Son is a 2021 RHP, 5’11 182 lb, with a repertoire of four pitches that he can throw for strike (FB, CV, Change-up and slider). His fastball just hit 84 mph. His GPA is a solid 4.24, and he scored 1310 in the SAT the first time he took it (he is not totally satisfied with that score and is planing in taking it again).  Son wants to study Engineering or applied Math. He also wants to play baseball either in California or Florida. Son is open to play in any division as long as he gets the opportunity to pitch and contribute to his team. My question is how do we know he is a fit for any school? Academically, he is aiming at schools such as Cal Poly or Cal Tech... How do we know they need a pitcher with his characteristics? In order words, how do we know that he will be given the opportunity to play and succeed academically?  Your thoughts, advise?

Original Post

He's close to where he needs to be academically for Cal Poly (though keep in mind that CA State schools use unweighted GPA) but I don't think that he's a match there baseball-wise unless he brings the velo up.  For Caltech he needs to bring the SAT up and the GPA too, if he can, but I bet the baseball coach would love to have him.

To his list of  CA Engineering -Stem schools he should add Harvey Mudd in D3 and, if his velo trends up, the UC system in D1.

IMHO.

Welcome to the site.  You came to the right place.  First, know that you can search topics here and find a ton of information that way as well as posting specific questions.  Just from a baseball standpoint, Cal Poly and Cal Tech are worlds apart.  Cal Poly is a frequently ranked D1 program that is able to bring in top recruits.  If your son is good enough to play there, he will know very soon if not already.  Touching 84 wont' do it.  Cal Tech is a D3 program who is historically weak in baseball (but improving!) and would be a much easier target with regards to making the roster and getting a chance to contribute.  

Engineering is a great field of study but one that will instantly reduce the number of college options where it will be feasible to play baseball.  Again, there are a ton of threads you can search here on that topic.  There are options but they are relatively limited when you look at how realistic it is to commit to playing college baseball and also meet the requirements of engineering programs simultaneously.  Also know that California and Florida are two baseball hotbeds where the supply of really good baseball players far exceeds the demand... more so than in any other states, I believe.  Embry Riddle may be one to look at in Florida.  

Your son will need a solid recruiting plan for baseball along with a smart plan for college selection.  How far along is he in putting that together?  Does he play with a travel organization that will get him in front of the right schools?  Is he getting proper instruction to maximize his abilities?  To what extent has he been exposed to pitching against rosters of college-ready hitters?  How has he done in that environment?  These are just a few starter questions.  From there, many here can offer more specific advice.

Profile says you're in CO... School of Mines is one that comes up often as a good choice.  There was a recent thread that discussed specific schools good for engineering majors but I can't find in a search.  Can someone else pull that link?

PS - your profile is a but confusing... stated like you are the player but your post says you are the dad ??  No big deal either way but people like to know so they can advise accordingly.

The larger warm weather states have more prospects trying to play baseball in state than there are available roster spots. Players are more likely to leave these states looking for baseball opportunity than players coming in. The players who do come in from outside states usually are successful due to being top recruits. At Cal Poly it would mean being a potential baseball draft prospect. At Cal Tech it would mean being a top rocket scientist (JPL) prospect.

It’s not uncommon for baseball coaches to discourage majoring in engineering or other majors with afternoon labs and/or intensive homework. Unranked HA college programs tend to be more patient with engineering student. Even without engineering any college athlete taking academics very seriously will find baseball and academics are both full time jobs. Both of my kids were non engineering baseball/softball playing STEM majors. They didn’t have a lot of free time. 

Venezuelan dude in CO posted:

Son is a 2021 RHP, 5’11 182 lb, with a repertoire of four pitches that he can throw for strike (FB, CV, Change-up and slider). His fastball just hit 84 mph. His GPA is a solid 4.24, and he scored 1310 in the SAT the first time he took it (he is not totally satisfied with that score and is planing in taking it again).  Son wants to study Engineering or applied Math. He also wants to play baseball either in California or Florida. Son is open to play in any division as long as he gets the opportunity to pitch and contribute to his team. My question is how do we know he is a fit for any school? Academically, he is aiming at schools such as Cal Poly or Cal Tech... How do we know they need a pitcher with his characteristics? In order words, how do we know that he will be given the opportunity to play and succeed academically?  Your thoughts, advise?

