IMHO

Having a 2012, I suggest not getting too caught up on these dates unless you have a player who is so strong that they have received regional or state wide attention by virtue of a sophomore year all conference/all division/all state nod. These guys should get in front of pro scouts for assessments and to get on their radar. And maybe attend a PG Showcase to get on the web radar.

Anyone else needs to use the advice on these pages in terms of spending their money wisely by picking maybe an introductory showcase and attending a couple college camps in their rising junior summer, and focusing their primary bucks and efforts in their rising senior summer via direct school contacts, college camps, a couple showcases, and a good travel team who will get them to key showcase tournaments.

As far as the September 1 email contacts, and July 1 coaches call, I think worrying about those is a waste of time. If they happen they happen. If they don't, it doesn't really change what you should be doing.
quote:
Originally posted by RedSoxFan21:
IMHO

Having a 2012, I suggest not getting too caught up on these dates unless you have a player who is so strong that they have received regional or state wide attention by virtue of a sophomore year all conference/all division/all state nod. These guys should get in front of pro scouts for assessments and to get on their radar. And maybe attend a PG Showcase to get on the web radar.

Anyone else needs to use the advice on these pages in terms of spending their money wisely by picking maybe an introductory showcase and attending a couple college camps in their rising junior summer, and focusing their primary bucks and efforts in their rising senior summer via direct school contacts, college camps, a couple showcases, and a good travel team who will get them to key showcase tournaments.

As far as the September 1 email contacts, and July 1 coaches call, I think worrying about those is a waste of time. If they happen they happen. If they don't, it doesn't really change what you should be doing.


A coach can not contact you by email before sep 1? is that the rule? Thanks in advance
Any advice for an incoming sophomore pitcher 6'3 215# throwing 82 to 86mph. Played at perfect game EC but was injured and not at his best velocity wise topped out at 83mph. Will be out this fall rehabing. He did get interest from a white sox scout last fall.

Very interested in hearing from more experienced parents.
quote:
Originally posted by throw'n bb's:
Any advice for an incoming sophomore pitcher 6'3 215# throwing 82 to 86mph. Played at perfect game EC but was injured and not at his best velocity wise topped out at 83mph. Will be out this fall rehabing. He did get interest from a white sox scout last fall.

Very interested in hearing from more experienced parents.


If I am understanding the same as smalltownmom, you had your son pitch when hurt so I really have no advice to share other than if you did (have him pitch hurt) that was really not smart.
Throwbb: Don’t worry about this fall, and wait until he is healthy he has lots of time. A RHP is not going to get much interest regardless of size until he hits 88. This is the magic number for D1’s. My son was 6’4” 185 as was very projectable and no one cared when he was at 84-86. Once he hit 88 the phone started ringing. Because of scholly and roster limits programs do not have room for too many projects.
quote:
no one cared when he was at 84-86. Once he hit 88 the phone started ringing. Because of scholly and roster limits programs do not have room for too many projects.


Would 84-86 raise eyes at a DII school though?
hmmm.. I know that's the general rule, but I know a RHP 84-86 that has "interest" from a couple of D1s. I was surprised. I guess there are random exceptions for some reason.
He did not tell anyone he was hurt until after the tournament. We shut him down as soon as we new.

So an incoming Soph should be at 88 to get noticed?

I have only seen one do that all season and at EC.
I do understand how he would not tell anyone until after the tournament. I think it's sometimes the mentality that you don't want to let your team down. He will probably let you guys know a lot quicker now if things don't feel right. I think recruiters are looking at solid mechanics as well as velocity at that age. If he's throwing 86 easily I'm sure schools are aware. There are definitely kids that throw 88 as sophomres, even a little higher. But a sophomore who throws 84-86 with good mechanics, especially with your son's size, is in very good shape. Like others have said, just concentrate on getting healthy right now. The rest will come.
quote:
Originally posted by LHPMom2012:
Thanks for the input, guys. I didn't think the schools were tracking these emails all that closely because in another thread on the Maryland board, "Bear" got the same email my son got, and he's a little old to be a 2012 grad, or even 2011. When he posted that, I thought, "This whole 'You're one of the top prospects in the area' must be a phrase that's tossed around lightly."

