So does anyone here have some experience either wearing them or having a child wear them? The kid has been diagnosed. Wondering about their tendency to move. Goes without saying in the middle of an at-bat this would be a problem.

Original Post

I have contacts and they have worked perfectly fine. Have not had them fall out in the middle of a game. I always keep a 2nd pair in my bag with me just in case. 

SomeBaseballDad posted:

So does anyone here have some experience either wearing them or having a child wear them? The kid has been diagnosed. Wondering about their tendency to move. Goes without saying in the middle of an at-bat this would be a problem.

Does he have to wear RGP lenses? I have them and they are a PIA. I’ve had them for years. If you find the right eye doc you should be able to get fitted into something that is tolerable most of the time. However, sometimes a breeze or a small piece of dust or dirt can cause the worst pain ever

Mine also wears the Toric. I agree with the idea of having an extra pair in your bag at all times. As a PO, having them fall out in an at bat hasn't been an issue..

Not sure if he will have to wear RGB but toric yes. My understanding is they have to remain in place but something as simple as blinking can cause them to rotate, resulting in blurred vision. 

My son has never complained about them moving & causing blurred vision. He bats, plays OF, & pitches no problem. 

I have worn contacts for 25 years and really like Acuvue daily disposable contact.  They also make them for astigmatism although I have an astigmatism and never used contacts specific to the condition.

The great thing about daily is there is no science experiment to maintain.  No chemicals to use, storage and cleaning procedures, etc.  Doesn't matter if one falls out, gets lost, etc.  Just pop a fresh one in and carry on.

The Acuvue is one we're looking at because of the method they use to stay in place. Definitely going daily. Heck he may not even ware them except while playing. His vision is 20/20 which is fine for day to day, but when it comes to hitting a 90 mph baseball maybe not so much. Plus his depth perception was off so the hope is contacts will help with that. 

SomeBaseballDad posted:

The Acuvue is one we're looking at because of the method they use to stay in place. Definitely going daily. Heck he may not even ware them except while playing. His vision is 20/20 which is fine for day to day, but when it comes to hitting a 90 mph baseball maybe not so much. Plus his depth perception was off so the hope is contacts will help with that. 

Depending on the severity of the astigmatism he may not need lenses specific to the condition.  Your optimistic should be able to give him a trial of both types.

My son has worn Alcon Dailies toric lenses for ~6 years, and has never had any issues.  Daily lenses are the way to go--the plastic waste from the packaging is kind of a shame, but no concerns about getting a teenage boy to properly clean and care for them.  And keeping an extra pair around is dead easy.  Keep a small bottle of saline drops in your baseball bag, too.  My son played a game 2 weeks ago in high winds--his lenses were drying out pretty badly on the field.

As you probably already know, toric lenses are a good deal more expensive.  But as for the kinds of problems you mention about vision changes due to the lenses moving?  Never been an issue, and never mentioned by my son's eye doc.  (And fwiw, he is a PO now, but wore the lenses for several years when he was also a position player/hitter.)

I personally have worn contacts and I have an astigmatism. I used them pretty much only for cycling and running. I could not get used to them and I eventually went back to glasses. The weighted part of the contact would kind of "float" in my eye and really irritate and blur my vision.

My son (college soph) wears RX Oakleys to pitch. It's hit first season doing so, after he told us the he had trouble picking up the signs during night games. He is happy with the improvement but he does have the usual complaints about glasses. Sweat, smudging, glare, staying put on his face during his delivery, etc.

 

I posted earlier about having RGP’s. I was at my eye doc on Tuesday and she said it was a Toric lens. So I highly recommend that 

Coincidentally, I think I may have picked up the virus while there. 

My eye doc called me today to tell me about a procedure called CXL. It basically flattens the astigmatism so you wear normal lenses. Check it out. I made an appt for 5/6, soonest they would schedule because of covid 

In my 20's, I developed a rare corneal condition called Keratoconus that is not correctable with glasses.  As a result, I have worn contacts for 30 years (soft extended wear, hard, and soft daily wear) so I consider myself kind of an unwilling expert in the area.  While the old hard lenses provided the best vision, they moved around too much when playing sports, swimming, etc...  The soft lenses are great if they can give you good enough vision correction, but they can move around sometimes, especially if you get some dust particles on the lense or try to swim in them.  Recently, I was fitted with Schleral lenses, which are a hard plastic but kind of suction to your eye with a film of saline as a buffer.  All I can say is the Schleral lenses are life-changing.  Not only did they bring my vision back to almost 20-20 (it is terrible without them)  but they don't move around on my eyes when playing sports or even swimming.  It takes a little getting used to putting them in and taking them out (different from standard contacts), but the little extra work is well worth it.  I'm not sure if getting Schelerals is worth it for people needing only a small correction, but for any others (especially athletes) I think they would be hard to beat.  

JDUBSDAD posted:

In my 20's, I developed a rare corneal condition called Keratoconus that is not correctable with glasses.  As a result, I have worn contacts for 30 years (soft extended wear, hard, and soft daily wear) so I consider myself kind of an unwilling expert in the area.  While the old hard lenses provided the best vision, they moved around too much when playing sports, swimming, etc...  The soft lenses are great if they can give you good enough vision correction, but they can move around sometimes, especially if you get some dust particles on the lense or try to swim in them.  Recently, I was fitted with Schleral lenses, which are a hard plastic but kind of suction to your eye with a film of saline as a buffer.  All I can say is the Schleral lenses are life-changing.  Not only did they bring my vision back to almost 20-20 (it is terrible without them)  but they don't move around on my eyes when playing sports or even swimming.  It takes a little getting used to putting them in and taking them out (different from standard contacts), but the little extra work is well worth it.  I'm not sure if getting Schelerals is worth it for people needing only a small correction, but for any others (especially athletes) I think they would be hard to beat.  

I have keratoconus as well. My eye doc also talked about those lenses. Apparently they are phenomenal if you can get used to them.  She said if I can get the CXL it would be better than the Schleral lenses. Basically, the RGP’s won’t work now because the cornea is so steep it rubs against the lens. 

TerribleBPthrower,

I am scheduled to get the CXL as soon as the virus thing has settled down.  They don't think the CXL procedure will help my vision much, but it is supposed to stop the progression of the disease.  Note:  My eye doctor said the CXL  procedure may change my vision some, but she would just get me new schleral lenses if that happens (for little or no extra charge).  She didn't want me to have to wait until after the CXL to get the schlerals because she knew how much they would help me.  Feel free to PM me if you have any questions.

BTW, I love your screen name.  I'm sure my son thinks I should have chosen something similar

 

 

 

 

anotherparent posted:
TerribleBPthrower posted:

Coincidentally, I think I may have picked up the virus while there. 

I hope that you get through it well.

Primary doc says I had/have it but wasn’t tested because symptoms weren’t “severe”. Midday Friday I suddenly had trouble breathing. It was much different than anything I’ve felt before. I could breath, but it was labored. Then I felt like I had a fever and really bad chills. By Saturday my breathing was back to normal but I had a headache and chills all day. Fever never got too high. By Sunday I was feeling good enough to start moving around again.  She told me I can’t leave the house for 14 days. 

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