So, the transcript is important.   The coach usually has an academic liason who runs interference to Admissions for him.   it is going to depend on the weekend availability of that liason and somebody representing Admissions.   Typically, we heard back within a week (not a weekend) unless the Coach is experienced and fully confident in your son's numbers.

This is a major first step that demonstrates they are very interested.   Enjoy it.   There will be many eyes on him.  Tell him to try to relax, be himself and take it all in.   

Good luck.

A D3 "offer" takes various forms, and you need to figure out which is the one for each school. 

- if it's a school where he might not otherwise get in (either because his scores are slightly low, or because it is extremely selective), then an "offer" is the coach saying, "I want you on the team, and I will make it work with admissions."  Alternatively, he might say "if you get in on your own, I'd be glad to have you on the team," which is not the same kind of "offer"

- if it's a school where he would likely be admitted on his own, then an offer could be  "I don't take more than 35 people on the team, and you would be one of the 35" (plenty of stories here on hsbbw of how that could play out)

- or, at a school where he would likely be admitted, an offer could simply be "I like you and I'd be glad to have you on the team."  In that case, the team could have over 50 players.

My suggestion is to try to get a sense of which of these you are dealing with, before you plan a visit, especially if it's a long way away.  If they do an academic pre-read, you want to know what the result is - coach should tell you some version of the above statements.  You still might choose to do the visit, but at least you'll have a better sense of what kinds of questions you and your son should be asking while there (especially asking the team members during the overnight part). 

 

Congratulations. This is an exciting time. Listen to what AnotherParent had to say. Also remember that D3 recruiting is a long process. The student needs to be accepted, Then there is the Fafsa, and possibly the CSS profile. Then the school will put together the Financial package (NOT the coach, the school) Then you need to decide if you can afford it and is it worth the cost. 

So Even if there is an "Offer", there is no need to close any doors. It is nice to have more than one Financial offer to compare and contrast.  

I'd say it's a very good indication but I would not necessarily assume a "roster offer" - I think it just depends on the way the HC and program recruits.  I have heard of recruits who were asked to go on an overnight visit but did not end up receiving a "roster spot" or other offer or assistance from the HC.  That's just anecdotal, but probably not a bad way to look at it - per Bishop, keep open as many doors as possible.  D3 recruiting is very fluid and if there is someone higher on their board at your son's position who comes back into the equation, they may not commit to a spot for him.  It just seems like there are as many approaches to D3 baseball recruiting as there are D3 programs.  It can be frustrating for sure.

Hope he does get an "offer" that works for him and that the school is a good academic, athletic and social fit! 

Quick question.  If your son really likes a school and coach encourages him to apply ED, do you still apply to another school ED? Seems like the coaches want you to go ED to show admissions you're really interested.  But, I feel like you expose your child to scrambling for a place.

 

By definition, a person can only apply to one place Early Decision, and if you are admitted, you are committed to going there.  You sign a statement that says that if admitted, you will pull any other applications.   So, that's why coaches as recruits to commits to applying ED, and in return the coach helps your application through admissions. 

Some schools have Early Action (EA) instead, which is early but non-binding - that is, they tell you early if you got in, but you are not required to attend.  You have to read the admissions material carefully to figure out which it is.

anotherparent posted:

By definition, a person can only apply to one place Early Decision, and if you are admitted, you are committed to going there.  You sign a statement that says that if admitted, you will pull any other applications.   So, that's why coaches as recruits to commits to applying ED, and in return the coach helps your application through admissions. 

Some schools have Early Action (EA) instead, which is early but non-binding - that is, they tell you early if you got in, but you are not required to attend.  You have to read the admissions material carefully to figure out which it is.

If a student is accepted ED, and the final financial package is not what you expected or now affordable I think that is the ONE OUT of ED acceptance a student will have.

I think that is the case, others may be able to confirm or dispute.  All good.

Gov posted:
anotherparent posted:

By definition, a person can only apply to one place Early Decision, and if you are admitted, you are committed to going there.  You sign a statement that says that if admitted, you will pull any other applications.   So, that's why coaches as recruits to commits to applying ED, and in return the coach helps your application through admissions. 

Some schools have Early Action (EA) instead, which is early but non-binding - that is, they tell you early if you got in, but you are not required to attend.  You have to read the admissions material carefully to figure out which it is.

If a student is accepted ED, and the final financial package is not what you expected or now affordable I think that is the ONE OUT of ED acceptance a student will have.

I think that is the case, others may be able to confirm or dispute.  All good.

that is how I understand it as well. 

BishopLeftiesDad posted:
Gov posted:
anotherparent posted:

By definition, a person can only apply to one place Early Decision, and if you are admitted, you are committed to going there.  You sign a statement that says that if admitted, you will pull any other applications.   So, that's why coaches as recruits to commits to applying ED, and in return the coach helps your application through admissions. 

Some schools have Early Action (EA) instead, which is early but non-binding - that is, they tell you early if you got in, but you are not required to attend.  You have to read the admissions material carefully to figure out which it is.

If a student is accepted ED, and the final financial package is not what you expected or now affordable I think that is the ONE OUT of ED acceptance a student will have.

I think that is the case, others may be able to confirm or dispute.  All good.

that is how I understand it as well. 

This is correct.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×