Exit velocity

Lpigs25 posted:

Really I’ve usually heard that it’s 5 feet per 1mph, just didn’t know if it was truly realistic. 

closer to 4. Think about it. Stanton hit a home run with 112 mph exit velocity. It didn't go 560 feet. it went 434 I believe, so fairly close to 4 mph given angle and loft of homerun

Dadof3 posted:

Like midatlantic dad said, lots of variables.  It appears as though the chart above is probably taking into account a wood bat.  BBCOR the velocity would be less, and non-bbcor/wood, even less.

BBCOR and woodbats perform the same as far as exit velocity. The BBCOR material was created to be a wood bat with a larger sweet spot.

TheJR30 posted:
Dadof3 posted:

Like midatlantic dad said, lots of variables.  It appears as though the chart above is probably taking into account a wood bat.  BBCOR the velocity would be less, and non-bbcor/wood, even less.

BBCOR and woodbats perform the same as far as exit velocity. The BBCOR material was created to be a wood bat with a larger sweet spot.

Actually, the bat isn't a factor in the trajectory calculator at all. It doesn't matter if you hit the ball with a drop-10 or a 36 oz maple... if the ball left the bat at 95 mph with a LA of 25 degrees, it's going to travel 351'. Other significant factors are headwind/tailwind, backspin, temperature and humidity.

Hate to disagree with you but bat composition does make a difference:

https://www.elitediamondperfor...e-of-ball-exit-speed

 

Another reason I know.  My son just hit the ball 350', he is 13.  He isn't doesn't have an exit velocity of 95+ - I guess I should say composition + COR.  so a bbcor will outperform wood.  ussa bats will outperform both.

 

Dadof3 posted:

Hate to disagree with you but bat composition does make a difference:

Your article is about all the factors involved that can impact the exit velocity (bat weigh, bat speed, bat construction). The trajectory calculator doesn't care about how the exit velocity was achieved, it's simply correlating EV, LA, and distance (after contact). Try it out for yourself. Below is the same chart when I give the batted ball a 7 mph tailwind. Maybe your son had a 7 mph tailwind and a 90 mph EV?

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Dadof3 posted:

Hate to disagree with you but bat composition does make a difference:

https://www.elitediamondperfor...e-of-ball-exit-speed

 

Another reason I know.  My son just hit the ball 350', he is 13.  He isn't doesn't have an exit velocity of 95+ - I guess I should say composition + COR.  so a bbcor will outperform wood.  ussa bats will outperform both.

 

have tested this "phenomenon". To be exact, a wooden exit velocity may be one (1) mph slower than a bbcor. The entire idea behind BBCOR was to reduce exit speed to that of a wood bat for safety. USSSA bats will outperform both because the composition is entirely different.

edit: 

Launch angle plays a big factor in velocity. A 350 foot frozen rope will have a much higher exit velocity than a moonshot/ Roy Hobbs type of hit. The rest MidAtlanticdad explained.

MidAtlanticDad posted:
Dadof3 posted:

Hate to disagree with you but bat composition does make a difference:

Your article is about all the factors involved that can impact the exit velocity (bat weigh, bat speed, bat construction). The trajectory calculator doesn't care about how the exit velocity was achieved, it's simply correlating EV, LA, and distance (after contact). Try it out for yourself. Below is the same chart when I give the batted ball a 7 mph tailwind. Maybe your son had a 7 mph tailwind and a 90 mph EV?

Good point, that is a definite possibility

Dadof3 posted:
MidAtlanticDad posted:
Dadof3 posted:

Hate to disagree with you but bat composition does make a difference:

Your article is about all the factors involved that can impact the exit velocity (bat weigh, bat speed, bat construction). The trajectory calculator doesn't care about how the exit velocity was achieved, it's simply correlating EV, LA, and distance (after contact). Try it out for yourself. Below is the same chart when I give the batted ball a 7 mph tailwind. Maybe your son had a 7 mph tailwind and a 90 mph EV?

Good point, that is a definite possibility

I assume this chart is for play at sea level?  Altitude, even 1000' (doesn't have to be in the mountains). will make a difference for sure.

Smitty28 posted:
Dadof3 posted:
MidAtlanticDad posted:
Dadof3 posted:

Hate to disagree with you but bat composition does make a difference:

Your article is about all the factors involved that can impact the exit velocity (bat weigh, bat speed, bat construction). The trajectory calculator doesn't care about how the exit velocity was achieved, it's simply correlating EV, LA, and distance (after contact). Try it out for yourself. Below is the same chart when I give the batted ball a 7 mph tailwind. Maybe your son had a 7 mph tailwind and a 90 mph EV?

Good point, that is a definite possibility

I assume this chart is for play at sea level?  Altitude, even 1000' (doesn't have to be in the mountains). will make a difference for sure.

Correct. A link to the spreadsheet is above. (1,000' of elevation adds 4' to the 353 number in that chart.)

Have to agree with previous post that the figures on that chart do NOT MATTER in terms of bat used!  You can try to sway me on that point, but you have to explain to me how a BPF 1.15 bat can somehow impart properties to a batted ball whereby that ball will travel farther than the laws of physics will allow!   I believe bat speed is being confused with EV.  YES, for a giving bat speed, the EV will be significantly higher for the BPF 1.15 bat than it would be for wood or BBCOR.  BUT, the Exit Velocity, or speed of the ball off the bat coupled with launch angle is largely what determines how far the ball will travel. It comes down to math and physics.

DALEX posted:

Have to agree with previous post that the figures on that chart do NOT MATTER in terms of bat used!  You can try to sway me on that point, but you have to explain to me how a BPF 1.15 bat can somehow impart properties to a batted ball whereby that ball will travel farther than the laws of physics will allow!   I believe bat speed is being confused with EV.  YES, for a giving bat speed, the EV will be significantly higher for the BPF 1.15 bat than it would be for wood or BBCOR.  BUT, the Exit Velocity, or speed of the ball off the bat coupled with launch angle is largely what determines how far the ball will travel. It comes down to math and physics.

USSSA BPF 1.15 bats do not defy physics, the type of composition coupled with a lighter swing weight is what causes greater EV. Bat speed commonly confused with exit velocity, but the two are very similar. Exit velocity is correlated with bat head velocity. I was not disagreeing with the chart, I was attempting to explain that bbcor and wood bats exhibit similar exit velocities.

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