102 MPH

We had one of our guys there.  We actually "only" got a peak of 99 in the first of the 3 innings he threw.  Top of 96 after that, it was something like 9-0 after the first which he did hit a grandslam.  Actually it was his change up and the fact he didn't walk anyone that stood out the most.  Lots of highest level scouts especially from clubs with early picks.  Looks like LSU might lose him.  If he keeps throwing like this, he will be one of the first few picks, maybe even #1.

PGStaff posted:

We had one of our guys there.  We actually "only" got a peak of 99 in the first of the 3 innings he threw.  Top of 96 after that, it was something like 9-0 after the first which he did hit a grandslam.  Actually it was his change up and the fact he didn't walk anyone that stood out the most.  Lots of highest level scouts especially from clubs with early picks.  Looks like LSU might lose him.  If he keeps throwing like this, he will be one of the first few picks, maybe even #1.

If he goes top5 he certainly won't go to college (would be stupid to leave 4+ millions on the table and risk getting injured in college).

I think he certainly could end up top3 since there aren't many top bat or college pitching Options out there. I mean puk and Hansen throw hard but they are wild with command issues. if you take a raw fireballer you just might take the HS kid, since guys who draft college guys look for a polished Player.

Isn't philly known for drafting HS Players? there are Teams like the cubs under epstein or the Cards who prefer college guys but historically the phillies have drafted many HS Players in the last years. however philly also has a new front Office after last season, who knows what they will do.

18yo pitchers today are MUCH more polished coming out of high school than they were even just six to ten years ago. A kid like Pint will have had top level training and pitching development through the best programs in the country for several years by the time they hit the draft. I think you can also think of pitchers a little different than position players. If an organization gets ahold of an 18yo throwing upper nineties, they actually have a lot of time to bring him along the way they want to. You might as well let position players develop in college and get their at bats in where there is little chance that they will injured or mismanaged.

Backpick25 posted:

He was 95-98 in the first, 94-96 in the second and third, in yesterday afternoon's game.

To the OP, he is not a skinny little kid. I believe he's 6'-6" or 7" and is close to 250lbs. 

 

Yeah your way off on those measurements unless he grew 3 inches and put on 40 lbs since spring break......ha nice try!

roothog66 posted:

18yo pitchers today are MUCH more polished coming out of high school than they were even just six to ten years ago. A kid like Pint will have had top level training and pitching development through the best programs in the country for several years by the time they hit the draft. I think you can also think of pitchers a little different than position players. If an organization gets ahold of an 18yo throwing upper nineties, they actually have a lot of time to bring him along the way they want to. You might as well let position players develop in college and get their at bats in where there is little chance that they will injured or mismanaged.

Yes. They arme bigger, stronger and had Tommy John surgery.

Im not sure that it is good to push the developement earlier into the players age. Their muscles might be as big as a 20 year olds but the ligaments and bones are still developing. That puts a lot of stress not only to the ucl but also to the joints and cartilage.

roothog66 posted:

You might as well let position players develop in college and get their at bats in where there is little chance that they will injured or mismanaged.

Conversely, you might as well let high draft round position players develop in the minors and get their at bats in where this is little chance that they will be injured or mismanaged...as well as have their college tuition paid for by MLB.

The MLB scholarship plan is a very shrewd PR move. While it is a fine contribution to a kid's college fund, it by no means comes even close to paying for the cost of a college degree.

First, the money is taxable as income.

Second, by the time most HS players can use it (let's say after their initial contract expires and they are released, about five years) the cost of tuition has experienced five years of inflation, while the amount under the MLB program remains the original amount. (If a kid remains in the minors for even more and never reaches MLB, the inflation bite is even greater.)

Third, the room and board portion of the money is based upon the cheapest housing option offered at a school. So, the 24 year old player is now rooming in a quad with a bunch of 18 year olds away from home for the first time.

Fourth, while delaying college reduces the chances of finishing college for many, for some (like me and many others) it is a viable option. The trouble is, one isn't able to predict what life deals which may make attending college extremely difficult (wife, kids, perhaps)

Fifth, if a kid was accepted to an extremely high academic school, his slot will be gone. For example, Princeton will hold a slot in their class for only two years if a kid wants to detour first to pro-ball.

Sixth, as a kid moves from high A to AA, he gets a modest bonus. That bonus comes from the MLB scholarship money and reduces the amount MLB owes. It's not a lot of money, but every bit counts as every year in the minors the kid is operating at a cash flow deficit (meaning either a significant parental subsidy or chewing through that bonus money).