1) Go to college navigator to see their academic metrics for admission.  Is he high, low or in the middle?

2) Research, visit and tour the schools for academic fit.  Have your son Introduce himself to the coaches.  Attend a baseball camp/academic showcase to introduce yourself to the coaches.   Ask questions about their recruitment process.   Ask questions about their program's success with engineering majors and baseball players.

3) Watch some of their games in person or over the internet.  Evaluate if this is a good athletic fit.

4) Network with as many people as possible about the school's engineering & baseball program.

5) Rinse and repeat with many schools so you have a context of where your son fits.

Good luck!

Look into The University of Texas at Dallas.  Great engineering program that partners well with local industry. Modern campus in good north Dallas suburb. Also has very competitive D3 baseball program (with great facilities) and, unlike most D3s in Texas, it’s a public school. They are a research institute and have a large endowment. For some reason this school continues to fly under the radar - and it shouldn’t. 

As JCG wrote his pitching velo would definitely put him in the mix athletically at Caltech.  Academically, last year anyway, Caltech wanted SATs north of 1400 (ACT 33 or higher), with 3.9 unweighted GPA, AP Calc AB (preferably BC), AP Physics C, AP Chem, etc.,  AND two subject SATs with scores over 700.  

Also, as mentioned above supply exceeds demand, esp in California/west coast.  You may already know this but there are only two D3 conferences (18 teams) on the west coast and only one conference in California-9 teams (a third of those recruit nationally, so your son might be a good fit at those schools). There are SEVEN conferences that have teams in Massachusetts, alone.  The numbers game is ridiculous in the west.

Something to consider: 3/2 programs that allow kids to do their first three years at LACs, and then 2 years of engineering courses at places like USC, Columbia, Wash U, etc.  That might be a good option for your son.

http://collegelists.pbworks.co...50/3-2%20Engineering

As of now, your 2021 needs to be more flexible as to where he will consider going to school. FL and CA is filled with great ballplayers.

As of now, his BB stats are those of a D3 RHP at best, unless he has some great action on his ball.

Caltech is a huge reach for any prospective student...they are the best, of the best, of the best, and has a tiny class. Most students there will have SAT's in the 1500's, and be extraordinary and talented students.  

   If you do a search on here you will find the father of a Caltech student. He will have the best idea of any of us as to what is required to get in, and what the workload is actually like.

Good advice on CP and C Tech.

If you broaden your search, your son would start at the United States Merchant Marine academy. Gets an engineering degree, 100% extremely high paying employment, stars on the baseball team. Downside: it's not evenly M/F and has the discipline of a service academy. The alum form a formidable network and there is zero cost.

But the entrance process needs to be started.

Goosegg posted:

If you broaden your search, your son would start at the United States Merchant Marine academy. Gets an engineering degree, 100% extremely high paying employment, stars on the baseball team. Downside: it's not evenly M/F and has the discipline of a service academy. The alum form a formidable network and there is zero cost.

Very minor point, but the USMMA has a mandatory "sea year" that takes precedence over athletics, and most midshipmen will miss one season of baseball while at sea.

adbono posted:

Look into The University of Texas at Dallas.  Great engineering program that partners well with local industry. Modern campus in good north Dallas suburb. Also has very competitive D3 baseball program (with great facilities) and, unlike most D3s in Texas, it’s a public school. They are a research institute and have a large endowment. For some reason this school continues to fly under the radar - and it shouldn’t. 

If he's going to expand the search to Texas (which is a good idea) then he should add Trinity to the mix.

WestCoastPapa posted:

Point Loma: With that GPA and SAT you get $15K in academic money right off the bat. Right on the ocean, Hawaii trip every other year.... 

Yeah, but then the kid would have to play on this field.  And ... I mean ... that's just cruel!!

