I don't see any more than maybe 2 of those  being at 2.2.....your arm strength is a major issue at this point if you're hoping to really cut your pop times down.  A few of those throws are 12-15' high when they cross the pitchers mound.....you need to be throwing them at or a foot above his head.  Work on that and your POP times will come down.  Your footwork doesn't look bad on the throws that the pitcher gave you that you could work with....it's all an arm issue right now.  Once you get that down, I'd make a couple other suggestions.  1) try to find a field with grass infield....it's really hard to get an accurate idea of where the ball is when it blends into the dirt.  2)  have a 2nd baseman catch your throws.  If it's not perfect....delete it.  The couple that hit the net 6' above the base do more harm than good.

CollegeParentNoMore posted:

The video camera is a mile away.  Try shooting closer from the 1st dugout side so all your mechanics can be clearly seem.  Edit to exclude the standing around time, take more time to recover between throws.

Thank you, I got more video today. Will post the link. 

Buckeye 2015 posted:

I don't see any more than maybe 2 of those  being at 2.2.....your arm strength is a major issue at this point if you're hoping to really cut your pop times down.  A few of those throws are 12-15' high when they cross the pitchers mound.....you need to be throwing them at or a foot above his head.  Work on that and your POP times will come down.  Your footwork doesn't look bad on the throws that the pitcher gave you that you could work with....it's all an arm issue right now.  Once you get that down, I'd make a couple other suggestions.  1) try to find a field with grass infield....it's really hard to get an accurate idea of where the ball is when it blends into the dirt.  2)  have a 2nd baseman catch your throws.  If it's not perfect....delete it.  The couple that hit the net 6' above the base do more harm than good.

Thanks for the reply. I am working on arm strength. Lifting now until March. I got more video today on a grass field. Will post the link ASAP. 

Again, the footwork isn't bad....but the video overall is of absolutely no use to you....though the camera angle from there is much better than from behind 2nd.  Throwing to a net just doesn't work....you just can't get an idea of where the throws really are.   I wouldn't bother doing another one until you can have a player at 2nd catching your throws.  Heck, have your little sister or brother stand off to the side 5-10 feet away and throw to you...and let the kid in the video (looks like he can play )  be your second baseman.   Also find someway to edit them....you don't need that many..... you only need 6-8 good ones at most....and there is no reason to show one that went 5' right of 2nd base.

One thing I do notice is on every ball that comes at you in the strike zone, your glove drops an inch or two....comes around almost in an "under" type of movement if that makes sense?....... and then comes back up to meet your throwing hand.  Work on keeping it where you caught it....stand and bring your throwing hand to the mitt.  There is just so much less movement and time involved that way.    You'll be amazed at how much quicker your release is.  Keep working....good luck

Buckeye 2015 posted:

Again, the footwork isn't bad....but the video overall is of absolutely no use to you....though the camera angle from there is much better than from behind 2nd.  Throwing to a net just doesn't work....you just can't get an idea of where the throws really are.   I wouldn't bother doing another one until you can have a player at 2nd catching your throws.  Heck, have your little sister or brother stand off to the side 5-10 feet away and throw to you...and let the kid in the video (looks like he can play )  be your second baseman.   Also find someway to edit them....you don't need that many..... you only need 6-8 good ones at most....and there is no reason to show one that went 5' right of 2nd base.

One thing I do notice is on every ball that comes at you in the strike zone, your glove drops an inch or two....comes around almost in an "under" type of movement if that makes sense?....... and then comes back up to meet your throwing hand.  Work on keeping it where you caught it....stand and bring your throwing hand to the mitt.  There is just so much less movement and time involved that way.    You'll be amazed at how much quicker your release is.  Keep working....good luck

Thanks for the glove movement tip, will work on it. As for the helping of the video shooting, I will try to get help. Hard to have people that will help you when they want to do other things. Where do you suggest that I have the camera at? I have it set up on a tripod and can't have anyone hold it. 

My opinion, your throwing hand should not be at your cup, but behind the glove.  When you receive the ball, let the ball momentum, with the guidance of your left arm guide the  ball and the glove up towards your right shoulder while rotating the glove, so that your hand can simply grab the ball and release (this is a quicker way to get the arm into the throwing position).  The ball has to cooperate (meaning your pitcher needs to target better for video). Also, get your pitchers phone to record the ball coming into the bag, so you can show both views.   Good luck!

