Been having a debate about this for a while with my dad, as I have now been in the habit of having a one-handed follow through. What is your opinion on the follow through after you swing? Should you have 2 hands on the bat? Does it help you hit the ball harder? Or is it okay to have a one-handed follow through?

Original Post

I'll be curious to hear other responses.   The top hand is a big part of the equation.  In order to maximize bat speed and power, it must be fully engaged through the contact zone.  For most, a good gage to measure that is where the top hand ends up at the finish of the swing.  If it ends up at least up near the shoulder of the bottom hand,  then top hand release was not too early.  If it ends up low and across the mid-section, this is often an indication that release was early and the hitter didn't stay connected long enough.   

Beyond that, it comes down to preference, swing type, flexibility and second half extension.  Some keep both hands on, some release the top hand.  Also, it is often a result of pitch location. 

Often, when I am working with some of our hitters in the cage, I will ask that they keep both hands on the bat.  This may be because I am seeing early release or because I am seeing the swing get long too early or pulling off the ball early or it is a balance issue.  Once the issue is resolved,  I am OK with them going back to top hand release, as long as it isn't early and doesn't cause re-introduction of the initially perceived problem.

I'm just a dad and former Little League coach, not a HS coach like Cabbage, so take my opinion with a large dose of salt.  8 of the most successful teams in MLB are playing right now. Why not watch those guys and see how  many finish their swing with one hand on the bat?  I'm thinking you'll see that the great majority finish with 2 hands on. Of those few that take the top hand off, I think you'll see that it stays on at least until they extend through the ball -- IOW keep the top hand on past the point where the end of the bat is facing the pitcher.

cabbagedad posted:

I'll be curious to hear other responses.   The top hand is a big part of the equation.  In order to maximize bat speed and power, it must be fully engaged through the contact zone.  For most, a good gage to measure that is where the top hand ends up at the finish of the swing.  If it ends up at least up near the shoulder of the bottom hand,  then top hand release was not too early.  If it ends up low and across the mid-section, this is often an indication that release was early and the hitter didn't stay connected long enough.   

Beyond that, it comes down to preference, swing type, flexibility and second half extension.  Some keep both hands on, some release the top hand.  Also, it is often a result of pitch location. 

Often, when I am working with some of our hitters in the cage, I will ask that they keep both hands on the bat.  This may be because I am seeing early release or because I am seeing the swing get long too early or pulling off the ball early or it is a balance issue.  Once the issue is resolved,  I am OK with them going back to top hand release, as long as it isn't early and doesn't cause re-introduction of the initially perceived problem.

I agree with the variables as to why the top hand could come off. I want to keep 2 hands on the bat, but the one handed follow through just happens. 

JCG posted:

I'm just a dad and former Little League coach, not a HS coach like Cabbage, so take my opinion with a large dose of salt.  8 of the most successful teams in MLB are playing right now. Why not watch those guys and see how  many finish their swing with one hand on the bat?  I'm thinking you'll see that the great majority finish with 2 hands on. Of those few that take the top hand off, I think you'll see that it stays on at least until they extend through the ball -- IOW keep the top hand on past the point where the end of the bat is facing the pitcher.

I want to have a 2 handed follow through, just something I will work on. Got a tournament this weekend.  Will try to get video then. 

Wesleythecacther posted:

 Been having a debate about this for a while with my dad, as I have now been in the habit of having a one-handed follow through. What is your opinion on the follow through after you swing? Should you have 2 hands on the bat? Does it help you hit the ball harder? Or is it okay to have a one-handed follow through?

read this article 

https://baseballrebellion.com/...ith-one-hand-or-two/

 

both can work buy don't release before you finish the turn (back shoulder points to the pitcher).

Doesn't matter after contact. Can be either way if it helps you to square it up and hit as hard as you can. You may roll over on the ball or popup if you are trying to acheive an arbitrary post contact position such as 2 hands on the bat or being balanced AFTER contact. Once the ball leaves the bat there is NOTHING more you can do to effect the outcome. So 1 or 2 hands AFTER contact is irrelevant.

2019&21 Dad posted:

Doesn't matter after contact. Can be either way if it helps you to square it up and hit as hard as you can. You may roll over on the ball or popup if you are trying to acheive an arbitrary post contact position such as 2 hands on the bat or being balanced AFTER contact. Once the ball leaves the bat there is NOTHING more you can do to effect the outcome. So 1 or 2 hands AFTER contact is irrelevant.

It's irrelevant right up to the point you hit my kid (the catcher) in the back of the head with your one hand release swing.

