Skip to main content

Replies sorted oldest to newest

What I don’t believe is available is a percentage of opportunities to drive in runs divided by success rate. I could be for runner on third, runner on second, runnerve on second and third with zero, one or two outs.

I’ve seen players drive in one hundred runs who should have driven in one hundred twenty to one hundred thirty had they not failed so often in big moments. They got to one hundred RBI’s by having so many opportunities..

Are there really good hitters who perform bad with runners on and bad hitters performing well with runners on?



Of course it can happen over a small sample that a good hitter hits balls at someone all the time with risp and a bad hitters getting some timely bloop hits and sometimes it is over a whole season but long term I would expect the good hitter getting the job done more often.

I wouldn't want a hitter to worry my hitters too much about runners, just wait for a good pitch to hit and drive it to the outfield, preferably on a line.

No, I meant that when they are checking the runner behind them and then swivelling back to home plate, it's presumably different/harder than if they are just looking at the catcher the whole time.  Definitely happens in HS ball, I assume at higher levels they are supposed to be trained out of it, but from watching a lot of collegiate games, I can see that's not always the case.

@Consultant posted:

Yesterday, I noticed the Cubs/Cardinals game. The hitters "left on base" 43 runners in 10 innings.

Question: is there a metric to measure a hitter's ability to drive in runs? Can this ability be taught by a coach or parent?

Bob

IMO some players heart rates go up with RISP leading to underperforming and some players heart rates stay the same leading to better performance in run scoring situations.  The best way to "coach" this is by putting the player in high leverage situations over time.  Tournament baseball - winners and losers against the best competition you can find helps - HS district games and HS playoffs are probably the best developer of this ability and the best measure of future performance.  Sons' HS coach also made it a cardinal sin to not score a runner from 3B with less than 2 outs.  Worked on it relentlessly in practice and there were repercussions during games or lineup adjustments in future games for failing in those situations. 

@Consultant posted:

Launch;

what techniques did your son's coach use to teach to the player?

"fine focus", position in the batter's box, study of the pitcher's patterns, "choke" the bat?

Baseball is a game of adjustments.

Bob

every practice ended with the same situational drill - runners on 2/3 1 out - hitter got 1 pitch - with the coach set up ridiculously close to the plate throwing BB's - hitters only job was to score the runner(s) - strike out/IF pop-up/GB back to pitcher  would cause you to run....over and over through the lineup and potential pinch hitters...

Add Reply

Post
.
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×