Division II vs JUCO transfer rules

My 2019 grad has gotten some JUCO offers but is not good enough yet to get a D1 offer. For his college career his ultimate dream is to play for Bama. He hasn’t gotten any D2 offers mainly because he hasn’t actively made contact with any D2 schools to let them know he would like to play there. His mindset has been to go the JUCO route and hope he improves enough to get an offer from Bama or another D1 school for his last two years of college. If that fails he can always go D2/D3 or NAIA. Now he is getting word that some D2 schools are interested in him so we have to figure out what all his options are.

Transferring from a JUCO to a D1 school does not require the athlete to sit out of year. Transferring from a D2 school to a D1 school requires the athlete to sit out a year with some exceptions. What I am trying to figure out are the exceptions. According to the NCAA website, a D2 baseball player transferring to a D1 school may be eligible to compete immediately if they were not recruited by their original school and they have never received an athletic scholarship.

My son is going to get a full ride tuition scholarship regardless of what level he plays at thanks to the Alabama GI bill so whereever he plays it will be as a walkon. What exactly does the “if they were not recruited by their original school” mean? Schools at all levels recruit walkon players all the time. Coaches invite walkon players to take official visits to the campus and they communicate with via phone calls and texts. Does all that count as getting recruited?

If my son plays for a D2 school as a walkon and that still requires him to sit out a year if he transfers to D1 then he may just stick with the JUCO route.

Original Post

13.02.14.1 Recruited Prospective Student-Athlete. Actions by staff members or athletics representatives that cause a prospective student-athlete to become a recruited prospective student-athlete at that institution are:
(Revised: 1/10/90, 1/11/94 effective 8/1/94, 1/10/05 effective 8/1/05, 12/13/05, 4/26/17 effective 8/1/17, 4/25/18)
(a) Providing the prospective student-athlete with an official visit;
(b) Having an arranged, in-person, off-campus encounter with the prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete’s family members; or
(c) Issuing a National Letter of Intent or the institution’s written offer of athletically related financial aid to the prospective student-athlete. Issuing a written offer of athletically related financial aid to a prospective student-athlete to attend a summer session prior to full-time enrollment does not cause the prospective student-athlete to become recruited.

"Transferring from a JUCO to a DI school does not require the athlete to sit out a year" as long as the athlete satisfies the academic requirements for a JUCO transfer.  We had a number of calls this past Fall from JUCO walk-on transfers who were told they wouldn't be eligible this year because they didn't meet the academic requirements (either were misadvised at the JUCO, or just didn't ask the right questions).  

Thanks all who have replied.

If my son doesn’t meet the academic requirement to transfer from a JUCO to a D1 then he is in a world of hurt and baseball is the least of his worries. Bad grades will cost him his full ride tuition scholarship from the Alabama GI bill.

Sounds like transferring from a D2 to a D1 is a lot harder than transferring from a D1 to D2.

 

 

 

 

ride 

Bamadad posted:

Thanks all who have replied.

If my son doesn’t meet the academic requirement to transfer from a JUCO to a D1 then he is in a world of hurt and baseball is the least of his worries. Bad grades will cost him his full ride tuition scholarship from the Alabama GI bill.

Sounds like transferring from a D2 to a D1 is a lot harder than transferring from a D1 to D2.

 

 

 

 

ride 

Transfers from D1 to D2 usually occur when a player realizes (or is told) that he isn't good enough to play at the D1 level.  Sometimes there are other factors but that is the most common reason. However, the reverse is not true.  Players that perform well in D2 are not encouraged to transfer to D1 and this practice isn't facilitated.  D2 is not a proving ground for D1. Nor is D3.  Only JUCO fits that description. Having said that I will also add that most JUCO players don't move on to D1 schools. Some do - but only the very best ones.  Most JUCO players that move on (in the SW area of the US) end up at D2 schools.  Point being, the chances of your son ever playing baseball at Alabama are slim and none.  My recommendation is that you expand your horizons if playing college baseball is important to your son.  Not meaning to throw a wet blanket on you - just being realistic. 

Bamadad posted:

Thanks all who have replied.

If my son doesn’t meet the academic requirement to transfer from a JUCO to a D1 then he is in a world of hurt and baseball is the least of his worries. Bad grades will cost him his full ride tuition scholarship from the Alabama GI bill.

Sounds like transferring from a D2 to a D1 is a lot harder than transferring from a D1 to D2.

 

 

 

 

ride 

Bama, be aware... when Rick says "as long as the athlete satisfies the academic requirements for a JUCO transfer.", I'm pretty sure he is referring more to cumulative credits that apply to a student's major..  not so much about poor grades.  Transfer requirements vary by school and create a great deal of confusion.  In our experience, we have found that far too many JC counselors are not well versed enough on this.  It is a legitimate concern when weighing the option of going the JC route if one cares about not having to tag on an extra year or two of college to complete required coursework toward degree.

What chance does he have to improve enough to play D1 in a year? 

Does he have a very projectable body?

I think that needs to be considered. Juco probably makes most sense for projetable late bloomers (i.e tall and thin) or very raw but athletic guys who need more baseball experience or some mechanical overhaul.

So honestly asses how much room for growth there is. Sure he will work hard but don't expect magical improvement and ask yourself why he will make the jump this year that he hasn't done before. There is always room to get better but you have to be honest with yourself.

That means if you are 5"11, 190 and you already trained extremely hard and you are mechanically polished D2 or D3 might be the better option.

But if you have some realistic room for growth go for the juco option and work your butt off to get better.

Dominik85 posted:

What chance does he have to improve enough to play D1 in a year? 

Does he have a very projectable body?

I think that needs to be considered. Juco probably makes most sense for projetable late bloomers (i.e tall and thin) or very raw but athletic guys who need more baseball experience or some mechanical overhaul.

So honestly asses how much room for growth there is. Sure he will work hard but don't expect magical improvement and ask yourself why he will make the jump this year that he hasn't done before. There is always room to get better but you have to be honest with yourself.

That means if you are 5"11, 190 and you already trained extremely hard and you are mechanically polished D2 or D3 might be the better option.

But if you have some realistic room for growth go for the juco option and work your butt off to get better.

 

Dominik,

Those are good points. IMO his projectability is high.  6’2” 175lb lefty pitcher.   He is the “crafty lefty” stereotype.  Fastball sits 82-84 but he has great control and nasty secondary pitches.   He is also a late bloomer.   He is 18 and only recently started getting beard stubble on his chin.  He has a good workout regimen but has a hard time putting on muscle mass.   His coach says his biomechanics are good and that he just needs to get stronger.  My assumption is that the S&C regimen at a JUCO or D2 combined with completing the growth process will help him get to 90+.  

He will most likely go the JUCO route since it is ideal for players like him still going thru the growth process.  

Since it sounds like he is most likely heading toward the JUCO route, be sure he approaches that research the same way he would if he were going for a 4-year school.  There are numerous good threads on this site about JUCO advice.  Search the JUCO rosters to see who has success moving their players onto D1 teams--that is the best way to truly evaluate a JUCO program's baseball success, not wins and losses.  And remember that the competition to play at JUCO is every bit as tough as it is at the 4-year programs--maybe even more so since the kids have such a short window of time to prove themselves and they can only do that on the field with playing time.

And as others have posted here, the academic credits that actually count and transfer are the biggest factor.  If his goal is to go to Bama no matter if the baseball does not materialize, then be sure the JUCO is a consistent link of students to Bama.  Instate JUCOs typically sync up well with instate D1s, but there are differences going out-of-state.

Good luck with the search.

 

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