Catchers, Arm Injuries

I know this article is a couple of years old but, if you have time to read it, I'm curious as to what any of the experts out here might think. This is of particular interest to me with my 2019 C cleared to begin a throwing program after rest/recovery/PT for a shoulder impingement. Starting next week, he'll be working with a well-respected trainer in our area, specifically on throwing motion, but I'm doing quite a bit of my own research so that I can completely understand the mechanics, and keep an eye on any hitches that might be there, to avoid recurrence.

https://baseballrebellion.com/...hrowing-runners-out/

Thanks for any feedback!

Original Post

Tequila, I don't want to over step here because my son is just a 2023 - but I have some thoughts on the subject.  He recently returned to active play from an elbow injury - evulsion/fracture.  Personally, I think the problem was the fact that the whole season he had been catching and pitching for his team.  But, I found the article interesting.  In all the "specialized" catching instruction he has gotten these last 3 years - everyone teaches the 'rake the face' thing so that the ball gets as quickly as possible to the position in back of the helmet for the catcher to throw.  From what I read, it seems like the author endorses more of circular motion - but basically says there is no actual time lost there as long as the lower half is still engaging during that time anyway.  I think it sounds like it makes sense, but I wonder if the scouts that are out there today will just see kids who throw this way as 'lazy' or 'untrained'.  I mean, if they are hitting that magical pop time number of sub-2.0.....does it matter?

Hi Carlos and thanks for the response. If I'm understanding what "rake the face" means, I don't think my son has ever been taught that method but there are as many opinions on this stuff as there are instructors and armchair quarterbacks. Yes the number is important but there is much more to throwing runners out than that. Kevin Schnall with Coastal Carolina preaches that they throw a ton of runners out with a 2.15 because it's timed, accurate, and repeatable. A 1.8 isn't much good if it's not on, or near, the bag or if a pitcher isn't doing the things required to keep the runners close.

I can't say that I know what coaches and scouts think about it one way or the other but guys have success with both methods. Injury doesn't necessarily mean something is wrong with mechanics of course. It's an interesting debate and if you just want to talk catching at some point, since your son is so young, I can give you some insight as to my son's experiences. Just PM me and I'm happy to share what I've learned or answer any questions. I really had no knowledge of catching before my son started playing baseball but he's basically been a "CO" since he was eight years old . Take care!

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