested.  The kids he knew who were below 6.7 earlier did get mid-major D1 offers after they were seen at camps/showcases or playing summer after junior year.  My son wrote a pretty good college essay about how he did it, so I guess it was worth something. 

I'd just note that in his essay, he wrote that he didn't see why his 60-time mattered, and so he hadn't taken it as seriously until he realized it did matter.  So, I'm not sure it was physically possible for him to get there before that, but maybe he could have done it. 

In 1999, our American National Team played the Japan National team in Cooperstown NEW York at the "Field of Dreams". Sam Fuld played in our Area Code games and Goodwill Series. Sam is from New Hampshire and later a Stanford grad and MLB player, now Phillies Executive.

Before the game, I mentioned the outstanding ability of the Japan players and the "fierce battle" ahead. Japan TV was filming this game to 40 million people. The Cooperstown outfield had no warning track and a brick wall.

In the 3rd inning, a Japan hitter hit a long line drive over Sam's head and at full speed he hit the wall and made the catch. I ran to the outfield and Sam's head was "bloody" from hitting the wall.

Together, we walked off and Sam said, "Bob you were right this is a fierce battle".

The amazing "6th Tool", is very difficult to measure. It needs to be exhibited.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Fuld

Bob

Last edited by Consultant

Like some have mentioned you control the narrative more than you think. And remember the old saying, "If you can hit I'll find a spot for you to play" holds a lot of truth.

But if you want to talk more about the "numbers" I'll keep it short and simple. CF you will need to be fast!!! Corners will need to be best friends with their bats. I recommend that you spend time in the gym getting more "explosive". This not only helps in lowering your 60, but it also can help take WTP to legit pop. Ultimately and truthfully, a lot of coaches at the college level look for MIFs when recruiting. Most of the time he is only going to play 2 of them in a MIF position. the 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, etc.... need to find a place to play. You beat them out by being visually faster (CF) or hitting bombs (Corner). If you can do both, more power to you! 

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