[QUOTE]Originally posted by TRhit:
if u trust your parenting it is case closed[/QUOTE

Tell that to anyone that lost a loved one due to drunk driving. Good luck!
I am not suggesting that all people who drink go out and drive but the national stats say that this is a
problem that has significant consequences.
Our educational institutions are failing miserably by turning their backs as if the problem of underage drinking is not a serious problem.
I once talked to a security guard at a college about these parties and his orders were to "watch a certain area closely because that is where the inebriated students crossed".
Our educational institutions are failing miserably by turning their backs as if the problem of underage drinking is not a serious problem.
[/QUOTE]
It's called "college" Jaggerz. These "kids" are over 18 and can fight in our wars, vote, and be tried as adults. The University's job is to educate, not to babysit. Again, I'm sure there are some schools that chaperone their students, but not many.
quote:
Originally posted by jaggerz:
Tell that to anyone that lost a loved one due to drunk driving. Good luck!
I am not suggesting that all people who drink go out and drive but the national stats say that this is a
problem that has significant consequences.
Our educational institutions are failing miserably by turning their backs as if the problem of underage drinking is not a serious problem.
I once talked to a security guard at a college about these parties and his orders were to "watch a certain area closely because that is where the inebriated students crossed".


This entire topic is about drinking on official visits and along the way has taken some twists and turns.
We all know someone who has lost a loved one to a drunk driver and I am sure we all know someone whose life was altered because he/she got caught DUI.

This, IMO has nothing to do with what goes on at a college campus or football weekend.

Not that I don't disagree, one thing I can't figure out is that while there are rules on campuses and punishments for underage drinking, all of that stuff goes out the window on football saturdays.

As posted above by fanofgame, if you do not want your college age players to not be exposed to what goes on, then you need to send them to a dry campus.

FWIW, I know a few young people my sons age who never went off to college and have problems with alcohol.

I am in agreement with Aleebaba, parents shouldn't expect anyone to babysit college students, if you do, you didn't do your job while they were in your care.

A big part in recruiting is helping your son to decide on the individuals (coaching staff) who will be helping them to be better human beings on and off the field. They will discuss every fall, their expectations in that regard and that includes alcohol as well as any other items that may interfere with the purpose in which they are there. Even then, they can't control what each individual does, and the choices they make.
Last edited by TPM
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In the News



A Snapshot of Annual High-Risk College Drinking Consequences

The consequences of excessive and underage drinking affect virtually all college campuses, college communities, and college students, whether they choose to drink or not.

Death: 1,825 college students between the ages of 18 and 24 die from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor vehicle crashes (Hingson et al., 2009).

Injury: 599,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are unintentionally injured under the influence of alcohol (Hingson et al., 2009).

Assault: 696,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are assaulted by another student who has been drinking (Hingson et al., 2009).

Sexual Abuse: 97,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault or date rape (Hingson et al., 2009).

Unsafe ***: 400,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 had unprotected *** and more than 100,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 report having been too intoxicated to know if they consented to having *** (Hingson et al., 2002).

Academic Problems: About 25 percent of college students report academic consequences of their drinking including missing class, falling behind, doing poorly on exams or papers, and receiving lower grades overall (Engs et al., 1996; Presley et al., 1996a, 1996b; Wechsler et al., 2002).


NOTE; As it says in the beginning of this article, this problem affects drinkers AND non drinkers.
quote:
Originally posted by TRhit:
jaggerz are u on a crusade?


No crusade here but the institutions of higher learning should be more diligent with their students. I realize they cannot follow them around nor should they. However, they should NOT bury their heads in the sand and pretend that there is no problem.I worked for many years with young people and know that they need boundaries and guide lines.They even want adults to care but most would not admit it. A lot of this poor decision making began at home when parents were too busy with their own lives to pay attention.
When a parent sends their young person off to college they should expect that the college will do their best to make it safe for all.Obviously, no place will be perfect, but I contend that the colleges can do much better. The students have a big role in this process as well.
So what do you propose jaggerz? Kick kids out? Reintroduce an Amendment to the Constitution to ban alcohol? Freedom is messy and it allows people to screw up their lives, with alcohol and other problems, but you can't regulate everything or you get disrespect for the laws. Again, these students are adults, and I am willing to bet that these kids in college are doing way better than those that are not.
Last edited by Aleebaba
quote:
Originally posted by Aleebaba:
So what do you propose jaggerz? Kick kids out? Reintroduce an Amendment to the Constitution to ban alcohol? Freedom is messy and it allows people to screw up their lives, with alcohol and other problems, but you can't regulate everything or you get disrespect for the laws. Again, these students are adults, and I am willing to bet that these kids in college are doing way better than those that are not.


Well which are they, kids or adults?
You said " Again, these students are adults, and I am willing to bet that these kids in college are doing way better than those that are not."
My point is easy to understand. Pay attention: the colleges are failing at the job of keeping students safe. PERIOD!!
jaggerz - I think you've made your point, and this thread has run it course. Please feel free to send your kids, grandkids, etc to a college that pays particular attention to the issues that are near and dear to you.

I feel I have the right to send my kids (young adults) to a college to make their own judgement about situations and life. My kids have earned their right to make their own choices in college, as they've demonstrated maturity, sound judgement & good decisions at home and in high school. Do I worry sometimes, sure. But, they have yet to disappoint me or my wife. Until they demonstrate otherwise, they have their freedom to make life choices.
Last edited by fenwaysouth
my son played at a majordivision one college----coach put all freshman in a non alcohol dorm for the first 6 months
Interesting thread.

Some thoughts...

The idea of a "dry campus" or "non alcohol" dorm is an absolute joke.

If you are buying that concept please call me because I have an incredible real estate investment opportunity for you. But only for a limited time!

Those distinctions are only to appease mom, dad & donor that the institution is not actively pouring drinks down students throats.

Funny how 9th & 10th graders are "mature" enough to make college commitments but then not mature enough to make their own decisions on what they put in their bodies.

Would I recommend a prospect getting blitzed on a visit? Absolutely not.
Do kids get offered drinks? Absolutely.
Are daddy and mommy's little angel actually drinking when they are away? Absolutely.

My suggestion, sit little Johnny down before he leaves for his visits and have a serious talk with him.

Binge drinking is a serious issue in this country. Especially on college campuses. I hope all of your kids are safe and responsible.

Rich
www.PlayInSchool.com
www.twitter.com/PlayInSchool

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