Does anyone out there have some sample emails that you sent to coaches to keep them informed about your schedule or achievements. I'm a 2016 RHP that did a Perfect Game Showcase in Jan and was named a Rawlings Top Prospect. I really want to let them know about it and also that I will be at Perfect Game Academic Showcase in Fort Myers in May. The same day I got my Perfect Game Grade I received my Mid-Term exam grades and 2nd quarters grades giving me 3.73 GPA. I feel like I want to let them know, but not come off idk,just wrong. Thanks for any advice.

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With grades like that and a good PG grade, I don't think you can go wrong by sending something. Just give them a quick introduction....add a couple links to any video/website that you have and tell them you're interested in their program. You can mention any really good stats...FB in mid-80's....6.8 60 time, etc...but don't fill the email up with stats.   Do your homework....go to the schools website and get the email to the recruiting coordinator...not the head coach...and don't send a "mass email" to multiple coaches at the same time...send each one individually.  Sometimes you need to look in the Athletic Staff Directory...because not every coach lists their email in the roster or coaching staff section.  If it doesn't list a recruiting coordinator, pick the assistant with the most experience.  You've got a lot better chance of him taking the time to look than the HC, especially with the season getting started.  Make a spreadsheet to keep track of ALL responses....even if it's just a camp invite...and follow up with any coaches who ask you for more info....including filing out the website's "recruitiing questionaire" if they ask you to. 

Great question and very good feedback from Buckeye...

 

As noted, send the early intro emails to the D1 recruiting coordinator.  And no mass mailings.  Each one is unique.

 

Typically something like:

 

Dear Coach LASTNAME,

My name is First Last and I'm a 2016 RHP.  I am very interested in playing my college ball for SCHOOL NAME.  (You can also note any personal connections to the school, e.g., my Mom graduated from Acme College in 1990)

I was recently named a Rawlings Top Prospect at the Showcase Name.  web link here.

I'm also a strong student with a 3.7 GPA.

Please include me on your mailing list and let me know about any camps or showcases that you'll be attending.  I look forward to meeting you.

Sincerely,

First Last

2016 RHP

City, State

 

The above is just a basic sample.  You'll want to track each one you send and all responses you receive as noted.

 

You'll also want to periodically update this coach, even if you don't get responses from him. 

 

Lots of good resources on this site, so please poke around and see what may apply to you.

 

Good luck!

That's a great, specific form to use.

 

General rules of thumb:

 

1.  Each individual e-mail should be short.  You've got their attention, now make one point and get out.  Don't write multiple page e-mails. 

 

2.  If you have multiple points to make, send multiple e-mails.  Each one short, maybe 10 days to 2 weeks apart.  This way, you use the topics as your excuse to contact them enough to show strong interest but not so often that you come across as a pest.

 

3.  If you don't currently have multiple points to make, think ahead as to what points you could make.  Examples would include (a) initial expression of interest, noting PG showcase and grade (provide link to PG profile page); (b) provide schedule for your high school team; (c) a few weeks later, provide a mid-season update, with your HS coach's contact information; (d) a few weeks later, inform of what travel team you'll be on, that team's coach's contact info, and the team's summer schedule.

Excellent advice from Midlo.  Short but sweet.  Often enough to demonstrate sincere interest with meaningful content, but not overwhelming.

 

Regarding the pitching coach, our rule of thumb was to include someone other than the recruiting coordinator at a D1 only if there was a personal relationship established.  For example, if that Coach talked to you, knows your name, asked you to follow up, etc.

 

But you should definitely reference that you've been at a given school's camp in your initial email to that school.

 

For example: "I am very interested in playing ball for Acme College.  I attended your prospect camp last month.  My family and I also did an Acme campus tour and orientation session."   This shows a sincere and deeper level of interest than someone who's just sending out feelers to a coach.

Thanks.. This is really helping me... I have thrown for both pitching Coach Meyers at South Carolina and Coach Woodard of VT at Camp in NJ. Coach Woodard spent more than 3 hours with about 10 of us PO. He gave us some great tips. So I was going to include them I think.

I am following this too, and wondering what a good subject line would be?  Son is sending an email to a local university, they know him, have emailed before, last time was a couple months ago when they asked him to send schedule.  Thanks, just blanking on an interesting subject line...

Sons used subject lines that weren't particularly interesting, but that summarized what they were trying to say, e.g.,

 

- "John Doe, 2016 RHP, Named Perfect Game Top Prospect"

- "John Doe, 2016 RHP, Summer Showcase Schedule"

- "John Doe, 2016 RHP, Video Update"

 

Just very concise and specific.

Sorry to bring up an old thread, but found this thread very valuable. We actually used the advice in this thread to send out a round of emails to coaches last night. My son, a 2023, received a good grade at the PG 14u National. On top of that he received a good ranking, both state and national, from PG for the 2023 rankings. I figured why not send out some emails while the getting is good. 

We sent out a few emails last night. We received one response so far.

But thanks for everyone who contributed to this string. It was very helpful. 

ARCEKU21 posted:

Sorry to bring up an old thread, but found this thread very valuable. We actually used the advice in this thread to send out a round of emails to coaches last night. My son, a 2023, received a good grade at the PG 14u National. On top of that he received a good ranking, both state and national, from PG for the 2023 rankings. I figured why not send out some emails while the getting is good. 

