@Pedaldad posted:

Why not, if it makes the situation better?

Don't see anything wrong with wanting the NCAA to adjust/increase the 11.7/27 rule.  It helps teams, coaches, and players at minimal extra cost to schools.  This takes away pitting a freshman with a signed NLI against a returning proven upperclassmen.

Remember, we are talking about athletes' education, but also coaches' livelihood.  It is a different world in Ivy's, Patriot, HA D3 leagues where coaches don't have typical pressure of on-field success to keep their jobs.  Heck, 3 of the 8 Ivy coaches have been there for between 22  to 30 years.  The best winning percentage among them is right at 50%, and that is the best in the conference.

In places where coaches need to win to keep their job, it is going to be different.  Gary Gilmore has been the head coach at Coastal for 25 years because he wins.  Mike Sansing has been the head coach at Kennesaw because he wins.  If they weren't winning consistently, they get replaced quickly.

So why is it wrong for someone to support reducing the burden put on coaches and players.  If all 35 positions could have funding, there would be no question about who is really on the team and who isn't.  If the Ivy's don't grant any athletic scholarships with their ridiculous endowments and Georgetown only wants to grant 5 baseball scholarships with their $1.7 billion endowment, so what.  

Huh? Sounds as if you may have some underlying issues. Everybody is trying to pick a fight nowadays, I guess it's the new normal.

 

@adbono posted:

“You can drive a car with your feet if you want to. That don’t make it a good f*****g idea!”

- Chris Rock 

I use both feet when I drive. Is there some other way to do it?

@57special posted:

The vast majority of kids and parents of HS BB players that I have run into do not think like this. They would rather go to a D1 JUCO than a D3. It is often because they do not have the academic chops to give them the HA option(s), but I am often mystified seeing relatively well educated parents pour tens of thousands of dollars into baseball training their son, but not a nickel for tutoring. The players who seem to benefit most from the HA route appear to be players who come from private schools. There, both the parent and the school are of one mind in using sports to leverage their way in to the best possible academic situation.

   

During my kid’s school years I marveled at the money parents would spend because their kid hit .250 as opposed to spending any money on a tutor because the kid got a C in Math. 

I didn't spend money on my kid for lessons and very little for him to play travel but do wish I had spent some money on someone helping with ACT/SAT scores.  He had As/Bs all the way through but there is easy money there if you have the right ACT/SAT scores. 

Yeah, it's a whole different world if your player can get into the HA tier of schools. There are still some very good players, but FAR less of them, and coaches are very interested in a player that can play for them who has a 3.5+ GPA, a 30+ ACT, and some rigor in their HS transcript. The JUCO, scholarship D1(with some obvious exceptions such as Stanford, Vandy, Rice, etc.), and D2 schools have a "meat market" feel to them. 

I understand that we come in all shapes, sizes, and talents, and am not judging. I am a Tradesman, myself, and had a spotty academic record.

@PitchingFan posted:

I didn't spend money on my kid for lessons and very little for him to play travel but do wish I had spent some money on someone helping with ACT/SAT scores.  He had As/Bs all the way through but there is easy money there if you have the right ACT/SAT scores. 

High grades make a kid eligible for athletic and academic money. My kids only received 25% athletic. But they received 50% academic money. All they had to do keep it was maintain a 3.0 gpa. Going in I told them if they don’t graduate with a 3.5 or better enter the job market or grad school as average as everyone else. 

My daughter was so afraid softball would affect her grades she graduated with a 3.97. My son got a 2.7 the first semester. This is the kid who has mastered falling out of trees and landing on his feet scoring a perfect 10. I told him he would be at the local JuCo next year if he didn’t get a 3.3 the second semester. He got a 3.5. I informed him 3.5 became the expectation. He graduated with a 3.6 in three years by getting 3.7 to 4.0 the rest of the way and went on to the MBA program. He went from screwing off first semester to taking summer classes online while playing summer ball. 

Last edited by RJM
@ABSORBER posted:

Huh? Sounds as if you may have some underlying issues. Everybody is trying to pick a fight nowadays, I guess it's the new normal.

 

No, just my own take on life and college baseball. 

I'm noticing an uptick in players entering the portal over the past few days heading toward the draft next week.  Interesting that a number of these guys were 2019 and very highly ranked PG guys(Top 100 in their class).  Coaches have until July 1 to notify players in writing if their scholarship is not being renewed.  I hope they are not waiting that long.

I was surprised to hear that one high academic, west coast d3 program has 4 kids who just graduated returning to play next year.

 I get the desire. Kids who are at the end of  their playing road want to finish on their own terms. Still, that's a lot of coin for 30-35 games.

I was surprised to hear that one high academic, west coast d3 program has 4 kids who just graduated returning to play next year.

 I get the desire. Kids who are at the end of  their playing road want to finish on their own terms. Still, that's a lot of coin for 30-35 games.

1. Current job market is difficult at best. 

2. Get your Masters from a highly regarded institution.

3. Play your "Sr" Baseball season in college.  

4. Bonus if mommy and daddy foot the bill. (or maybe industry funded*)

Don't see a downside if 4 is true.  

* my son got his masters fully funded by industry. 

All good points you made, BOF.  Wonder how aid works for those returners?  I imagine the same way but still seems a little strange.  Of course, these are strange times.  And getting more strange every day.

 

 

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