CaCO3Girl posted:
2019&21 Dad posted:

Doesn't matter after contact. Can be either way if it helps you to square it up and hit as hard as you can. You may roll over on the ball or popup if you are trying to acheive an arbitrary post contact position such as 2 hands on the bat or being balanced AFTER contact. Once the ball leaves the bat there is NOTHING more you can do to effect the outcome. So 1 or 2 hands AFTER contact is irrelevant.

It's irrelevant right up to the point you hit my kid (the catcher) in the back of the head with your one hand release swing.

Still irrelevant. Wouldn't make me change how I hit. Apparently not a concern for so many others who do it too.

the most meaningless discussion in baseball...it doesn't matter if you release the bat properly.

I have one who finishes with one hand and one who finishes with 2. There are mountains of videos showing awesome swings from both sides of the plate with both forms of release. nothing to see here folks.

2019&21 Dad posted:
CaCO3Girl posted:
2019&21 Dad posted:

Doesn't matter after contact. Can be either way if it helps you to square it up and hit as hard as you can. You may roll over on the ball or popup if you are trying to acheive an arbitrary post contact position such as 2 hands on the bat or being balanced AFTER contact. Once the ball leaves the bat there is NOTHING more you can do to effect the outcome. So 1 or 2 hands AFTER contact is irrelevant.

It's irrelevant right up to the point you hit my kid (the catcher) in the back of the head with your one hand release swing.

Still irrelevant. Wouldn't make me change how I hit. Apparently not a concern for so many others who do it too.

it sucks to be hit by a backswing but a catcher Needs to be Aware of that and set up properly.

maybe that is even a slight Advantage of the one handed finish.

My son is a catcher. It DOES such to be hit by a one-handed backswing. Especially by the same kid in back to back ABs. Fortunately, he wears a hockey style helmet and that's the only time he's ever been hit by a back swing. DOMINIK85: are you implying that potentially hitting a catcher with a backswing is a good thing (somehow)?

Once contact has been made the only thing that matters is get out of the box and start running.  One hand or two hands don't matter.  I like what Cabbage said about where top hand ends up and switching to two hands for drill purposes.  But once the ball is hit the swing is over and now you transition to running.

If a catcher gets hit then it's the catcher's fault for being too close.  I learned that back in the day when my throwing elbow got drilled by a bat on a follow through.

coach2709 posted:

Once contact has been made the only thing that matters is get out of the box and start running.  One hand or two hands don't matter.  I like what Cabbage said about where top hand ends up and switching to two hands for drill purposes.  But once the ball is hit the swing is over and now you transition to running.

If a catcher gets hit then it's the catcher's fault for being too close.  I learned that back in the day when my throwing elbow got drilled by a bat on a follow through.

As a catcher I don't care, it's a risk that I take. As a rule of thumb i will take my glove hand it fits a Righ handed batter and make sure my glove is 2 inches or so from his leg, then I should be good. But sometimes it just happens and I get hit. Doesn't matter, just shake it off and act like it doesn't happen, shows how tough you are anyways. 

old_school posted:

the most meaningless discussion in baseball...it doesn't matter if you release the bat properly.

I have one who finishes with one hand and one who finishes with 2. There are mountains of videos showing awesome swings from both sides of the plate with both forms of release. nothing to see here folks.

But it doesn't matter when the hand is released. If it is released too early then you are not getting your money's worth on the swing, that's what I've learned from other people's comments. 

If I may.... The key to understanding is this. What is critical is the drive Thru the ball and not to the ball. Once a hitter drives through the ball with one palm up and one Palm down the wrist will roll over and the ball is gone! Hold on or let go... The torque of the body will determine it naturally!

Charlie Lau - What the critics failed to understand was that the hitter released his top hand only after making contact with the ball. A hitter could actually extend the bat further with one hand, rather than holding onto the bat with both hands. To Lau’s way of thinking, extension mattered more than gripping the bat with two hands after the fact. 

You will see batters that typically keep two hands on the bat alter that when having to extend for an outside pitch or for a pitch they misjudged.

If your going to let go, just make sure you are releasing your "TOP" hand.  Good luck!

LL, 17 and under, poor hitters should follow through with both hands to make sure they make good contact and maintain bat speed through contact.  It's irrelevant for elite hitters though.  I have a habit of holding onto the bat and then having to swing it around again to drop it after making contact, so letting go of the top hand after contact allows me to get to 1st faster.  

coach2709 posted:

Once contact has been made the only thing that matters is get out of the box and start running.  One hand or two hands don't matter.  I like what Cabbage said about where top hand ends up and switching to two hands for drill purposes.  But once the ball is hit the swing is over and now you transition to running.

