In the past, my son has played for teams with excellent coaches but where the teams were short on talent.  Recently, he switched to a team that was extremely talented and successful.  But, the coaches have a different way of interacting with the players.

My son is the type of kid who likes to talk and ask questions.  With his old team, he was always engaged with his coaches, on and off the field, at almost any time.  It could be anything – swing mechanics, game strategy, base out situations, count philosophies – you name it.  The kid just wants to learn as much as possible and understand what works, what doesn’t, why things are done and not done, etc.  Again, the old coaches were great with this matter.  Literally, he could text his coach with a hitting question at 11 PM on a Thursday and the guy was replying right back to him.  These coaches were/are teachers of the game and they welcome these interactions.

But, the teams weren’t high level and he was missing a lot of experience and exposure opportunities because the old team wasn’t capable of being “out there.”  And, the few times they tried to be out there, they usually got slaughtered.   It’s much different with the new team.  Tons of talent.  They win – and they win against tough competition.  Sincerely, the opportunity to play with this new team on big stages and in big games against high level talent has been a tremendous experience. 

The issue is that the current coaches are 180 degrees from his old coaches.  They don’t like questions.  And, they are not engaging.  They will never answer a text from a player.  And, if a player asks a question at a practice or game, the answer is often “Why are you bothering me with this?”

This all said, my son wants to move to another team where he thinks it will be the best of both worlds – a better team (than his old one) and one were the coaches were more like his old ones.  (Whether or not the grass is actually greener is TBD.)

Since he’s the player, in my mind, this is his decision.  But, part of me is wondering if this will be a good thing?  Is this something that you switch team for?  Are players better served learning how to deal with the coach who doesn’t want to be bothered?  (And, then they find another resource for their questions and discussions.) Or, is this indeed a deal breaker where you should make a move to be with a coach who is more open, available, etc.?

Original Post

It's great that he has had the good fortune of being in both situations.  There is much to be learned within both and there is much to be learned by being exposed to the two very different settings.  How old is he?  Where is he in the recruiting process?   Does he know yet what pool he will likely be swimming in (D1, D3, etc.)?  Is there some indication that the "best of both worlds" option is viable in your area?

Did your son have a coach or mentor who encouraged the questioning? We're in a small area and were lucky in that son formed a strong bond with his youth coach and maintained that even after he moved to HS and I know they still talk now that he's in college, and that all of the coaches were open to that.

Is there someone in your son's life who can provide that option?

Scotty Doesn't Know posted:

In the past, my son has played for teams with excellent coaches but where the teams were short on talent.  Recently, he switched to a team that was extremely talented and successful.  But, the coaches have a different way of interacting with the players.

My son is the type of kid who likes to talk and ask questions.  With his old team, he was always engaged with his coaches, on and off the field, at almost any time.  It could be anything – swing mechanics, game strategy, base out situations, count philosophies – you name it.  The kid just wants to learn as much as possible and understand what works, what doesn’t, why things are done and not done, etc.  Again, the old coaches were great with this matter.  Literally, he could text his coach with a hitting question at 11 PM on a Thursday and the guy was replying right back to him.  These coaches were/are teachers of the game and they welcome these interactions.

But, the teams weren’t high level and he was missing a lot of experience and exposure opportunities because the old team wasn’t capable of being “out there.”  And, the few times they tried to be out there, they usually got slaughtered.   It’s much different with the new team.  Tons of talent.  They win – and they win against tough competition.  Sincerely, the opportunity to play with this new team on big stages and in big games against high level talent has been a tremendous experience. 

The issue is that the current coaches are 180 degrees from his old coaches.  They don’t like questions.  And, they are not engaging.  They will never answer a text from a player.  And, if a player asks a question at a practice or game, the answer is often “Why are you bothering me with this?”

This all said, my son wants to move to another team where he thinks it will be the best of both worlds – a better team (than his old one) and one were the coaches were more like his old ones.  (Whether or not the grass is actually greener is TBD.)

Since he’s the player, in my mind, this is his decision.  But, part of me is wondering if this will be a good thing?  Is this something that you switch team for?  Are players better served learning how to deal with the coach who doesn’t want to be bothered?  (And, then they find another resource for their questions and discussions.) Or, is this indeed a deal breaker where you should make a move to be with a coach who is more open, available, etc.?

