Going off to college is exciting, know there is a whole new baseball world that's waiting for you is even more exciting. I just finished my freshman year of college and I wanted to share some of the things I wish I had known/ I learned. 

Disclaimer: This is written from a players perspective of college baseball, so there will some things that parents probably won't want to know about. 

 

  1. Understand that you are a freshman: It doesn't matter if you're the number 1 recruit in your class or a walk-on, you're the lowest man on the totem pole and will have to do all the work upperclassmen don't want to. 
  2. Leave HS in the past: Don't be the guy that shows up to the first day of workouts in his HS gear. Frankly, everything you did in HS, doesn't matter anymore; awards, stats, recognitions, wins, losses, etc. Try not to bring it up as much as possible. Also just leave all your HS shirts and stuff at home.
  3. Learn some feel: If you don't know what this means, having feel is basically a summation of character traits that make you likable and not a jerk. Things like knowing your audience, understanding your tone, knowing when to speak and when not to speak, common sense, being a good teammate, etc. For example Veteran pitcher hangs a curveball and gives up a mammo nuke then gets pulled. He goes over to the bench and is sitting by himself. Going over to him and telling him if he just got that pitch down he would've been good. That's having no feel and will probably get you beat up. 
  4. The Fall: The fall is your time to earn respect from the returners. Your performance in the fall will not earn you a spot in the lineup but will earn you a roster spot. Compete every day, on the field, in the weight room, during conditioning. Your best bet during fall practices is to keep your ears and eyes open and your mouth shut. Observe how the veterans starters approach practice.
  5. Parties: Go to them, if drinking isn't your thing then don't. But still, go to have a good time. The best memories you're going to make in college are going to be off the field. And the whole "college baseball is a full-time job" thing is a myth. You're going to have more downtime than you think, it's just a matter of using your time during the day for classwork so you can have fun at night and on weekends. 
  6. Social Status: You are a baseball player, that means you'll be treated differently by the administration, professors, and your peers. The administration won't like you because they hate athletes for whatever reason, professors will either love or hate you, no in-between. As for students, the girls will love you. Yes, cleat chasers are a thing and will make themselves known very quickly. You'll get along with the other athletes except for probably soccer because they're soft. The regular male students probably won't like you because you're better than them. All in all, be friends with athletes, hang out with athlete/sorority girls and you'll be fine. That being said, no means no and the absence of no doesn't mean yes, you idiot. 
  7. Hazing: You'll probably be hazed, it won't be anything too bad. That's all I'm going to say
  8. New Gear: One of the best days in college baseball is when all the new gear arrives, it's sick. Don't be the guy that wears it around campus all the time. Everyone will know you are a baseball player by the way you carry yourself and the company you keep, so there's no reason to wear baseball branded shirts, shorts, hats all the time.
  9. Game Hats: Game hats are for the baseball field only. Not class, not parties, not the cafeteria.......the baseball field only. 
  10. Returners: If there is a baseball party or a returner invites you to something, go. The best way to get in good graces so to speak with the returners is just to be normal person. Don't try to inflate yourself or anything like that, just be you. 
  11. Don't be afraid to ask questions: If you aren't sure about something or how something is going to work just ask an upperclassmen. Because at the end of the day, we all have the same goal: to win a national championship. But this is where having feel comes in, you have to pick your time to ask right or you run the risk of getting roasted. 

 

College baseball is fun. It will be the best 4 years of your life bar none. However, freshman year will suck because quite frankly you are a bitch. There will be good days and there will be bad days, you just have to keep your head down and keep going. 

God's Speed, Frosh

Original Post

Wow! That’s one of the best posts ever made here. Results may vary based on the demands of your degree. But there is time for a social life. All the teammate and baseball stuff is dead on. 

I was standing outside a hotel one night when a university logo’ed bus pulled up. On the bus was a friend and former teammate of my daughter I hadn’t seen in a year. We chatted for a while. Then she was called. She smiled and said, “I may be leading the country in scoring. But I’m still a freshman. I have to go carry equipment.” Regardless of your success don’t big time upperclassmen. 

I faced reality and gave the following advice on girls/cleat chasers ... Be careful they’re not investing in their future by getting pregnant. You all enter D1 as pro prospects (leaving as a pro prospect is another discussion).   Girls can change their minds on “consensual” in the morning. Make sure you know who you’re with. 