If a catcher gets hit then it's the catcher's fault for being too close.  I learned that back in the day when my throwing elbow got drilled by a bat on a follow through.

My son, 14u, has been hit twice in the back of the head. Twice the batters have been called out instantly and both team coaches came running for him. In order to avoid it he would have had to have been at least 6 feet behind the plate, that's just not feasible.  

My hope is as the kids get older they can swing one handed without hitting the catcher.

CaCO3Girl posted:
coach2709 posted:

Once contact has been made the only thing that matters is get out of the box and start running.  One hand or two hands don't matter.  I like what Cabbage said about where top hand ends up and switching to two hands for drill purposes.  But once the ball is hit the swing is over and now you transition to running.

If a catcher gets hit then it's the catcher's fault for being too close.  I learned that back in the day when my throwing elbow got drilled by a bat on a follow through.

My son, 14u, has been hit twice in the back of the head. Twice the batters have been called out instantly and both team coaches came running for him. In order to avoid it he would have had to have been at least 6 feet behind the plate, that's just not feasible.  

My hope is as the kids get older they can swing one handed without hitting the catcher.

Is he getting hit on the front end of the swing or the follow through?  Getting hit in the back of the head I could see horrible swings where they throw the barrel out then try to bring it through the zone which could get him.  If it's on the backswing I would have to see it to figure out what's going on.

It does get better as he gets older......thankfully

coach2709 posted:
CaCO3Girl posted:
coach2709 posted:

Once contact has been made the only thing that matters is get out of the box and start running.  One hand or two hands don't matter.  I like what Cabbage said about where top hand ends up and switching to two hands for drill purposes.  But once the ball is hit the swing is over and now you transition to running.

If a catcher gets hit then it's the catcher's fault for being too close.  I learned that back in the day when my throwing elbow got drilled by a bat on a follow through.

My son, 14u, has been hit twice in the back of the head. Twice the batters have been called out instantly and both team coaches came running for him. In order to avoid it he would have had to have been at least 6 feet behind the plate, that's just not feasible.  

My hope is as the kids get older they can swing one handed without hitting the catcher.

Is he getting hit on the front end of the swing or the follow through?  Getting hit in the back of the head I could see horrible swings where they throw the barrel out then try to bring it through the zone which could get him.  If it's on the backswing I would have to see it to figure out what's going on.

It does get better as he gets older......thankfully

RHB swings at an upward angle let's go with right hand, bat/arm continue motion as bat starts descending, body does a nearly full twist and the bat (while arm is fully extended) hits my son on the back of the head, HARD.

CaCO3Girl posted:
coach2709 posted:
CaCO3Girl posted:
coach2709 posted:

Once contact has been made the only thing that matters is get out of the box and start running.  One hand or two hands don't matter.  I like what Cabbage said about where top hand ends up and switching to two hands for drill purposes.  But once the ball is hit the swing is over and now you transition to running.

If a catcher gets hit then it's the catcher's fault for being too close.  I learned that back in the day when my throwing elbow got drilled by a bat on a follow through.

My son, 14u, has been hit twice in the back of the head. Twice the batters have been called out instantly and both team coaches came running for him. In order to avoid it he would have had to have been at least 6 feet behind the plate, that's just not feasible.  

My hope is as the kids get older they can swing one handed without hitting the catcher.

Is he getting hit on the front end of the swing or the follow through?  Getting hit in the back of the head I could see horrible swings where they throw the barrel out then try to bring it through the zone which could get him.  If it's on the backswing I would have to see it to figure out what's going on.

It does get better as he gets older......thankfully

RHB swings at an upward angle let's go with right hand, bat/arm continue motion as bat starts descending, body does a nearly full twist and the bat (while arm is fully extended) hits my son on the back of the head, HARD.

This is an unfortunate situation that happens at times for catchers (that's me). I have gotten hit by a bat in the chest, the kid threw the bat backwards after the swing, and it hit me across the chest and helmet, he was called out by the umpire.

I guess I look at it in simpler terms...why take your top hand off?  What is the purpose/benefit behind it?

When I work with my hitters I always encourage them to leave the top hand on all the way through the swing.  The main reason is in watching video of them swinging there seemed to be a lot of early release of the hand, especially on off speed pitches.  It was hard for some of them to work fight the urge to finish one-handed and some never did, but the ones that did work on it found better barrel control and more power.

Coach_TV posted:

I guess I look at it in simpler terms...why take your top hand off?  What is the purpose/benefit behind it?

