Growth Hormone Deficiency

Just found out that my youngest may have a Growth Hormone Deficiency.

We have been under the assumption that our son was just a late bloomer, however after some medical testing it appears he may have a Growth Hormone Deficiency. He has always been one of if not the smallest player of every team he has been on, however he has been one of the better players. His size has not held him back. He is getting to the age where almost all the other players are starting their growth spurts except for him. He is also one of the smallest in his class. He has had the X-ray of his wrist to show the growth plates and is around 3 years behind on his growth. He has undergone additional testing with a pediatric endocrinologist. He has completed the second round of testing and has now been scheduled for an MRI of his pituitary gland. There has been discussion initiated by his doctor regarding him receiving HGH injections.

My question is has anyone on here gone through this type of situation or treatment, or know of someone? If you prefer to respond via PM please do.  I know it is early and it may not matter in the long run. But, he is an externally hard working kid that wants to play college ball with a dream of pro ball (like most players). Will the diagnoses or use of treatment (HGH) hinder his ability to reach his goals (disqualify him)? It is my understanding, he may require the treatment until several years after he has stopped growing.

 If it hinders his baseball goals or not, and after a second option from another physician. We will likely start the treatment if it is required, due to the long-term health advantages of the treatment. We would just like to know if it will hinder his athletic goals.

 Thank you for any information you can provide.

 

Original Post

Before puberty it’s not uncommon for kids to be developmentally plus or minus three years of their chronological age. My daughter was 5’ at twelve and 5’10” at fourteen. My son was 5’4” at fourteen. He grew to be 6’2”.

RJM I agree.

Guess I need to be more clear. My son has already done the IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 blood test and the GH stimulation test. He has failed both tests. The next step is the MRI of the pituitary gland to see if there are any visual issues (hoping there is not).  The height was one of the first signs that there may have been an issue. The x-ray was another sign there was an issue.  We have been seeing an endocrinologist for around 2 years.

Future height is only one concern with GHD as well as decreased bone density, increased cardiovascular risk factors, etc. This is why, even if there is impact to his future athletics, we will still do the treatment if needed for the long term health. 

We just don't know if it will affect his future athletics by using the treatment. 

I tried to do some research on the NCAA site, however a lot of it didn't make since. 

Ones again thank you to everyone for the assistance. 

Assuming your son is a 2025, as indicated in your name, that puts him in the 6th grade. The NCAA and his college eligibility is not something you should be worrying about right now. Are you not going to do what is best for him health wise just so he can maybe get a scholarship 7 years from now? Take care of his health, and if it is that important call the NCAA. 

 

Like I have said in 2 posts now, if the doctor says he needs it, he will get it. It is more important for him to be healthy then for him to play college ball.

I am just looking for insight into possible issues with the NCAA, and if anyone has gone through this before. I have already recieved a PM with information from someone in the same situation. So this post has worked. 

Still looking for info on the NCAA waiver process. 

 

People acting like they wouldn’t question future scenarios are crazy. Every time you make a major decision for your child, you question yourself and look at all possible future outcomes. It’s being a parent and worrying. Comes with the job. Good luck to you and I hope everything works out well.

baseballhs posted:

People acting like they wouldn’t question future scenarios are crazy. Every time you make a major decision for your child, you question yourself and look at all possible future outcomes. It’s being a parent and worrying. Comes with the job. Good luck to you and I hope everything works out well.

 Who are these people?

The people saying it is crazy to even ask if it would ruin his chances due to NCAA. Of course a parent is going to do what’s best but that doesn’t mean you don’t ask about future consequences.  I think parents making a big decision for their child run though everything in their head.

baseballhs posted:

The people saying it is crazy to even ask if it would ruin his chances due to NCAA. Of course a parent is going to do what’s best but that doesn’t mean you don’t ask about future consequences.  I think parents making a big decision for their child run though everything in their head.

Provided the physician diagnoses the issue and gets the dosage correct, why would having the same level of hormones as every other kid ruin the chances of playing college baseball?

My son wrestled with a young man who had the same issue. In middle school he started to take growth hormones. He never intended to wrestle in college. However they did verify with the state body that it would no affect on his eligibility in HS. I cannot say what the NCAA would rule.  

Thank you all for your input. I have recived a number of PMs that have answered my questions. 

If anyone happens to search this type of issue in the future, feel free to contact me, via PM. I will be able to pass on the information I have learned from here, and other information sources. 

#2_2025 posted:

Thank you all for your input. I have recived a number of PMs that have answered my questions. 

If anyone happens to search this type of issue in the future, feel free to contact me, via PM. I will be able to pass on the information I have learned from here, and other information sources. 

Best wishes to you guys on the best possible outcome. 

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