Welsey;

you should focus on the "role of a catcher'. Arm strength is only one phase and their are several methods to adjust. During infield speed up your throws to the bases, move in the front of the plate.

QUICK RELEASE! as I have mentioned you can warm up with a teammate by catching the ball off the heal of the mitt for quick transfer.

1. calling the game. "read the bat"

2. read the runner. when is stealing " is his right toe point to second base

3. know your pitcher, give him signs for "pick off"

4. set signs with your 1b for the "pick off" from you.

During our Goodwill Series Japan, Korea and Australia, our catchers learn the "little" things and they improve.

Bobhttp://goodwillseries.org/

Consultant posted:

Welsey;

you should focus on the "role of a catcher'. Arm strength is only one phase and their are several methods to adjust. During infield speed up your throws to the bases, move in the front of the plate.

QUICK RELEASE! as I have mentioned you can warm up with a teammate by catching the ball off the heal of the mitt for quick transfer.

1. calling the game. "read the bat"

2. read the runner. when is stealing " is his right toe point to second base

3. know your pitcher, give him signs for "pick off"

4. set signs with your 1b for the "pick off" from you.

During our Goodwill Series Japan, Korea and Australia, our catchers learn the "little" things and they improve.

Bobhttp://goodwillseries.org/

Okay, thank you. Now here is another question. What is the order of importance of catching skills? Like numbered, what would receiving, blocking, throwing, game calling, pitcher relationships, and etc be in order of importance?

Wesleythecacther posted:
Consultant posted:

Welsey;

you should focus on the "role of a catcher'. Arm strength is only one phase and their are several methods to adjust. During infield speed up your throws to the bases, move in the front of the plate.

QUICK RELEASE! as I have mentioned you can warm up with a teammate by catching the ball off the heal of the mitt for quick transfer.

1. calling the game. "read the bat"

2. read the runner. when is stealing " is his right toe point to second base

3. know your pitcher, give him signs for "pick off"

4. set signs with your 1b for the "pick off" from you.

During our Goodwill Series Japan, Korea and Australia, our catchers learn the "little" things and they improve.

Bobhttp://goodwillseries.org/

Okay, thank you. Now here is another question. What is the order of importance of catching skills? Like numbered, what would receiving, blocking, throwing, game calling, pitcher relationships, and etc be in order of importance?

Just asked my catcher Wesley, he said:  Receiving, Pitcher Relationship, Game Calling, Blocking and then Throwing.  He thinks Receiving is 85% of what catcher does, Blocking 10% + Throwing 5%.

Pop time and velocity are the most important aspect of catching to any coach who's job is on the line for choosing a catcher.  It's expected and those that have it, are expected to receive and block, read the bat and runners, and manage the pitchers.  Lots of people will say receiving is most important, but they will choose a guy who has a cannon for an arm over a receiver any day of the week because they believe they can teach receiving and the other catching attributes.    What I wrote is based on my experience, conversations with many coaches, and some professional pitching coaches.  The professional pitching coaches love framing and reading and believe that is most important, but you will never get that opportunity at that level if you do not have velocity to take you through the underlying systems. Velocity is an easy disqualifier.  Work on velocity.

2forU posted:

Pop time and velocity are the most important aspect of catching to any coach who's job is on the line for choosing a catcher.  It's expected and those that have it, are expected to receive and block, read the bat and runners, and manage the pitchers.  Lots of people will say receiving is most important, but they will choose a guy who has a cannon for an arm over a receiver any day of the week because they believe they can teach receiving and the other catching attributes.    What I wrote is based on my experience, conversations with many coaches, and some professional pitching coaches.  The professional pitching coaches love framing and reading and believe that is most important, but you will never get that opportunity at that level if you do not have velocity to take you through the underlying systems. Velocity is an easy disqualifier.  Work on velocity.

Thanks for the feedback, how can I work on and better velocity?

Read the Johnny Bench book. his father placed the second base bag in short CF to improve Johnny throw. Pitchers "jumped" off the mound when Johnny threw to 2b. His throws were 4' above the mound to 2b. Your arm action looks like a pitcher. Throw from the ear. Like a QB.

 

Bob

 

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