When I work with my hitters I always encourage them to leave the top hand on all the way through the swing.  The main reason is in watching video of them swinging there seemed to be a lot of early release of the hand, especially on off speed pitches.  It was hard for some of them to work fight the urge to finish one-handed and some never did, but the ones that did work on it found better barrel control and more power.

I think there is a massive amount of evidence that shows the bolded to be incorrect, either method can be very good. I don't doubt your observations but I would guess it is a matter of the sample size being too small.

 

old_school posted:
 but I would guess it is a matter of the sample size being too small.

 

Yes it was a small sample size... like I said it was the hitters I worked with; which is 10-12 players who are 12 or 13...BUT, when I had a ball on the tee and had them swing to contact and stop, while holding the bat right by the ball take their top hand off and watch the barrel drop below the ball.  The bat's they used were 30-32 inches and 22-26 oz's so nothing to heavy for 12 and 13 yr olds.

I asked them all if they could be 100% sure they wouldn't take the top hand off until well past POC and of course they couldn't.

And to further demonstrate the point I had use a lighter bat and swing one handed.  Load with two hands... start the swing and take the top hand off, quite a few of them popped the ball up because the barrel dropped.  Did the same thing only this time took the bottom hand off and no barrel drop and most of them hit the ball on a line.

Again.. this is just my observation with the hitters on my son's team, not saying it is 100% correct of anything.  I'm sure there is some value in a one handed swing...I just haven't seen it with the players I work with.

The release is after the ball is struck. The vast majority of hitters release the top hand after contact. Some sooner than others. Leaving two hands on the bat after contact throughout the swing serves no useful purpose. In fact it can be detrimental to the hitter. Young hitters can have a tendency to release too early. They also can have a tendency to focus so hard on leaving two hands on the bat they actually limit their ability to have any extension in their swing. You can use Q's to help players stay on the ball longer by saying leave two hands on the bat understanding that at some point the top hand will release.

I challenge any of you to watch college or professional hitters "mature accomplished" hitters and watch what happens to the top hand after they have hit the baseball. Stand up and take a swing with your hands with an imaginary bat in your hands. Drive through the baseball keeping your head still and extending through the ball. What happens to your top hand? What happens to your head and shoulders when you intentionally leave the top hand on? Now imaging a ball on the outer half with that swing?

 

 

Coach_May posted:

The release is after the ball is struck. The vast majority of hitters release the top hand after contact. Some sooner than others. Leaving two hands on the bat after contact throughout the swing serves no useful purpose. In fact it can be detrimental to the hitter. Young hitters can have a tendency to release too early. They also can have a tendency to focus so hard on leaving two hands on the bat they actually limit their ability to have any extension in their swing. You can use Q's to help players stay on the ball longer by saying leave two hands on the bat understanding that at some point the top hand will release.

I challenge any of you to watch college or professional hitters "mature accomplished" hitters and watch what happens to the top hand after they have hit the baseball. Stand up and take a swing with your hands with an imaginary bat in your hands. Drive through the baseball keeping your head still and extending through the ball. What happens to your top hand? What happens to your head and shoulders when you intentionally leave the top hand on? Now imaging a ball on the outer half with that swing?

 

 

Agree here as I was taught and subsequently, taught kids to get the top hand through the pitcher and after that it doesn't matter if one or two hands are on the bat. 

Steve A. posted:

Releasing the top hand after contact allows for the head to remain "down" on the point of contact. This is why Charlie Lau was an advocate of the top hand release. Look at George Brett's swing.

That makes no sense at all.  How can something that happens after contact effect something that happened before?

It may be better to release, it may not, but that's not the argument for it.

I don't argue hitting mechanics, but can't help but point out faulty logic.

The head should remain down "at" contact, not "before" contact. Go get a bat & swing at some balls off a tee. Hold on with both hands & finish & try to keep your head down at contact & a bit after contact (this is what the best do, just look at some video). Now do the same thing & release the top hand "after" contact & see if it does not feel free & easy in comparison. After this experiment, read Lau's book "The Art of Hitting .300" in its entirety & then write his estate a letter telling them how faulty his logic was. You can also CC George Brett & Rod Carew.

George who?

hank aaron

Steve A, you misunderstand me.  I don't know, care or otherwise about one hand finish or two.  But something that happens after doesn't effect what happened before.  If you tell me the swing thought/mechanics/Muscle memory of releasing the top hand helps a hitter keep the bat in the zone longer helps in some way, ok.  If you tell me the opposite, ok on that too.

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