Your son should ask the organization the following question:

I'm interested in playing college baseball, where do you see me playing?  This open endedg question will provide you some insights as to how they perceive your son.

If he is in their development plan, then he should ask for a plan. The plan should have some milestones and measurables.

If there is no development plan, find a team that can provide those services.  Secondly, do a showcase or two and some camps.

I've heard the headstart camps are very good. There is a lot of information on this forum to help out.

Also look at keepplayingbaseball.org

Regards.

CollegebaseballInsights posted:
Scotty Doesn't Know posted:

In the past, my son has played for teams with excellent coaches but where the teams were short on talent.  Recently, he switched to a team that was extremely talented and successful.  But, the coaches have a different way of interacting with the players.

My son is the type of kid who likes to talk and ask questions.  With his old team, he was always engaged with his coaches, on and off the field, at almost any time.  It could be anything – swing mechanics, game strategy, base out situations, count philosophies – you name it.  The kid just wants to learn as much as possible and understand what works, what doesn’t, why things are done and not done, etc.  Again, the old coaches were great with this matter.  Literally, he could text his coach with a hitting question at 11 PM on a Thursday and the guy was replying right back to him.  These coaches were/are teachers of the game and they welcome these interactions.

But, the teams weren’t high level and he was missing a lot of experience and exposure opportunities because the old team wasn’t capable of being “out there.”  And, the few times they tried to be out there, they usually got slaughtered.   It’s much different with the new team.  Tons of talent.  They win – and they win against tough competition.  Sincerely, the opportunity to play with this new team on big stages and in big games against high level talent has been a tremendous experience. 

The issue is that the current coaches are 180 degrees from his old coaches.  They don’t like questions.  And, they are not engaging.  They will never answer a text from a player.  And, if a player asks a question at a practice or game, the answer is often “Why are you bothering me with this?”

This all said, my son wants to move to another team where he thinks it will be the best of both worlds – a better team (than his old one) and one were the coaches were more like his old ones.  (Whether or not the grass is actually greener is TBD.)

Since he’s the player, in my mind, this is his decision.  But, part of me is wondering if this will be a good thing?  Is this something that you switch team for?  Are players better served learning how to deal with the coach who doesn’t want to be bothered?  (And, then they find another resource for their questions and discussions.) Or, is this indeed a deal breaker where you should make a move to be with a coach who is more open, available, etc.?

Your son should ask the organization the following question:

I'm interested in playing college baseball, where do you see me playing?  This open endedg question will provide you some insights as to how they perceive your son.

If he is in their development plan, then he should ask for a plan. The plan should have some milestones and measurables.

If there is no development plan, find a team that can provide those services.  Secondly, do a showcase or two and some camps.

I've heard the headstart camps are very good. There is a lot of information on this forum to help out.

Also look at keepplayingbaseball.org

Regards.

How does this apply to the problem of a coach who interacts with the players?  I have found that my sons had great interaction with their coaches at every level they have played but on task questions.  Most high level coaches are not there to interact about trivial questions.  They expect their players to show up being able to handle the common stuff.  They may help figure out problems in a swing or a pitch but not the simple things.  Don't know if this is the case or not?  They are usually very busy guys who are about getting guys seen and doing the background stuff.  A coach who will not interact with the players at all is not a good one but most coaches I know at all levels other than rec ball coaches are not good at the barrage of questions that some kids like to ask.  Not saying your kid is one of them but it seems to lead that way.  Most coaches have lives and don't want to answer trivial questions at all hours of the day and night.  They will answer the important ones but not just to talk. 

My sons were talkers and still have great relationships with coaches but it was game stuff and not after hours stuff.  Good luck.  The best way to find that guy is to let your son spend a little time with the prospective coach and see how he interacts.

What kinds of questions is your son wanting the coach to answer?  the ones you talked about were coaching situations and most coaches don't want to answer a kid's continual questions on why he does/doesn't do something.

Trying to answer all the questions.

He's a sophomore. If he continues the way he's going he will be at a small D1 or a really good D3.  (One D2 already told him that they will probably make him an offer next summer. But it's a small and local D2.)