And those questionnaires are lengthy. The poster whose son has already filled them out and sent them back... good for him!


It is hard to make the distinction with some of the emails. Clearly some are nothing more than attempts to get your kid to go to the schools camp. If you think they are possibly interested in your son, you are more likely to pay the expense to send them there. That happened with my son several times where he filled out the questioner that was sent, then shortly afterward he was sent an invitation to attend one of the upcoming camps. When I called to speak with the coach to see if there was genuine interest, the coach had never even heard of my son, much less have seen him play. I found out later that is program is well known for making parents believe it is a personal invitation when in reality it is a cattle call.
Do they sometimes recruit from their camps? Sure, because sooner or later if you cast a wide enough net, you are bound to catch a few fish.

I do not want to sound cynical, but as a parent I've experienced the good and the bad in the recruitment game.
My advice is to have your son respond to every inquiry just because it is considered proper manners, and there might be a genuine interest in him. For the long questioners, get a software program that fills out most of the standard info with one click, thereby reducing some of the time and effort. However have him keep a record of how the contact was initiated. That way you can backtrack later to see if it is genuine interest in him as a potential recruit, or just a means of funding the baseball program through camps.
I hope that you sat down with your son and explained how important it is to tell someone when something doesn't feel right. I often feel this happens when young players feel pressured to please others (as they don't want to let them down), been there done that so this advice comes from experience.

Never ever show up for a showcase or tournament unless you are in perfect health and at your best, players don't realize how much this can work against you. This is the best way to lose attention then you have to work harder at getting it back (attention).

BOF offers good advice, your son has plenty of time, just get better and work hard at regaining that veocity. FWIW, my son didn't hit 90 until fall of junior year, and that opened lots of doors, if he had committed earlier he may have been missing out on great opportunities.

Coaches use their camps to be able to meet and get to know the prospects they are very much interested in.

I have said it once and will say it again, there's a lot of guesswork that goes into this, but reality is that you will KNOW when someone is hot on your case. Trying to read too much into every step along the way is sometimes not necessary, those of us that have been through it can tell you that YOU and YOUR SON will KNOW.
As a Junior, it is time to get rocking and rolling. Before you blink it will be senior year and 3/4 of the scholarships/ roster spots are already "taken".

I was very persistent when I was trying to get recruited a few years back. I went to 5-6 showcases and made sure to email and call coaches whenever I thought they might be in the area. I knew I had to impress them on the field, but I also knew I had an advantage if the coaches remembered me when they were watching me play.

Finding a school is a lot like a finding a girl. There are lots out there, all offering something different and at times it can seem like a daunting task. What always calmed me at night though was I knew I only needed one. I didn't need 7 scholarship offers. I needed one.

It is an important fact to remember b/c you don't need to be the kid getting recruited by every SEC school. Real, genuine interest from a few northern schools where you can play and get accepted is enough.

Ken Jacobi

Author of “Going with the Pitch: Adjusting to Baseball, School, and Life as a Division I College Athlete"
Hello Tom,

As the author of this book, I do not think it is fair to simply write a one line critique saying the book has a cynical slant with nothing supporting the statement. There is much more going on within the pages to state such a black and white analysis of it. I 100% respect your opinion, as you are more entitled to it, but the purpose of this book was to share with people a very common story that occurs at colleges throughout the country every year. For every person who says this is too cynical or bitter, I can offer 10 emails from players, parents, and coaches who have emailed me sharing their "Going with the Pitch" story. At times this book is "cynical" but there is a direct purpose to that.

We are all big fish in small ponds when we enter the collegiate level and it is very difficult for many student-athletes to adjust and find success at the next level. I thought all too many times that college baseball was glorified ( granted as it should be at times ) without addressing all of the business, politics, and trials and tribulations that go with it.

