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I don’t think the NCAA is what many of you think it is.  Just like the title of this thread, this is the world today!!!

https://www.cbssports.com/coll...ulation-of-ncaa/amp/

Instantly lost me when they started with the hysterics of the health risks of covid on 17 year old athletes in peak condition and health. Getting in the car to go on their visit is significantly more dangerous for their health than getting covid. That's not political, it's a fact. Getting past the virtue signaling...

Everybody hates the NCAA - and they do not do themselves any favors to drown out the noise. But is this not a good thing? Has to be a better way to penalize schools for the sins of the former regime than to inflict punishment on the current guys.

Imagine being a freshman on the Penn State football team in 2013 and not being able to play in a bowl game your entire time there - and not being able to transfer out because of something that happened in 1998, probably 3 years after you were born.

I think it's great when athletes get to make money from signing jerseys or having their pictures in video games or getting a cut of jerseys with their numbers.  I think it's great if they can use their status to have a podcast or social media presence and earn money from it.  I think it's great if they can advertise products, earning what the company making the products thinks they are worth.  I'm all for capitalism and athletes monetizing their fame at market value.

But as long as the football teams are part of universities, I think the universities (i.e. coaches) should control any payments to players.  They already give scholarships.  If universities want to pay their players, either from donations or from media revenue, then do it.  But donors with funds outside of any oversight, giving money in return for one appearance at a charity, just allows way too many different types of corruption, and basically makes the players the employees of someone other than the team.

I think it's great when athletes get to make money from signing jerseys or having their pictures in video games or getting a cut of jerseys with their numbers.  I think it's great if they can use their status to have a podcast or social media presence and earn money from it.  I think it's great if they can advertise products, earning what the company making the products thinks they are worth.  I'm all for capitalism and athletes monetizing their fame at market value.

But as long as the football teams are part of universities, I think the universities (i.e. coaches) should control any payments to players.  They already give scholarships.  If universities want to pay their players, either from donations or from media revenue, then do it.  But donors with funds outside of any oversight, giving money in return for one appearance at a charity, just allows way too many different types of corruption, and basically makes the players the employees of someone other than the team.

I would be all for that. That’s not what’s happening. A lot of it is paying players to show up. The coaches shouldn’t be involved at all in my opinion.

I guess that I was so naive that I thought that collectives would be created to help athletes learn how to start and manage a business using their NIL, which in many places it has. I never thought many would be created to make million dollar deals... to one person.  But there is still a lot of good stuff going on.

@adbono,  I strongly agree with many points that you brought up in your post. Agree that college athletes have been screwed over the years so get it while you can, just hoping they would create collectives within reason. Giving 8mil to one recruit who hasn't set foot on campus is, well sort of outrageous.

JMO

I find it amazing that so many good intended people didn’t see the problems with NIL…it was going to change college sports (not for the better) forever the moment it was approved. The stuff you see today and find “shocking” or “appalling” is just the beginning. In 5 to10 years you won’t even recognize it,

you can’t put the genie back in the bottle so we are going to find out for better or worse.

This is a good article.

To baseballhs's point.  I think it's reasonable for coaches/universities not to be involved if an athlete with a great moustache, for example, advertises hair trimmers.  Or, for the athletic department to have a group that helps the athletes do that.

If I were a coach, I would be quite nervous about a collective that took in donations from boosters and paid money to athletes.  They have to be working with the coaches - otherwise how do they know how much to give each athlete?  A group of donors deciding on their own to give a QB $8mil?  Seems like a blurry line, though.

It is all blurry, that's the problem.

I originally became interested due to Florida football 4,5 star recruits losing interest. Billy Napier was hired and he had a pressor and indicated that the program needed to get these guys some money. All of a sudden Florida has commitments from 4 star recruits. I don't know what has changed, but Florida has new collectives and each has different objectives.

Until the NCAA and states make agreements expect the crazy stuff to continue.

@TPM posted:

It is all blurry, that's the problem.

Until the NCAA and states make agreements expect the crazy stuff to continue.

I agree and this will take years and many of them…and that is assuming the states agree, I feel pretty certain they won’t! It also assumes they will do it well which again hopes here are not high.

this is going to be a shit show for a long time

From the article... "Although a trend of deregulation is unifying the approach to NIL in various states somewhat, there remains a patchwork of state laws in place, resulting in non-uniform NIL policy across the United States. Such inconsistency creates confusion with respect to what NIL activities are permissible and what NIL activities are prohibited."

How on earth can an athletic league, in this case NCAA D1 sports, operate when each of the member teams play by different rules?  This is crazy...

@old_school posted:

I agree and this will take years and many of them…and that is assuming the states agree, I feel pretty certain they won’t! It also assumes they will do it well which again hopes here are not high.

this is going to be a shit show for a long time

All states have their own individual laws, for example no state income tax in Florida. So that means that the NCAA has to deal with making individual laws with all states and that should have been  the importance of the initial collectives, which was working with student athletes to learn best business practices and how to market themselves as a business.

I guess that original intent wasn't communicated and programs are going to do what they want because no one can say, it's illegal, unless the state has intended it to be that way.