He thinks he's found the best of both worlds for a summer squad. Team and coach comes recommended. And the coach has been recruiting him. But it's a haul from where we live.

He still talks to his old coaches. They like him and want him to do well. And, I'm sure they are thinking that they would love to find a way to get him back.

He's done some college camps and a couple of showcases. He did very well at his last showcase and I think that's why this new coach is trying to recruit him.

As far as the types of questions, it's mostly on technique, how to get better, and understanding the why behind what he's being as to do.

Thank you to everyone who replied.

PitchingFan posted:
CollegebaseballInsights posted:
Scotty Doesn't Know posted:

In the past, my son has played for teams with excellent coaches but where the teams were short on talent.  Recently, he switched to a team that was extremely talented and successful.  But, the coaches have a different way of interacting with the players.

My son is the type of kid who likes to talk and ask questions.  With his old team, he was always engaged with his coaches, on and off the field, at almost any time.  It could be anything – swing mechanics, game strategy, base out situations, count philosophies – you name it.  The kid just wants to learn as much as possible and understand what works, what doesn’t, why things are done and not done, etc.  Again, the old coaches were great with this matter.  Literally, he could text his coach with a hitting question at 11 PM on a Thursday and the guy was replying right back to him.  These coaches were/are teachers of the game and they welcome these interactions.

But, the teams weren’t high level and he was missing a lot of experience and exposure opportunities because the old team wasn’t capable of being “out there.”  And, the few times they tried to be out there, they usually got slaughtered.   It’s much different with the new team.  Tons of talent.  They win – and they win against tough competition.  Sincerely, the opportunity to play with this new team on big stages and in big games against high level talent has been a tremendous experience. 

The issue is that the current coaches are 180 degrees from his old coaches.  They don’t like questions.  And, they are not engaging.  They will never answer a text from a player.  And, if a player asks a question at a practice or game, the answer is often “Why are you bothering me with this?”

This all said, my son wants to move to another team where he thinks it will be the best of both worlds – a better team (than his old one) and one were the coaches were more like his old ones.  (Whether or not the grass is actually greener is TBD.)

Since he’s the player, in my mind, this is his decision.  But, part of me is wondering if this will be a good thing?  Is this something that you switch team for?  Are players better served learning how to deal with the coach who doesn’t want to be bothered?  (And, then they find another resource for their questions and discussions.) Or, is this indeed a deal breaker where you should make a move to be with a coach who is more open, available, etc.?

Your son should ask the organization the following question:

I'm interested in playing college baseball, where do you see me playing?  This open endedg question will provide you some insights as to how they perceive your son.

If he is in their development plan, then he should ask for a plan. The plan should have some milestones and measurables.

If there is no development plan, find a team that can provide those services.  Secondly, do a showcase or two and some camps.

I've heard the headstart camps are very good. There is a lot of information on this forum to help out.

Also look at keepplayingbaseball.org

Regards.

How does this apply to the problem of a coach who interacts with the players?  I have found that my sons had great interaction with their coaches at every level they have played but on task questions.  Most high level coaches are not there to interact about trivial questions.  They expect their players to show up being able to handle the common stuff.  They may help figure out problems in a swing or a pitch but not the simple things.  Don't know if this is the case or not?  They are usually very busy guys who are about getting guys seen and doing the background stuff.  A coach who will not interact with the players at all is not a good one but most coaches I know at all levels other than rec ball coaches are not good at the barrage of questions that some kids like to ask.  Not saying your kid is one of them but it seems to lead that way.  Most coaches have lives and don't want to answer trivial questions at all hours of the day and night.  They will answer the important ones but not just to talk. 

My sons were talkers and still have great relationships with coaches but it was game stuff and not after hours stuff.  Good luck.  The best way to find that guy is to let your son spend a little time with the prospective coach and see how he interacts.

What kinds of questions is your son wanting the coach to answer?  the ones you talked about were coaching situations and most coaches don't want to answer a kid's continual questions on why he does/doesn't do something.

Misread. 

KISS method. 

Sophomore in high school should keep it simple:

Note, academy teams might have 2 to 3 teams per level, thus 1:1 guidance counseling perspective is not feasible.

