There could be many reasons. Maybe it helps him find the mal-contents. Maybe it helps him find those team players. It may not about conditioning at all, or little to do with conditioning. Do you know anyone who was actually cut, from the team, due to not making the time?

Maybe once practices starts he does not want to have to spend time on conditioning. I know of more than one d3 college that required players to run a mile or two in under a certain period time to be able to start practices, with the team. If you couldn't you were running during practice. Practices are fast paced and running from station to station. Little to no standing around. 

Unless we know the motivation, there is no reason to point fingers or judge the coach. As others have said, everybody just needs to understand what they can control and worry about that. 

 

This thread reminds me of a funny letter I once read about training. I was reading through some old letters saved by my family. One was a letter to my great grandfather. He played football, ran track and played baseball in college for his graduating class of 1890. 

The letter was from the captain of the football team received a week before college started in the fall ... Our first game is a week after we return to campus. Either quit smoking or at least cut back. Run a mile each day for  the next week.

As if this would make a difference! 

YachtRocker posted:

My son's HS coach has just announced (it's mid November 2019) that all 2020 team prospects will need to run 2 Miles within some yet to be determined time by end of February to be considered for the HS team in 2020 

Ok, yes I understand athletes of reasonable fitness should be able to run 2 miles.. but making that the focus for a sport that otherwise embodies sprinting?   Is that a worthwhile part of baseball training in 2020?  (can it help someone be a better baseball player - or better college prospect?)

Just curious as to your thoughts,  and what time might be reasonable for a HS prospect in a 2 mile "run"?  Is there a speed/time that represents reasonable baseball "fitness"?

thanks! 

This is fairly normal where we live.  I believe it was 15 or 16 minutes which is definitely achievable.  It was one way the coaches had to separating those that were serious about high school baseball and those that weren't.   Another separator I've seen is throwing distance.   This test at tryouts qualified or disqualified an outfielders throwing arm in getting the baseball to the cutoff.   There are many more.   Your son is just getting started.   Enjoy the ride!

RJM posted:

This thread reminds me of a funny letter I once read about training. I was reading through some old letters saved by my family. One was a letter to my great grandfather. He played football, ran track and played baseball in college for his graduating class of 1890. 

The letter was from the captain of the football team received a week before college started in the fall ... Our first game is a week after we return to campus. Either quit smoking or at least cut back. Run a mile each day for  the next week.

As if this would make a difference! 

Classic.  My FIL still has his minor league contracts (before he was sent to Korea) - one provision states that the team will supply uniforms - player is responsible for his own cleats!  

My son's college team has required players to get under a certain time in the mile before they could get on the field and practice the past few years.  This past year they had to do three 100 yard sprints in under a certain time to get on the field.

When I played HS Basketball...many decades ago, varsity players had to run the mile in under 5:30.  We're we distance runners...no.  But, everyone on the team was well conditioned, worked together on getting the slower guys to push themselves, and weeded out the guys that didn't want to put in the effort.  We made it to State my senior year.  Look they're baseball players, not marathoners.  But, this gives the coach a look at physical toughness, leadership, mental toughness, and work ethic. 

 

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×