An "advisor" my son and I were meeting with over the holidays made a statement that "the hard slotting system is almost guaranteed to be established for the 2012 draft and has since been confirmed by several MLB scouts that have been to our home. One scout stated that "it appears there will be severe penalties associated with noncompliance, including losing draft selection positions in the following year's draft". How do you think this will impact the 2011 Draft and what changes do you anticipate for 2012
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quote:
Originally posted by Clint Taylor:
An "advisor" my son and I were meeting with over the holidays made a statement that "the hard slotting system is almost guaranteed to be established for the 2012 draft and has since been confirmed by several MLB scouts that have been to our home. One scout stated that "it appears there will be severe penalties associated with noncompliance, including losing draft selection positions in the following year's draft". How do you think this will impact the 2011 Draft and what changes do you anticipate for 2012


No matter what they (MLB) want, I am not sure it's going to happen.
What is going to happen though, is that agents and scouts are going to tell you to get the money while you can (2011) because it's not going to be there in 2012.
Remember this is a business where lots of people make lots of money and for that they will make you believe anything.

JMO.
I personally think this is being driven by the "player's union" (with owners support) because the MLB players are upset about the high $$$ being paid to a kid that is not a proven commodity and could ultimately take $$$ from the existing MLB players. According to a MLP player (Braves), he sees this being passed by the union at their meeting next December. It will be interesting to see how it will affect $$$ in each round and how it will be received. The "hard slotting" could ultimately drive more high school kids to college, which, in my opinion, would not be a bad thing.
This could have a negative affect on the advisor/agent for high school players but could be a benefit for the college player. JMO
Don't get me wrong, it's not that I do not disagree with the concept, but not sure how it can be done so that it would be fair and equitable for all, not just the few lucky ones.
I thought that what it is supposed to prevent is drafting someone in the 10th round and giving first round money (example). However, where is it written what exactly a specific round or slot is worth? Teams more of less use that premise now. I am not sure what the answer is, so that is why it's hard to see a system in place that could work and be adhered to.
Seems to me that a "hard" slotting system that had real teeth (meaning the penalties for paying over slot are a real deterrent)would benefit both the owners and the current MLB players.

For the owners, it would basically be a price fixing scheme. (And exempt from anti-trust law as they are, they could get away with it.)

For the current MLB players, it frees up owner money that they can try to bargain for in the form of free agent salaries and elements of the collective bargaining agreement, such as minimum salaries.

So they will likely attempt to put a hard slotting system in, and since it benefits both sides, my sense is that it will happen.

Are there downsides for the owners in a hard slotting system? I can't think of any. Are there disadvantages to current MLB players?
The downside is the same as the salary tax.
There is no guarantee and no oversight to the "saved"money being paid to existing players or to meet obligations to prior players.
It would be hard to imagine the players will allow this unless the money is guaranteed to be paid to the players or retiree union players.
It would be impossible to fathom owners will allow players and the union to see the books and make sure the profits are not put into ownership pockets.
Mistrust can be a beautiful thing. Eek
Not going to happen. It's a slippery slope to a salary cap, which the players don't want. Plus there's no way to verify any money saved will actually go to the players. We already saw the Pirates and Marlins keep their luxury tax revenue and not spend it on player salaries. So unless there's an iron clad verification process, there is no way this happens. More likely to see draft shortened to 25 rounds, and earlier signing deadline, as the biggest changes.
I spoke with the mlb player again today and he said the players union is behind the changes 100%. He stated because of the number of free agent signings this year that more clubs will have much less for draft signings, especially after the early rounds.
Rob, your comment on active mlb players is on target. Player stated the union would like to see more $$$ allocated to the min. salary, he did not think much would be added to the milb player's salary. There are strong feelings among mlb players that the signing bonuses have gotten out of hand for unproven high school players and is hurting the middle tier players. Interesting comments from a player who has a very nice mlb contract, probably 12 to 14m per year. He stated this could be a big help for the small and medium market mlb clubs who could use the $$$ toward acquiring a couple more elite players.
Yes, some of the owners may hold their savings but winning is very important to the owners, players, and fans; therefore, I don't anticipate many organizations using that tactic.
quote:
There are strong feelings among mlb players that the signing bonuses have gotten out of hand for unproven high school players and is hurting the middle tier players.


What do you mean by middle tier players?
What I would define as middle tier players are those signing for $2,000,000 to $3,000,000 per year, with 2-3 years guaranteed.
In 2010, Aubrey Huff was such a player.
He signed a one year for $3,000,000. One good year later he is at something like $11,000,000 per year for 2 years guaranteed.
It is hard to imagine there are 10 or so totally over paid players in the draft who will have their salaries slotted and controlled where the dollars will make any difference for middle tier players.
Most teams also have a draft budget.
If they pay player #1 a certain amount that is excessive, others down the draft number get less.
Simple fact.
The other aspect that does not truly add up is the draft controls costs. Most MLB teams are paying free agent $$$ to Latin, Asian and other players.
Finally, as all the tricks the Dodgers(well the McCourts) have played to disguise revenue and profit even from MLB, the amount of distrust should be even greater.
quote:
Originally posted by Pop Up Hitter dad:
Quote: Great point about the international draft, 16 year old foreign players getting millions of dollars and no players seem to mind that?


TPM, that's because most of the MLB players are foreign themselves.


Are most of the MLB players foreign? Someone have some stats on that, I don't know.
My statement only reflects paying 16 year olds getting millions of dollars, I don't care where they come from, that is JMO. The really big bucks that are paid out in bonus money only goes to a few, and infielddad is correct, they have budgets for drafts and no one can force any team to spend their money (or not spend it). I like the idea of the minimum salary being raised.
I don't feel sorry for the small market teams that cry broke, no one says they HAVE to pick the #1 guy, but they do, because in reality they have made some really nice money from them even before they hit the ML field.
I think a lot of resentment comes from the fact that these guys have put in time, years in milb and then MLB before they can negotiate for big bucks. The issue is that the majority most 29+ players have past their prime, they had their chance in their earlier years to make mega bucks they also dream about. They want their experience to make up for lack of exceptional talent, which is seen in many young players of today. In a way I understand that.
Foreign players will likely be included in the amateur draft, but it's still in the negotiation stages with the MLBPU and MLBO.

When someone states "take the money while you can", that statement has been going on since the 80's to be honest with you.

The number of MLB free-agents signing this year will add more players in the compensatory/sandwich pick parts of the first, second and third rounds. The slotting system has not been adhered to by all MLB teams and MLB has bent a bit to allow over paying past slot recommendations. If the MLB office, Owners and Union can agree to bonus signing limits (doubt this will ever happen) then perhaps some consistency in bonus payouts will occur, again doubtful.

Slotting imho is never going to be agreed upon as long as bonuses are publicized and there are agents.
It is not a foregone conclusion that international free agents will be included in the upcoming draft. The implementation of an international draft will be very difficult. How will a player in Japan, Cuba, or Venezuela be regulated? If there is an international draft it will most likely be limited to the Dominican Republic and a few non-relevant countries.

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