If your son likes the more 1:1 relationship, then the academy teams might not be the appropriate place. 

More self correction and figure it out vs hand holding.

At this point your son is not old enough or mature enough to choose a team on his own. You need to make the decision for him. I will catch some heat for that but as long as you are paying for it and unless you have never played/have no idea how baseball works then it is your call. Kids think about how much they like something not what certain programs offer, what others don't, how much they travel, cost, etc. 

That being said this is around the age where development tapers off and coaches start coaching to win with what they have and putting players in a position to be recruited. Most guys have their own hitting/pitching coaches at this point and it really isn't worth it for these guys to get involved in your son's approach. Plus they can charge on their own for private lessons. 

I will go as far to say Team A is bad for your son. You don't need to be the best player on the team. A weak roster means nobody is challenging him, a weak schedule means he isn't seeing quality competition regularly. As a parent you need to put your kid in a position where he is uncomfortable and has to perform - even if it results in failure as he will learn. Quality reps and competition against superior competition is just as important as having quality coaches who care. I don't know if team B is the answer, maybe you can find another solid team with more personality but Team A will just hold him back as a player and competitor. Stick with Team B until a better opportunity comes up. 

It’s tough, let me tell you. There are great coaches out there who parents love to see their kids with because the coaches are professional and approachable, and sometimes those coaches attract highly competitive players, I know that was our case. Unfortunately, as in your situation, in the high school years families will see other kids getting recruiting action in other clubs and figure that is where they need to be. So does everyone else and often times it doesn’t work out. That is the nature of club baseball and the recruiting process. Perhaps the new coaches don’t encourage questions because they are great recruiters but do not know the game as thoroughly? We’ve all seen teams that win win win because they just have more talent, and the coaching is t really a factor.

As a sophomore and long-time player of the game, at this point you need to be aligning yourself with the program you think will promote your son to colleges and who have either played collegiately or professionally and have the network associated with that. They will be the most helpful in promoting your son to the proper coaches at the college level. I know in my area, we have an organization that is simply unmatched in developing younger players, who seem to lose them once they hit high school for the “shiny object” teams. These “shiny object” teams are larger organizations that string along a majority of their players at the expense of funding a top level team that the players don’t pay to participate on (everyone else pays for them through their dues). Shiny object team is why everyone wants to play their, because those players are all committed to colleges and/or draft prospects. Truth be told, the main coaches of shiny object team never played professionally or even at 4-year universities, they just are able to recruit these top guys because they ride for free.

At this point, find someone you trust with real baseball credentials and who will help you with introductions to college programs. Stick with them and develop a bond so they want to help your son.

PABaseball posted:

At this point your son is not old enough or mature enough to choose a team on his own. You need to make the decision for him. I will catch some heat for that but as long as you are paying for it and unless you have never played/have no idea how baseball works then it is your call. Kids think about how much they like something not what certain programs offer, what others don't, how much they travel, cost, etc. 

That being said this is around the age where development tapers off and coaches start coaching to win with what they have and putting players in a position to be recruited. Most guys have their own hitting/pitching coaches at this point and it really isn't worth it for these guys to get involved in your son's approach. Plus they can charge on their own for private lessons. 

I will go as far to say Team A is bad for your son. You don't need to be the best player on the team. A weak roster means nobody is challenging him, a weak schedule means he isn't seeing quality competition regularly. As a parent you need to put your kid in a position where he is uncomfortable and has to perform - even if it results in failure as he will learn. Quality reps and competition against superior competition is just as important as having quality coaches who care. I don't know if team B is the answer, maybe you can find another solid team with more personality but Team A will just hold him back as a player and competitor. Stick with Team B until a better opportunity comes up. 

I agree.  As a HS Freshman, our Team A was made up of 2013/2014 players (75/25), while our Team B, was (25/75),  we went to 75% of the same tournaments.  Team A would mostly get to the Semis and Finals, whereas Team B would go to 80% of the time go to semis.  Team B issue was not have enough pitching, but we had the better athletes.  Looking forward, Team B had better success with college placement and MLB prospects. 

Thus Team B players got quality reps because they were play at level or up a level or 2, whereas Team A was mostly playing at level or below.

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