We sent out a few emails last night. We received one response so far.

But thanks for everyone who contributed to this string. It was very helpful. 

You’re most likely 2 years too early, unless your son has off the charts measurables before he plays his first freshman HS game.  If not, it’s only going to result in spam emails to attend camps, which he’s too young to attend.

Take a step back and let him focus on High School: grades, social interaction, EC activities, making the HS team, etc.

That makes him a freshman? I think two years too early is stretching it, but maybe a year. Probably does need to make the HS team, and possibly have some varsity time under his belt before you get too serious. We went to son's first showcase after his freshman season.

What it's probably NOT too early to do is drive through some campuses when you're in the neighborhood, get the feel of big school, little school; high academic vs. party central; wide open green spaces vs. urban cluster. Makes no difference about the baseball if your kid hates the atmosphere of the institution.

Every kid is different.  I don't see any problem with attending showcases and sending out some emails summer before freshman year.  People also need to realize that not all schools are alike.  If we waited until my son had varsity experience to push recruiting, it would have been too late.  My son committed to a top 25 P5 after sophomore year, where he rode the bench all year at our school.  It was the same scenario for another kid on our team who just committed to a top 25 P5 after riding the bench his sophomore year. If your son got noticed or a write up as a rising freshman, his measurables were pretty good.  We did the same thing.  One showcase before freshman year, where he got write ups.  Then we did several showcases and started sending emails summer after freshman year and started really getting traction on recruiting.  In my opinion, if he did well, it doesn't hurt to let the coaches see his name a few times. Maybe his name will ring a bell when they see him play.

The suggestion that a Kid wait until they play Varsity to reach out to colleges is ridiculous.  Varsity where?  Some of the kids from this message board would be the greatest ballplayer, as a freshman, in the history of many schools in Wisconsin whereas might not start varsity until an upperclassman in a Baseball hotbed.

Even in my son's conference, in some high schools any functional athlete who could run a 8 flat 60 could start Varsity as a freshman, however at the Top 2 programs you better be a D1 prospect to have a shot at starting.  It is all over the place.

Agree that it’s not a one size fits all process. Between the 14 National Showcase, Future Stars Series, and the USA NTIS, we ran into a bunch of 2023’s who are already committed. Not just the top kids to P5 schools, but the next tier schools as well. My son’s showcase team has 3 players who already committed with several others with offers already. In talking with some of these parents the theme was the same, don’t sit back and wait for them to come to you. Put your name in front of them sooner than later so that you get on their radar. Even if a school hasn’t started recruiting your class yet they will possibly keep a list of names to look at when they do. 

Any parent that is letting their 2023 commit to a mid-major D1 or below is not very well informed. If the kid is good enough as a frosh to garner a D1 commitment, why commit that early to a program that isn’t P5? It all sounds a little suspect to me, don’t believe everything people tell you regarding offer and commitments, because believe it or not, people stretch the truth.

Also, most non-P5 wait to see who develops before making an offer. I am just really skeptical of parents who say these things.

I agree about committing that early to a non P5 school that early, but these players have their commitments listed in their PG profiles as well. I don’t think there would be any benefit to doing that if it wasn’t true. My thought is that it would hinder them and detract P5 schools if they saw that. These schools included Florida Int’l, Louisiana Lafayette, Bethune-Cookman, San Diego State, Alabama State. 

At the same time, there are handful of kids that we ran into that are committed to P5 schools like Vandy, Alabama, Miami, Florida State, Mississippi State and a few more.

How are we defining "commit?"  Verbal or an actual written contract?  Grads and seeing actual transcripts and ACT or SAT scores seem to be a big deal with D1's, how does a kid with neither get signed to a D1 program?  Are grades and test scores not as important as most have suggested?

2022 grad posted:

How are we defining "commit?"  Verbal or an actual written contract?  Grads and seeing actual transcripts and ACT or SAT scores seem to be a big deal with D1's, how does a kid with neither get signed to a D1 program?  Are grades and test scores not as important as most have suggested?

Until Senior year in November, all commits are verbal. In terms of scores, It’s all relative. If your kid is a complete stud and it’s not a HA D1, the scores matter very little. If your kid is really good and wants to go to Stanford, they matter much more, if your kid wants to go to a HA D3 or an IVY,  scores matter a LOT.

2022 grad posted:

How are we defining "commit?"  Verbal or an actual written contract?  Grads and seeing actual transcripts and ACT or SAT scores seem to be a big deal with D1's, how does a kid with neither get signed to a D1 program?  Are grades and test scores not as important as most have suggested?

I've never had a D1 ask for my sons' ACT or SAT scores or GPA officially until after the offer was made and between my two lefties we had every ACC, SEC, and the top of the Big 12.  They asked how grades were and test scores but never asked for it.  The same way I talk about showcasing early, which I am a fan of if you have something to showcase which for a young player is projectability, you need to take the tests early so that you have some clue.  I had a friend's son who took it as an 8th grader and made 25 so he had something to tell coaches.  Coaches will normally ask how are your grades and then move on.  Now HA is a different subject.  But we never even blinked at the HA stuff. 

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