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17yr old RHP who locates  better than most. Has four legit pitches with good movement and throws strikes. The problem is velocity is only mid 80s. Perfect game has him at 86 that was pre UCL repair surgery . He is eight months out and throwing low to mid eighties. Completing his junior year and about to start travel ball in Ga. from a recruiting stand point where does this pitcher fit in ?? All advice welcome....thank you

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@wanna b posted:

17yr old RHP who locates  better than most. Has four legit pitches with good movement and throws strikes. The problem is velocity is only mid 80s. Perfect game has him at 86 that was pre UCL repair surgery . He is eight months out and throwing low to mid eighties. Completing his junior year and about to start travel ball in Ga. from a recruiting stand point where does this pitcher fit in ?? All advice welcome....thank you

If he throws strikes and gets players out, that probably will determine where he fits in from interest of those watching, plus academic profile.  Make sure coaches know he had UCL repair. Don't rule out JUCO interest.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Ok, I'll bite.  I'm going to refer back to my formula...recruited = passion + skill + exposure + persistence + luck.

In the back of my mind, I'm asking these questions:   What is it that separates your son from others?  Who will he be in front of this summer?   Which colleges are currently interested?  What kind of student is he?  Who is helping him get to the next level?  What does he want to do when he graduates high school or college?

I assume your son is interested in playing at the next level.  Your son needs a plan, and needs it now.   Sit down with your son and map out the next 5 years in terms of academics, athletics and finances.  Discuss what he wants to do when he graduates, and the path you are going to take to get there.  Then begin making a long list of colleges that have his major, location, baseball and all the things important to him.   In general terms, as a rising senior there aren't going to be many scholarship options with D1 or D2, you're only option there would be to walk-on without a scholarship which is very risky.   So, that leaves, D3, JUCO and NAIA schools.   At a high level, that is where I'd spend my time if he wants to play baseball at the next level.  So, this is something he should have been doing months ago, but I suspect the injury played a part in that.  It wouldn't hurt to have a travel coach or high school coach reach out on his behalf as well.   

So, my youngest son was in a very similar position as your son.  He was throwing mid-80s and touching 87-88 as a high school junior, but he only had 2 plus pitches (two seam fastball and curve) and an okay 3rd pitch (change-up).  There were a few ODAC (D3 in Virginia) schools and a couple others offering him roster spots.  Then he tore his UCL in August before his high school senior year started.   He was devastated.   The recruiting phone stopped ringing.   I know this injury was very disappointing for your son (and family) but he has an opportunity to recover and find a program if he gets the right exposure strategy in front of the right recruiters.   He's going to have to separate himself with his performance and any other asset he brings to the table.   I'd strongly consider travel baseball plus any individual showcases where he can stand out from the crowd.

Good luck!

Last edited by fenwaysouth

I’m a year ahead of you. My $.02.

Spend the summer with a safe get-big program that includes a nutrition program. This does three things: He gets big, he gets to talk to coaches about his gains and commitment, and he grinds. Maybe learns stuff about what to eat. You didn’t mention his size — whether he is shorter or taller he can get bigger/stronger.

You didn’t mention if 3.8 is an unweighted GPA, the weighted GPA doesn’t necessarily matter to programs.

Juco might not be the right choice for him, but don’t overlook it. For someone who is prioritizing playing time+development, there are great Juco programs. Coaches are more accessible, too. Especially with the injury, you want a coach who gets your son’s situation.

He belongs at the best academic college he can get into regardless of level. His future past college won’t be in baseball. Given his GPA he should be looking for an academic opportunity most likely to open doors post graduation. Use baseball to get into a college that might otherwise not accept him.

This past week I sat through a graduation that was at his 2nd stop. I watched him go from a very unhappy freshman to young man in cap and gown (he actually steamed it and it didn't look terrible) with his buddies from the team and the others with huge hugs, drinks, and a few tears...just a find a school he will be happy at where he can play ball. Hell i would advise go down a level from what might be possible and be a rock star. The level is totally unimportant if is competitive.