Seventh, the money must be used within a specific time period; that time period may be too short of a kid has begun a family and must attend college part-time because he needs to maintain a full time job to support his obligations.

(I believe the info above was correct as of the last CB agreement; if the info has changed, please correct it. I don't keep up anymore on that fine print.)

The devil is in the details. And one problem is that there are very few truly dispassionate people to weigh all the issues; all opinions received must be viewed with an eye towards that.

And none of this missive really even touches on the life that an 18 year old has for the first 2-3 years in proball. It's only nice and romantic from the outside looking in; it's a brutal business from within. 

Goosegg posted:

The MLB scholarship plan is a very shrewd PR move. While it is a fine contribution to a kid's college fund, it by no means comes even close to paying for the cost of a college degree.

First, the money is taxable as income.

Second, by the time most HS players can use it (let's say after their initial contract expires and they are released, about five years) the cost of tuition has experienced five years of inflation, while the amount under the MLB program remains the original amount. (If a kid remains in the minors for even more and never reaches MLB, the inflation bite is even greater.)

Third, the room and board portion of the money is based upon the cheapest housing option offered at a school. So, the 24 year old player is now rooming in a quad with a bunch of 18 year olds away from home for the first time.

Fourth, while delaying college reduces the chances of finishing college for many, for some (like me and many others) it is a viable option. The trouble is, one isn't able to predict what life deals which may make attending college extremely difficult (wife, kids, perhaps)

Fifth, if a kid was accepted to an extremely high academic school, his slot will be gone. For example, Princeton will hold a slot in their class for only two years if a kid wants to detour first to pro-ball.

Sixth, as a kid moves from high A to AA, he gets a modest bonus. That bonus comes from the MLB scholarship money and reduces the amount MLB owes. It's not a lot of money, but every bit counts as every year in the minors the kid is operating at a cash flow deficit (meaning either a significant parental subsidy or chewing through that bonus money).

Seventh, the money must be used within a specific time period; that time period may be too short of a kid has begun a family and must attend college part-time because he needs to maintain a full time job to support his obligations.

(I believe the info above was correct as of the last CB agreement; if the info has changed, please correct it. I don't keep up anymore on that fine print.)

The devil is in the details. And one problem is that there are very few truly dispassionate people to weigh all the issues; all opinions received must be viewed with an eye towards that.

And none of this missive really even touches on the life that an 18 year old has for the first 2-3 years in proball. It's only nice and romantic from the outside looking in; it's a brutal business from within. 

Sounds like a 50% scholly to me.

All good info.

Dominik85 posted:
roothog66 posted:

18yo pitchers today are MUCH more polished coming out of high school than they were even just six to ten years ago. A kid like Pint will have had top level training and pitching development through the best programs in the country for several years by the time they hit the draft. I think you can also think of pitchers a little different than position players. If an organization gets ahold of an 18yo throwing upper nineties, they actually have a lot of time to bring him along the way they want to. You might as well let position players develop in college and get their at bats in where there is little chance that they will injured or mismanaged.

Yes. They are bigger, stronger and had Tommy John surgery.

Im not sure that it is good to push the developement earlier into the players age. Their muscles might be as big as a 20 year olds but the ligaments and bones are still developing. That puts a lot of stress not only to the ucl but also to the joints and cartilage.

I guess that doesn't apply to Pint after what I read on pint in the "the arm" excerpt.

The article said that pint dropped the Baseball for a couple months in the winter and played Basketball and didn't attend national Showcases before he was 16.

 There is a very short baseball season in Kansas, unlike warmer areas where kids play 8-10 months a year. Pint always played for a local team and didn't venture out much until he went to Atlanta once his sophomore summer. He has not logged the innings that his peers have, there could be a lot more to come in that live arm.....I'm pulling for him all the way.

I don't know if this is still the case. There was a point in time where colleges and pro scouts preferred hard throwers from cold weather. The appeal was the odds of low mileage arms. With the development of so many indoor facilities I'm seeing cold weather kids toast their arms. So I don't know if the appeal still holds.

RJM posted:

I don't know if this is still the case. There was a point in time where colleges and pro scouts preferred hard throwers from cold weather. The appeal was the odds of low mileage arms. With the development of so many indoor facilities I'm seeing cold weather kids toast their arms. So I don't know if the appeal still holds.

That was definitely the way they operated. However, I remember reading that once and wondered if there was any actual evidence to really support the notion or if it was just one of those things that made sense as a hypothetical.

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