Do I think at times I was "mistreated" at school? Perhaps. But I have never been bitter, or as you say cynical, to my experience. I know I am better and more mature because of it and am thankful it gave me the avenue to share my story.

If I have any regrets about my time at college it is that I was only becoming the player I knew I could be when my time was up. That is partly my fault, partly my supporting staff. I do think that if I had known some of the lessons in which I discussion the book AND was handled in a different manner the results could have played out differently...but again, I was never going to be a Major Leaguer so ironically I am actually grateful for the experience I went through.


With all that being said, I would actually love to start/host a forum ( even maybe chat session we can "advertise" ) where we can discuss these types of things. I think a lot of people would be interested in the discussion and would allow a very open forum for discussion. Would you be interested in working together on doing something like this?

Regards,

Ken J

Author of “Going with the Pitch: Adjusting to Baseball, School, and Life as a Division I College Athlete"
Last edited by GoingwiththePitch
Ken,
I don't know about anyone else but I give you credit for writing a book about your experience.

It's good to hear opinions of others that have been through the recruiting process as well as the college baseball experience, that's how we learn. I would bet that your "cynical view" probably is very common but often not discussed.

Why don't you get in touch with JH or CD regarding HSBBW Radio, I think that it would make for a good interview.

JMO.
Last edited by TPM
tpm what you and the poster do not know is that perhaps, just perhaps,I know quite a bit about the background here
quote:
Originally posted by TRhit:
tpm what you and the poster do not know is that perhaps, just perhaps,I know quite a bit about the background here


That's a bit cryptic, TR. You represented your original comment to be about the book, not the background or the author.

Taken on the face of it, I would think the vast majority of D1 players would be rather cynical. They come from being the best in their town to being among a bunch of guys who were the best in their town, or who were good at marketing themselves, or probably both. Now that they are among 'their own' not everyone can get the playing time they once had, and they have lost the marketing edge they may have had before arriving in the coach's new world. And when they get home they probably get heralded with comments like "what's wrong with that coach, why aren't you playing?".

The result of someone not schooled extremely well on dealing with adversity will result in a great deal of cynicism. Maybe that comes out in this book and maybe, just maybe, that is how quite a few D1 players will end up feeling and should be forewarned.
quote:
Originally posted by RedSoxFan21:
quote:
Originally posted by TRhit:
tpm what you and the poster do not know is that perhaps, just perhaps,I know quite a bit about the background here


That's a bit cryptic, TR. You represented your original comment to be about the book, not the background or the author.


Correct.

Don't get me started....
quote:
Originally posted by TRhit:
tpm--it all relates---trust --me you do not know the half of it


TR,
People know a lot of "stuff" about other people, coming here to make a point knowing about the "stuff" (or half of it) you know about an individual doesn't fit into the discussion, does it?

If you want to critique the book, fine, not sure how the other stuff is relevant.

FWIW, my son had a great college experience, but I could as a parent find some cynacism (?) in the process as well as the system (D1 and NCAA) as I am sure most could (players, parents AND coaches).
Hello TPM & company,

I would love to set something up on HSBBW Radio. I think it is a great idea for everyone to hear from a different perspective and be able to chime in. We all have different experiences and I think a forum, such as this website, is a great thing because it allows people to share these experiences and hopefully learn from them.

Do you have the contact info for JH or CD?


________

I am not sure what this "other half is" that TRHit is trying to get into but again I think an open forum is an excellent idea for everyone to come together and discuss both the good and "cynical" parts of college baseball. I have always tried to be honest and truthful and do respect others' opinions. It is for this reason I feel a chat session/ radio interview would go a long way. There are always 2 sides to every story and think the opportunity to share my side truly will benefit a lot of high-school / college baseball players.

Ken J - KJacobi1hw@gmail.com 203-809-3292

Author of “Going with the Pitch: Adjusting to Baseball, School, and Life as a Division I College Athlete"
Ken- We can certainly work something out. I'll talk to CD this afternoon and get in touch with you to get the ball rolling. Excellent idea.

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