@Smitty28 posted:

From the article... "Although a trend of deregulation is unifying the approach to NIL in various states somewhat, there remains a patchwork of state laws in place, resulting in non-uniform NIL policy across the United States. Such inconsistency creates confusion with respect to what NIL activities are permissible and what NIL activities are prohibited."

How on earth can an athletic league, in this case NCAA D1 sports, operate when each of the member teams play by different rules?  This is crazy...

Good point. There is chatter of conference rules, could be per sport.

@Smitty28 posted:

From the article... "Although a trend of deregulation is unifying the approach to NIL in various states somewhat, there remains a patchwork of state laws in place, resulting in non-uniform NIL policy across the United States. Such inconsistency creates confusion with respect to what NIL activities are permissible and what NIL activities are prohibited."

How on earth can an athletic league, in this case NCAA D1 sports, operate when each of the member teams play by different rules?  This is crazy...

It seems they will make it even more confusing by getting the government involved,  info is being sent to Tuberville and Manchin

Completely agree that the baseball (probably most college sports) recruiting world has completely changed.  Even the athlete’s campus(es) experience is probably going to be drastically altered.

Agree with much of the detail that adbono shared.  Much of what I see on the ground is inline with what adbono has shared in the past.

Most of these changes really are driven in large part to the change of the transfer portal.  Studs and developing studs are getting more then one bite at the apple.  This will negatively effect former or non-developing studs.

Where I differ is on NIL.  Most of the comments have had a underlying assumption which I think we will find to be false.  The underlying assumption is that the NIL will be used for athletes to monetize themselves by selling widgets like professional athletes have always done.  I propose that is wrong, what we will find is that boosters will find ways to use NIL to get kids on campus to better their teams, who cares if they sell widgets.  All these multimillion dollar facilities that used to attract kids where paid for by boosters.  Now boosters can skip the middle man and just pay the kid.  This is actually a good thing.  We have all complained about 11.7 for 35 slots.  Now the market can take care of the issue.  Yes it will be more capitalistic, and college sports will look different, but that might just be a good thing.  

Wouldn't that be illegal that boosters act as fake sponsors to buy athletes into the college program?



https://www.sportingnews.com/u...vs5a9nwsdv1bfl2lef8w

"NCAA recruiting rules preclude boosters from recruiting and/or providing benefits to prospective student-athletes."

@Dominik85 posted:

Wouldn't that be illegal that boosters act as fake sponsors to buy athletes into the college program?



https://www.sportingnews.com/u...vs5a9nwsdv1bfl2lef8w

"NCAA recruiting rules preclude boosters from recruiting and/or providing benefits to prospective student-athletes."

Oh, puhlease! Boosters are going to do whatever they want. They always have and they always will. The smarter ones just consult with legal counsel before they act.

@Dominik85 posted:

Wouldn't that be illegal that boosters act as fake sponsors to buy athletes into the college program?



https://www.sportingnews.com/u...vs5a9nwsdv1bfl2lef8w

"NCAA recruiting rules preclude boosters from recruiting and/or providing benefits to prospective student-athletes."

In short agree with adbono.  

But adding detail, really read the article you linked to.  The three major quotes to focus upon:

1) The celebrated change to college athletics were clarified to schools Monday, as boosters (and shell companies acting in the interest of boosters) were prohibited from having contact from incoming college athletes or their families.

Focus on the “incoming college athletes”.  It purposely excludes current athletes.  Remember this is the same organization that does not allow coaches to contact HS players before September 1 of their junior year, but players commit before then all the time.  They will figure this out.

2) But also, don't expect abusers of the early adoption of NIL to be punished.

No editorial needed.

3) The NCAA also made it clear in its governance statement this isn't to threaten eligibility of players.

Strengthens point 2.  I’ve said this before, The NCAA is not what it used to be.  The days of punishing and holding out players (Brian Bozworth, Reggie Bush) are long over.  This is a big business and it is bad business punishing your stars.

If you wonder why this is happening, here is some reading for you.

https://time.com/6074583/ncaa-supreme-court-ruling/

Last edited by Around_The_Horn
@PitchingFan posted:

People act like football and basketball players are starving.  Those people need to tour a P5 cafeteria for football and basketball.  It is like a fine food restaurant.  All free.  

This is what gets overlooked. Free tuition, free healthcare, free apparel, free training, free unlimited food, free housing, free everything. Or the players could accept a small stipend in exchange for forfeiting their housing and meal plan. Of course a lot of players made bad decisions and were eating ramen as a result. They take to twitter where the mob gets involved and the narrative becomes: NCAA makes billions while student athletes eat ramen in their dorm.

Now you give the players the ability to make money and people only want it done a certain way. If a booster wants to give somebody 8 million to come play at their school who cares. Why is signing posters at the mall or working a few camps ok but money in exhange for commitment not ok?

Too many people think with their emotions, not enough think with their heads.

@Consultant posted:

TPM,

how does the school determine which sports receive the money?

Bob

I don't think that the school determines  who gets the money. I do believe that it is determined by the collective. Some are dedicated to just one or two sports others for every athlete.  Some for those athletes in financial need.

If you are able to read, some are just created for female athletes.

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