A Yale basketball player was kicked out spring semester and not allowed to compete in the NCAA tournament because his girlfriend was mad in the morning. Yale pulled his academic scholarship and wouldn’t provide transcripts for transfer until he paid the bill. It took a few years to be settled in court. Yale wanted payment for the semester they didn’t let him finish. 

Don't put yourself in stupid places. Years later Reid Seligman says he feels “alleged Duke rapist” is attached to his name. All he did wrong was be drunk at a party with a lying stripper. 

Go44dad posted:

Hey BLUD15!  Anything on texting your parents every now and then?

They are going to need things form y'all and y'all will need to know things from them. I wouldn't expect daily communication because things do get busy during the school year but several conversations a week is about the norm, I would say.

I think the thing that surprised our whole family is how much there are actually two teams in college baseball — a team of pitchers, and a team of everyone else. My son headed off to college with a teammate from HS. They lived on the same floor, about three doors apart, one is a pitcher, one a MIF.  We would ask our son "how's the SS doing?"

"I don't know, never see him."

Heard from the other boys parents that they got the same thing in reverse. Just something we really didn't expect.

2019&21 Dad posted:

Great post. I'm guessing that at nerdy D3 colleges "your mileage may vary" on some of these points like social status and parties, but there's alot of universal truths there too. I passed it on to my rising Frosh. Thanks!

With all due respect, the biggest party weekend I ever experienced in my college years was on the Harvard Yard my Freshman year with high school friends from there, Dartmouth, Brown, Princeton, and Williams. Partying is virtually universal on college campuses of all stripes, colors, and levels.

Prepster posted:
2019&21 Dad posted:

Great post. I'm guessing that at nerdy D3 colleges "your mileage may vary" on some of these points like social status and parties, but there's alot of universal truths there too. I passed it on to my rising Frosh. Thanks!

With all due respect, the biggest party weekend I ever experienced in my college years was on the Harvard Yard my Freshman year with high school friends from there, Dartmouth, Brown, Princeton, and Williams. Partying is virtually universal on college campuses of all stripes, colors, and levels.

Same - China Bowl...

2019&21 Dad posted:

Great post. I'm guessing that at nerdy D3 colleges "your mileage may vary" on some of these points like social status and parties, but there's alot of universal truths there too. I passed it on to my rising Frosh. Thanks!

Mileage may vary with any STEM major at any level. I know what my kids put into being science and math majors and playing. Engineering is more challenging.

I have searched this site and the web but really can’t find much info. I know all schools have fall ball and this how the team is finalized. Is there a schedule any where, is it mainly inter squad? The NCAA site said the coaches get 8 hours per week, is that right?  Any info would be appreciated.

Nonamedad posted:

I have searched this site and the web but really can’t find much info. I know all schools have fall ball and this how the team is finalized. Is there a schedule any where, is it mainly inter squad? The NCAA site said the coaches get 8 hours per week, is that right?  Any info would be appreciated.

Have you visited the schools website?

Nonamedad posted:

Yes.....nothing.

It will depend on the school.  You might want your son to ask the coach if they are planning to post a schedule on their website.   The reason why I'm recommending your son do it is for him to show the coach that he is taking responsibility and very interested in knowing everything about the program.   Also, if this is his first year in college, it will also give him the opportunity to mental prepare for the fall.

Iowamom23 posted:

I went back and looked. Our fall schedule was announced Aug. 31 and included three JUCO games and an intrasquad tournament, along with a scout day.

I thought they played JUCOs,,,,,did it list how many games total, including intra squad. 

I will add that in the fall, you will probably need baseball pants and a ball cap. From my sons experience, Uniforms were not handed out till the team was decided. In fall he used his own Baseball pants and cleats. A ball cap from HS or a Summer team. what ever he had handy. And whatever Dry fit shirt was clean. 

Once the team was decided and cuts were made Uniforms and hats would be supplied. He still used his own Pants for practices through out his college career. 

This probably pertains more to D3 and NAIA than other levels. 

I didn’t read all previous posts, but:

get prepared to compete against guys who are as good or better than you

wrap your mind around losing time at a position because you are young

capitalize on every moment you are given to perform 

outwork everybody else, regardless of any stigmas associated with being a “try hard”

dont be “that” freshman

 

 

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