Carroll B. Land Stadium

JCG posted:

He's close to where he needs to be academically for Cal Poly (though keep in mind that CA State schools use unweighted GPA) but I don't think that he's a match there baseball-wise unless he brings the velo up.  For Caltech he needs to bring the SAT up and the GPA too, if he can, but I bet the baseball coach would love to have him.

To his list of  CA Engineering -Stem schools he should add Harvey Mudd in D3 and, if his velo trends up, the UC system in D1.

IMHO.

Thanks, JCG, for your message.

Son's velo is trending up. He got serious about training and lifting during this fall; trained really hard for 10 weeks without any distractions ---girls, football, percussion, etc.  and his velo went from 78-79 to 82-84.  We attended a Pitching camp/showcase last weekend and he overheard a conversation in which an assistant coach said to the head coach that his velo was between 83-85; that still needs to be confirmed by the rapsodo report .  So, yes, he is trending up.  He took the SAT at the beginning of his Sophomore year with no preparation (scored 1310); took it again this year with some more preparation, therefore we are optimistic. Son is willing to take the SAT as many times necessary until he scores 1500. In regards to the GPA,  he has straight A's, so I'm guessing he has a 4.0 unweighted.  

Definitely will add Mudd Scrips to the list along with Cal Poly Pomona, Cal Tech and UC Davis.  

Once again, thanks!

Venezuelan dad in CO

Goosegg posted:

Good advice on CP and C Tech.

If you broaden your search, your son would start at the United States Merchant Marine academy. Gets an engineering degree, 100% extremely high paying employment, stars on the baseball team. Downside: it's not evenly M/F and has the discipline of a service academy. The alum form a formidable network and there is zero cost.

But the entrance process needs to be started.

Doesn't that mean you have to sign up for military for a certain period?

cabbagedad posted:

Welcome to the site.  You came to the right place.  First, know that you can search topics here and find a ton of information that way as well as posting specific questions.  Just from a baseball standpoint, Cal Poly and Cal Tech are worlds apart.  Cal Poly is a frequently ranked D1 program that is able to bring in top recruits.  If your son is good enough to play there, he will know very soon if not already.  Touching 84 wont' do it.  Cal Tech is a D3 program who is historically weak in baseball (but improving!) and would be a much easier target with regards to making the roster and getting a chance to contribute.  

Engineering is a great field of study but one that will instantly reduce the number of college options where it will be feasible to play baseball.  Again, there are a ton of threads you can search here on that topic.  There are options but they are relatively limited when you look at how realistic it is to commit to playing college baseball and also meet the requirements of engineering programs simultaneously.  Also know that California and Florida are two baseball hotbeds where the supply of really good baseball players far exceeds the demand... more so than in any other states, I believe.  Embry Riddle may be one to look at in Florida.  

Your son will need a solid recruiting plan for baseball along with a smart plan for college selection.  How far along is he in putting that together?  Does he play with a travel organization that will get him in front of the right schools?  Is he getting proper instruction to maximize his abilities?  To what extent has he been exposed to pitching against rosters of college-ready hitters?  How has he done in that environment?  These are just a few starter questions.  From there, many here can offer more specific advice.

Profile says you're in CO... School of Mines is one that comes up often as a good choice.  There was a recent thread that discussed specific schools good for engineering majors but I can't find in a search.  Can someone else pull that link?

PS - your profile is a but confusing... stated like you are the player but your post says you are the dad ??  No big deal either way but people like to know so they can advise accordingly.

Cabbagedad, thanks for your message.

Son started the profile, but I posted the question.  We already fixed the profile because I will be using it more often.

We were thinking more in Cal Poly Pomona, I understand that is a Div II school.  Son went to a showcase at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and came back disappointed.  He wants a more balanced experience.  Colorado School of Mines is, definitely, an option.  Mines is a Div II school with a focus on STEM and Engineering, so it is at the top of our list ---"our" meaning mom and myself  

In regards to the recruiting plan... Uh Oh, you got me, I have not done my homework well.  I mean, we have been attending showcase camps in Colorado; son attended one of the Stanford University Summer Camps, but I have to admit that those camps have not put my son in front of the "right" schools.  Also, for the past two summers we have been avoiding travel organizations and played Legion Ball instead. Probably that's the result of baseball being an afterthought and devoting  equal time to other extracurricular activities (Football, Percussion, Robotics and so forth).  On the other hand, playing travel baseball is really pricey, and I still have the impression that they won't put my son in front of the "right" schools. Anyways, this year we committed to a travel organization, and I think they have contacts with mid-west and southeast schools, lets see how it goes.  

