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Minnesota used to make an early swing thru Texas at the beginning of spring. One of the hardest hit balls I have ever seen was hit by a Gopher off a fastball that I served up one sunny Saturday afternoon.  The ball never got more than 8’ high and bounced off a post that supported the LF fence, putting a dent in it.  The hitter was some guy named Paul Molitor. 

Think their early trip now is thru Arizona. Looks like they play tough early schedule. Start next year with Vandy!!! Saw they also play the Twins rookies every year. Facilities are very cool with new athletes village.

My guy is a 2021 RHP committed to them. As an IOWA grad, when I got my Minnie gear on I almost went out and egged my own damn house!

Great program.  They sort of have their own way of doing things recruiting wise.  Kids come to them.  

Yeah, local twin cities kids say that they have more chance getting recruited with out of state P5 programs than the Gophers. Wonder if St. Thomas(turning D1 next year) is going to start to scoop talent from them, also. They have a rep of being a bit passive when it comes to recruiting, but on the other hand they don't recruit a ton of kids only to cut them loose after the first year.

Last edited by 57special
@adbono posted:

Minnesota used to make an early swing thru Texas at the beginning of spring. One of the hardest hit balls I have ever seen was hit by a Gopher off a fastball that I served up one sunny Saturday afternoon.  The ball never got more than 8’ high and bounced off a post that supported the LF fence, putting a dent in it.  The hitter was some guy named Paul Molitor. 

Does it lessen the pain knowing you were tattooed by a hall of famer?

@Consultant posted:

Adbono,

What would you suggest to his son to prepare to compete with future Molitor, Winfield, Kendall and other former Gophers. Big ten is a strong conference. 

Incomping Freshman should play college style now. 

Bob

Great question Bob. I would tell him the same thing I tell all the guys I work with.    1) understand the mechanics of how you throw the ball well enough to self diagnose and be your own pitching coach. 2) get to the point where you can throw 3 different pitches for a strike in any count.     3) understand your strengths and your limitations. Know what is your out pitch.   4) be confident but not arrogant. Believe in yourself always - even in tough times.     5) pay attention to detail. Learn to hold runners. Develop a good slide step. Work 50% of your bullpens out of the stretch.     6) work on your change up with the goal of making it into your best pitch.                  7) watch the best senior pitchers and do what they do. They can teach you how to prepare for success - on the field and off. 8) take care of business in the classroom and ask for a tutor if one is necessary.       9) work on fastball command and learn to hit 2 spots anytime you want to : low & away and in under the hands.                       10) be open minded and willing to learn.    11) be a good teammate and be respectful 12) be on time for class & team functions 13) work hard on fielding your position.    14) call me if you have any problems           15) have fun and understand how fortunate you are for this opportunity.       16) try to stay on an even emotional keel. Don’t get too high and don’t get too low.  17) take responsibility for your own career 18) take care of your body and your arm. 19) lift weights sensibly - you are a baseball player and not a body builder      20) sit next to your pitching coach when you aren’t pitching. Watch how pitches are called and learn the art of setting up hitters. 
  That’s a good start just off the top of my head. 

@adbono posted:

Great question Bob. I would tell him the same thing I tell all the guys I work with.    1) understand the mechanics of how you throw the ball well enough to self diagnose and be your own pitching coach. 2) get to the point where you can throw 3 different pitches for a strike in any count.     3) understand your strengths and your limitations. Know what is your out pitch.   4) be confident but not arrogant. Believe in yourself always - even in tough times.     5) pay attention to detail. Learn to hold runners. Develop a good slide step. Work 50% of your bullpens out of the stretch.     6) work on your change up with the goal of making it into your best pitch.                  7) watch the best senior pitchers and do what they do. They can teach you how to prepare for success - on the field and off. 8) take care of business in the classroom and ask for a tutor if one is necessary.       9) work on fastball command and learn to hit 2 spots anytime you want to : low & away and in under the hands.                       10) be open minded and willing to learn.    11) be a good teammate and be respectful 12) be on time for class & team functions 13) work hard on fielding your position.    14) call me if you have any problems           15) have fun and understand how fortunate you are for this opportunity.       16) try to stay on an even emotional keel. Don’t get too high and don’t get too low.  17) take responsibility for your own career 18) take care of your body and your arm. 19) lift weights sensibly - you are a baseball player and not a body builder      20) sit next to your pitching coach when you aren’t pitching. Watch how pitches are called and learn the art of setting up hitters. 
  That’s a good start just off the top of my head. 

Really good information!

Minnesota looks like a nice mix of old time coach (John Anderson 14) and 2 young guys that are really adding tech and analytics to hitting and pitching. Ty McDevitt PC and hc is Paul Casey.

That and their new athletes village pretty much sell the kids. 

But you are correct. They did not seek out my guy. He just visited them for a camp 2 days before covid hit and they liked each other.

 

@Good Knight posted:

So your advice would be to go Cape Cod instead of playing with college teammates and close to college coaches that recruited him? Or is it as simple as asking his PC?

 

It’s very hard to get an invite to the Cape - although not as hard as it used to be. It takes a year or two of proven performance at the college level before playing in the Cape is a realistic possibility. Lots (but not all) of the players in the Cape are there to be evaluated for their MLB draft potential. The Cape isn’t somewhere you go play summer ball just because you want to. 

I think you go where your college coach places you and say thank you very much for sending you wherever that is.

Son was set to go to Cape, we had a great summer vacation planned. Now he's playing in Waterloo, Iowa, with Northwoods. From a baseball perspective, he's fortunate to be playing. From a vacation perspective, Waterloo is no Cape Cod.

@Iowamom23 posted:

I think you go where your college coach places you and say thank you very much for sending you wherever that is.

Son was set to go to Cape, we had a great summer vacation planned. Now he's playing in Waterloo, Iowa, with Northwoods. From a baseball perspective, he's fortunate to be playing. From a vacation perspective, Waterloo is no Cape Cod.

Haven’t you taken a cruise to the islands from Waterloo? 😁

@57special posted:

Waterloo is a hell of a lot cheaper!

Northwoods is a grind. Much more travel than CC.

Not when you're a PO playing during a pandemic. Son is only required to travel when pitching on the road. I think maybe two or three times so far and one more trip planned before season ends. Otherwise, he shows up to work out, to throw bull pens, to golf and to pitch.

I think he may be missing some key parts of the experience. 

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