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quote:
Originally posted by Lamber:

And to all......Why did I never feel an impact between ball and bat on the hardest hits of my career? Balls that traveled 350'-375' and left the park in right or left center.




The most probable answer IMO would be that it was because you hit a baseball over the fence - not a 300 pound bag of sand.

Wink
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I don't know about bags of sand, but we used to have our hitters put their bat against a stationary object (like a post) and do isometrics for as long as possible.

They would get into power contact position and strain. We were trying to accomplish 3 things.

1. Get our hitters to find and get used to feeling the power contact position.

2. Develop strength in the exact power hitting muscles and hands.

3. Develop balance at contact.

Don't know that this technique was/is used by others, but it seemed to help our hitters a lot.
Any reasonable baseball person that saw the bag in use would understand and see the value in using for certain applications. Safety concerns would forgotten too.

Lamber has been right on through this post. The ax analogy is true and identical to what happens.

I hate that new "Lord of the Rings " sequel. It is so boring and fakey. OH, I forgot..I haven't seen it yet Big Grin
Lamber,
Did your bat come to a complete stop when you hit the ball? The fact that the bat is impacting the heavy bag and stopping almost immediately is what causes the impact on the hands. (Edited - When you feel a stinger it is due to the vibration that comes as a result of hitting the ball away from the sweet spot, when you go deep you hit the ball on the sweet spot and didn't feel the vibration. You expect the impact from hitting the ball and are used to it so when you go deep you feel it far less than when you hit the ball poorly.)

The only ways for the hands to "release" the energy when you're swinging at a heavy bag is to decelerate the bat before impact or let go of the bat before impact.

Given that I've seen kids hands badly bruised from hitting a tire too often I'd say that feeling could result in injury.

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Swingbuster,
Actually a sharp axe will stop far less abruptly than a bat hitting a heavy bag. Even so, I used to bruise my hands chopping wood. Try hacking at a tree with a dull axe and see how it feels. For the same reason hitting a bag filled with cloth such as Nikkio mentioned cushions the impact considerably since the bat stops far less abruptly.
Just a comment on the batting "bag" discussion. Here is a very simple and inexpensive hitting station to build that will also reduces the impact stress you are all concerned about......
Securely bolt a "CUT" tire vertically to a pole or heavy fencing at your player’s swing height. The tire is cut through at about the "10 o'clock position on the non-connected side of the tire. When the batter hits the tire, they get the resistance you want, but because the cut tire will "give" a little more it reduces the jarring impact that can be harmful.
(.......... but, I'm a pitcher's parent, so what do I know about batting! laugh)

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Bluedog,

Don't get me wrong, I like Mikes videos, but you don't really think the drills on Mike's videos are proprietary do you? Or original? The fence drill?

If you believe his drills are proprietary, then I guess you believe his recollections about talking to Harry Heilmann are true too?

Nick
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quote:
Originally posted by Lamber:
...Singbuster

They haven't seen the video but they can tell you that what's on it is wrong.


Lamber,

I don't need you to speak for me. You know nothing about me so stick to what you know.

After reading the followups to this post, please show me where I have even addressed the heavy bag issue.
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Lamber,

You asked: “Are you saying there is no difference in feeling (in the hands) between hitting the ball on the sweet spot with good mlb mechanics v hitting the ball on the sweet spot with average mechanics”

My answer is: Not if the average mechanics result in the same swing speed, point of contact , etc.

The bat doesn’t know who swung it, Mac, Sosa or some high school kid with terrible mechanics. If the high school kid hits the ball with a wood bat on the sweet spot with 85 MPH bat speed it will go the same distance it would if Sosa hit it at 85 MPH (assuming same pitch speed, trajectory, angle of bat to the ball, part of the ball hit, etc). The sweet spot does not react differently to different mechanics.

Now different mechanics can influence your ability to hit the sweet spot and the speed of the bat when it hits the sweet spot, but that is not the point you raised..

Nick
Lamber,
Virtually no difference. More momentum will be transferred to the ball, therefore there will be a slightly larger force on the bat. You can't be absolutely certain, without testing, how it will work out as the coefficient of restitution tends to vary slightly depending on the impact speed.

In any case, the ball doesn't weigh that much compared to the bat so it doesn't amount to that much. You probably wouldn't be able to tell the difference as long as you hit it on the sweetspot.

Now if you ask me what happens when you hit a heavy bag, which weighs orders of magnitude more than a bat, at a batspeed of 75 mph vs a batspeed of 95 mph that is a whole different story.

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