Son will be playing Varsity this coming year, our league has a lot of college-ready hitters in Boulder, Fort Collins and South Denver Metro, so this is something that is yet to be seen.  However, in the showcases he is been part of, he had performed fairly well.  For instance, last summer at the Stanford Camp he pitched a two run, three hits, eight innings game.  He was really lucky that his squad had no pitchers left for that scrimmage and the coach in charge allowed him to go the entire route. 

Here in Colorado is really hard to have the proper instruction, I mean, is really hard to separate the wheat from the chaff.   We have heard so many horror stories about coaches that have messed up with kids (swing, pitching mechanics and so forth).  I would like to know to whom I can resort to.  Sometimes, I wish we live in Seattle so we can go to Driveline, but there is no such thing here in Colorado. 

 

Thanks for you answer, Cabbagedad, it has given me a lot to think.

 

VENEZUELAN DUDE IN CO,

Not sure where exactly you are in CO, and I am not from there, but have really good things about FAST arm care in Denver. I believe one of their players/trainers is Peter Bayer who is in the minors and has trained at driveline in the past. I also believe Jason Hirsh is the owner. Obviously take this with a grain of salt as I have not been there myself, but it may be an interesting place to at least check out

Re: USMMA.

I know well two baseball players. Sea Year did not interfere with baseball. Served after baseball season and returned in late fall.

A graduate has a six (?) year stint in the Reserves as an officer. Two weeks a year are given to USN - however, if a graduate desires, he can go into active service with a wide array of choices, including combat arms as well as ships.

Graduates are not limited to sea duty; I know grads who work in ports (a 9 - 5 job); I know grads who ship out for six months at a time and are off (but still collecting vacation pay) for much of the rest of the year (and earn six figures).

Not a college for everyone, but the grads can work wherever and whenever each wants. (Basically show up at the union hall and head out to sea, or take "day" jobs at the port. One grad I know times his voyages to baseball season - he coaches HS baseball.) Promotions (from third, to second, etc.) are based upon hours worked, so a grad constantly at sea rises quickly.

VENEZUELAN DUDE IN CO,

Seems your son was a mirror of mine.  Threw 84MPH after Soph year and he only played legion his rising soph and junior seasons.  We started by making a list of schools that would fit academically and for baseball.  We initially focused on D3.  We reached out to these schools, with a few hopeful D1, sending videos and attended their camps.  But his velo kept climbing and he eventually committed D1.  He received numerous offers, all based on our list and the camps we attended.

However, we had the luxury of being in the northeast and all schools fairly local, as my son didn't want to go far.  It was easy for us to go and be seen.  I think your biggest constraint will be wanting to play outside of CO.  Members here have much more experience, but I think the majority of CA schools, have CA players.  You will need to work extremely hard to get on their radars, when they have similar kids in their back yards.

There's a lot of time between now and the summer, when you start on your travel teams and MAYBE get in front of the schools you desire.  Make a video of your son, send out to schools, get on the coaches radar.  You will need to start visiting schools, just from an admissions perspective, see if coaches will meet with you, etc.  I always tell people, getting my son recruited was a part time job, and you need to work real hard at it.  Now, if he was throwing 94, that's a different story...

 

Venezuelan dude in CO posted:
JCG posted:

He's close to where he needs to be academically for Cal Poly (though keep in mind that CA State schools use unweighted GPA) but I don't think that he's a match there baseball-wise unless he brings the velo up.  For Caltech he needs to bring the SAT up and the GPA too, if he can, but I bet the baseball coach would love to have him.

To his list of  CA Engineering -Stem schools he should add Harvey Mudd in D3 and, if his velo trends up, the UC system in D1.

IMHO.

Thanks, JCG, for your message.