I was concerned when he decided to transfer and it ended up being an outstanding choice for him, the only thing i would have changed is getting it right from the start. The stress levels felt by kids and parents over the level of play is amazing, not needed and is honestly dumb...but then again looking back it is always easy - I did it as well.

@RJM posted:

He belongs at the best academic college he can get into regardless of level. His future past college won’t be in baseball. Given his GPA he should be looking for an academic opportunity most likely to open doors post graduation. Use baseball to get into a college that might otherwise not accept him.

Well said, i've seen plenty of D1 pitchers who live in the 80s and have multiple pitches and can throw strikes. That situation applies across all levels of baseball. HA or best academic school sounds like the best way to get a great education and play baseball.

Height and weight?  Not a deciding factor, but 6'4+ throwing low-mid 80's will get a lot more looks than 5-10 to 6' throwing the same.  As a HS junior my son was 5'10 (maybe) and about 150.  He was hitting 90 pretty regularly.  The summer after his junior year he was on one of the top 17U programs in Ohio.  They would start a 6'6 lefty that was getting looks from all over the midwest/east coast.  He was 90-91 at best....but he was 6'6.  He regularly had 30-40 coaches watching him.   Son would come in in relief to start the 5th.  He was lucky if 10 of those coaches stayed even long enough to see him warm up...and again, he was 88-90 on most days.  He ended up at a mid-major 45 miles from home that saw him throw exactly one time before having him in for a visit....then one more inning the day after the visit before getting an offer.   If he had been 6'3 instead of 5'10 who knows where he would have ended up.

@Shoveit4Ks posted:

Well said, i've seen plenty of D1 pitchers who live in the 80s and have multiple pitches and can throw strikes. That situation applies across all levels of baseball. HA or best academic school sounds like the best way to get a great education and play baseball.

How long ago was this? Lol. I’m all for it as I personally feel velo is wildly overrated today, but with the showcase, pg, etc craze...it’s all that ever is discussed. Even announcers are focused on it routinely. All I ever hear consistently in D1 is 90 and above for fastballs

How long ago was this? Lol. I’m all for it as I personally feel velo is wildly overrated today, but with the showcase, pg, etc craze...it’s all that ever is discussed. Even announcers are focused on it routinely. All I ever hear consistently in D1 is 90 and above for fastballs

The first 3 years between '16 and '18 when son played P5 college ball, the starters primarily sat mid to high 80's and touched 90. You wanted to get through the lineup 3 times requiring a lot more pitching than just velo. BP guys were the 90 and up group. His team was ranked within the top ten at some point during the year, all 3 years. They averaged around 10th in the country in recruiting classes as well during his time there.

There were starters who were 90 and up on the FB and if they were LHP, it was more rare.  This isn't a blanket statement of course, as we faced several top programs that ran guys out who were all above 90 and had great secondary pitches. If a HC could get those, life gets easier but I think those guys are primarily at the top-level programs in the country.

Mid majors or lower are more likely in the OP's range depending on the program and success.

Last edited by Shoveit4Ks

There is more emphasis on velocity now than I can ever remember. As a result there are way too many young players (and coaches) that are only focused on trying to throw hard. There is not enough focus on learning how to command the baseball - or on good throwing mechanics. All of which is bad for the game. Nobody wants to watch a bunch of walks with a strikeout mixed in every now and then.

Son plays on #4 team in nation.  He has thrown 38.1 innings and has hit 90 a dozen times and 91 1 time that I know of in a game.  Can be 92-93 but doesn't.  He has 2.5 era with 35K's and 2 walks with one being intentional four pitch hope he swings at it walk.  We have probably 4 of our top 7 that do not get above 90 consistently.  I have preached on here before that you do not have to be able to throw 95 to pitch in P5 you just have to have good stuff and THROW STRIKES.  People do not understand why some of our big arms don't get more innings and it is because our coaching staff is adamant that pitchers throw strikes with very limited walks.

But there are also coaches that won't consider you unless you throw 95.  I could name the ones who told my son that he could not compete in SEC with his speed, even from the left side.  He has had very good success against the ones he has faced so far.  Know what the coaching staff is looking for and don't beat your head against the wall.  You can prove them wrong when you are wearing the other jersey and beating them.

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