Son's velo is trending up. He got serious about training and lifting during this fall; trained really hard for 10 weeks without any distractions ---girls, football, percussion, etc.  and his velo went from 78-79 to 82-84.  We attended a Pitching camp/showcase last weekend and he overheard a conversation in which an assistant coach said to the head coach that his velo was between 83-85; that still needs to be confirmed by the rapsodo report .  So, yes, he is trending up.  He took the SAT at the beginning of his Sophomore year with no preparation (scored 1310); took it again this year with some more preparation, therefore we are optimistic. Son is willing to take the SAT as many times necessary until he scores 1500. In regards to the GPA,  he has straight A's, so I'm guessing he has a 4.0 unweighted.  

Definitely will add Mudd Scrips to the list along with Cal Poly Pomona, Cal Tech and UC Davis.  

Once again, thanks!

Venezuelan dad in CO

You're welcome - btw Cal Poly Pomona isn't really known for its engineering school.

If your son does get to D1 numbers he should also look at UCSD, an excellent school in an excellent location, and which starts playing D1 next spring.

Good luck!

Goosegg posted:

I know well two baseball players. Sea Year did not interfere with baseball. Served after baseball season and returned in late fall.

 

Thanks, I should not have said "most". I know one midshipman well (I actually suggested that he pursue USMMA) who missed his sophomore baseball season at sea. He got playing time as a freshman in part bc the kid ahead of him was at sea that year. I think there might even be a sea year option on a ship out of Kings Point. Probably depends on your specific situation. In any event, USMMA is a great option that many people don't know about.

I've asked for more info on USMMA and its sea year. Both of the men I know did a "split sea year;" other kids did miss a year of baseball. So, it's up to the midshipman. Also, while they were there, the docked ship was available, I'm not sure if it is still there.

One further note, all graduates are certified engineers (exciting time when the results are in and the kid rings the bell in celebration) AND have major credits towards a Masters degree.

Venezuelan dude in CO posted:
JCG posted:

He's close to where he needs to be academically for Cal Poly (though keep in mind that CA State schools use unweighted GPA) but I don't think that he's a match there baseball-wise unless he brings the velo up.  For Caltech he needs to bring the SAT up and the GPA too, if he can, but I bet the baseball coach would love to have him.

To his list of  CA Engineering -Stem schools he should add Harvey Mudd in D3 and, if his velo trends up, the UC system in D1.

IMHO.

Thanks, JCG, for your message.

Son's velo is trending up. He got serious about training and lifting during this fall; trained really hard for 10 weeks without any distractions ---girls, football, percussion, etc.  and his velo went from 78-79 to 82-84.  We attended a Pitching camp/showcase last weekend and he overheard a conversation in which an assistant coach said to the head coach that his velo was between 83-85; that still needs to be confirmed by the rapsodo report .  So, yes, he is trending up.  He took the SAT at the beginning of his Sophomore year with no preparation (scored 1310); took it again this year with some more preparation, therefore we are optimistic. Son is willing to take the SAT as many times necessary until he scores 1500. In regards to the GPA,  he has straight A's, so I'm guessing he has a 4.0 unweighted.  

Definitely will add Mudd Scrips to the list along with Cal Poly Pomona, Cal Tech and UC Davis.  

Once again, thanks!

Venezuelan dad in CO

You might want to take a look at Occidental as well.  He is close enough with grades right now, he would still need to improve his velo.  HOWEVER, if he is serious about engineering & maybe Cal Tech, Occidental has a 3/2 program with Cal Tech.  You get both a BA from Oxy & BS from Cal Tech in 5 years.  Its a sly little way to get into Cal Tech.  As someone else already mentioned you have to have absolutely stellar grades/scores to get into Cal Tech. 

Venezuela - Sent you a PM.  I would also suggest that you reach out to COACHLD on this forum.  He is a wealth of knowledge and is based near Denver and can point you in the direction of some very good instruction/trainers in the Denver area that may be what you are looking for.  

1) Check current rosters of the schools he is interested in.  See where the players are from, and check their bios.

2)  Then go over to Perfectgame.org and do a player search on some of the pitchers on the team for their HS measurables.   You may get an idea of the fit for those schools or where to aim.

When keewartson was first "looking" or rather, taking an interest in, colleges outside of VA, he suggested Dallas Baptist.  A quick look at the roster and ALL of the players came from Texas, at that time.  It is eye opening to see rosters of big schools in Florida, Texas, and CA select most of their players from their own state.  

Venezuelan dude in CO posted:
cabbagedad posted:

Welcome to the site.  You came to the right place.  First, know that you can search topics here and find a ton of information that way as well as posting specific questions.  Just from a baseball standpoint, Cal Poly and Cal Tech are worlds apart.  Cal Poly is a frequently ranked D1 program that is able to bring in top recruits.  If your son is good enough to play there, he will know very soon if not already.  Touching 84 wont' do it.  Cal Tech is a D3 program who is historically weak in baseball (but improving!) and would be a much easier target with regards to making the roster and getting a chance to contribute.  

Engineering is a great field of study but one that will instantly reduce the number of college options where it will be feasible to play baseball.  Again, there are a ton of threads you can search here on that topic.  There are options but they are relatively limited when you look at how realistic it is to commit to playing college baseball and also meet the requirements of engineering programs simultaneously.  Also know that California and Florida are two baseball hotbeds where the supply of really good baseball players far exceeds the demand... more so than in any other states, I believe.  Embry Riddle may be one to look at in Florida.  

Your son will need a solid recruiting plan for baseball along with a smart plan for college selection.  How far along is he in putting that together?  Does he play with a travel organization that will get him in front of the right schools?  Is he getting proper instruction to maximize his abilities?  To what extent has he been exposed to pitching against rosters of college-ready hitters?  How has he done in that environment?  These are just a few starter questions.  From there, many here can offer more specific advice.

Profile says you're in CO... School of Mines is one that comes up often as a good choice.  There was a recent thread that discussed specific schools good for engineering majors but I can't find in a search.  Can someone else pull that link?

PS - your profile is a but confusing... stated like you are the player but your post says you are the dad ??  No big deal either way but people like to know so they can advise accordingly.

Cabbagedad, thanks for your message.

Son started the profile, but I posted the question.  We already fixed the profile because I will be using it more often.

We were thinking more in Cal Poly Pomona, I understand that is a Div II school.  Son went to a showcase at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and came back disappointed.  He wants a more balanced experience.  Colorado School of Mines is, definitely, an option.  Mines is a Div II school with a focus on STEM and Engineering, so it is at the top of our list ---"our" meaning mom and myself  

In regards to the recruiting plan... Uh Oh, you got me, I have not done my homework well.  I mean, we have been attending showcase camps in Colorado; son attended one of the Stanford University Summer Camps, but I have to admit that those camps have not put my son in front of the "right" schools.  Also, for the past two summers we have been avoiding travel organizations and played Legion Ball instead. Probably that's the result of baseball being an afterthought and devoting  equal time to other extracurricular activities (Football, Percussion, Robotics and so forth).  On the other hand, playing travel baseball is really pricey, and I still have the impression that they won't put my son in front of the "right" schools. Anyways, this year we committed to a travel organization, and I think they have contacts with mid-west and southeast schools, lets see how it goes.  

Son will be playing Varsity this coming year, our league has a lot of college-ready hitters in Boulder, Fort Collins and South Denver Metro, so this is something that is yet to be seen.  However, in the showcases he is been part of, he had performed fairly well.  For instance, last summer at the Stanford Camp he pitched a two run, three hits, eight innings game.  He was really lucky that his squad had no pitchers left for that scrimmage and the coach in charge allowed him to go the entire route. 

Here in Colorado is really hard to have the proper instruction, I mean, is really hard to separate the wheat from the chaff.   We have heard so many horror stories about coaches that have messed up with kids (swing, pitching mechanics and so forth).  I would like to know to whom I can resort to.  Sometimes, I wish we live in Seattle so we can go to Driveline, but there is no such thing here in Colorado. 

 

Thanks for you answer, Cabbagedad, it has given me a lot to think.

 

There is a poster her that is in CO (roothogg66) that seems to know a lot about the drivline program. You should reach out to him for some suggestions.

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