Draft Board

What does it mean to be put on "the draft board?"  If a team puts you on the draft board, is that for that team only or does it put you on some draft eligible list for all teams.  Is that list published somewhere?  Do you have to be on the draft board to be draft eligible?

Original Post

It depends on just which "draft boards" your taking about.  Each team has their own, where they have the prospects they're interested in.  MLB's is the "draft board" is the one the shows the players that have been drafted.  And then there are those speculative "draft boards" that try to guess which players will be drafted when (e.g. 1st pick, 2nd pick, 3rd pick, etc.).

 

Every player that is drafted has an ID#. So if a player doesn't have an ID# he will not be drafted.  This has been done by the MLB Scouting Bureau.

This would include any player that any MLB club has turned in for the draft.  Having an ID# doesn't guarantee that a player will be drafted.  Not having an ID# does guarantee that a player will not be drafted.  The list is not made public but most eventual draft picks will most likely know.

Often we hear people say things like our son is a 4th to 10th round draft pick.  Then we find out he isn't even on the list and will not be drafted.

The individual clubs will have their own draft board, basically the order they think the players will be picked.  Seeing that they never know which order players will be selected, they need to be ready to select their highest rated player that is still on the board.  But once again every player drafted will have an ID#.

If anyone has ever seen or listened to the actual draft, the first thing announced is the players draft ID#, i.e. Redraft 2033

Thanks PGSTAFF.  That makes perfect sense.  Son was told by a team that they were putting him on the draft board.  He was also told that made him draft eligible.  I searched online to see if I could figure out what he was talking about.  It must have to do with being assigned an ID# as you stated.

Master, a scout "turning in" a kid's name is only a first step in a long process. To be drafted, every mile of that process must be traveled. 

Literally thousands more names are turned in then are drafted. Search the threads here for information about the process; so much to learn, so many urban myths to be dispelled.

So if a player has been contacted by the MLB scouting Bureau and has provided medical information, does that mean he has an ID#? Will the player be told by someone before the draft what his ID# is?  If he's not been informed of his ID# that means he doesn't have one and won't be drafted? 

Also, if he's filled out questionnaires and medical info for several teams and taken personality tests for a couple of teams is that a good sign he might get drafted? 

DH4life posted:

So if a player has been contacted by the MLB scouting Bureau and has provided medical information, does that mean he has an ID#? Will the player be told by someone before the draft what his ID# is?  If he's not been informed of his ID# that means he doesn't have one and won't be drafted? 

Also, if he's filled out questionnaires and medical info for several teams and taken personality tests for a couple of teams is that a good sign he might get drafted? 

Yes, it's absolutely a good sign.  

I highly suspect a ID# has already been assigned.  And if you son has filled any forms from the Scouting Bureau, then I'd be pretty certain that there is an ID#.  

Now on draft day(s) it'll be wait and see what happens next. 

DH4LIFE

You won't know the ID# 

And you don't need to know it.

When and if your son's name is announced they will reference his ID# and then his real full name, position, and where he is from.

Once in a great while a player is announced twice because a team didn't realize he was already selected and off the board.

Based on your comments, it sounds like your son will be in the draft.  Scouts should have or will be doing their signability work on your son, especially if he is a potential top 10-15 rounds or better.  Though sometimes their signability work gets done without the player even realizing it.

Thank you everyone for your replies, very helpful. And in response to JOEMKTG, no meeting with scouts or home visits have happened, but son is in college so not sure the home visits are something that normally happens. Since no calls or meetings with scouts makes us think he probably won't get drafted but at least he's on the radar!

Sometimes the answers to certain questions take care of it.  When before even asking any questions, the player and parents say he is going to college even if he goes in the first round.  The scouts club thinks he is a 7th to 10th rounder at best.  The scout might ask, are you absolutely sure?  Signability is over and the scout will just finish his visit and try to make a favorable impression. The player and parents might not even know he was doing a signability assignment. File his report:  Player and parents insist on college even if first round.  Will follow up later.

I'd say something like  75% to 85% of the players drafted each year don't get calls or meetings with scouts.  So, if you son is in that group, there's no reason to think "he probably won't get drafted" when he's filling out, signing and returning forms from teams or like the attached.

Hopefully, your son won't get too stressed out about it.  If and when your son's name is called, savor the experience.  

 

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PGStaff posted:

Sometimes the answers to certain questions take care of it.  When before even asking any questions, the player and parents say he is going to college even if he goes in the first round.  The scouts club thinks he is a 7th to 10th rounder at best.  The scout might ask, are you absolutely sure?  Signability is over and the scout will just finish his visit and try to make a favorable impression. The player and parents might not even know he was doing a signability assignment. File his report:  Player and parents insist on college even if first round.  Will follow up later.

Excellent point PG.

I don't think it can be overly emphasized that for a HS player, signability is a huge issue that affects draft status.

Truman posted:

I'd say something like  75% to 85% of the players drafted each year don't get calls or meetings with scouts.  So, if you son is in that group, there's no reason to think "he probably won't get drafted" when he's filling out, signing and returning forms from teams or like the attached.

Hopefully, your son won't get too stressed out about it.  If and when your son's name is called, savor the experience.  

 

TRUMAN - Thank you, this is so encouraging. And yes, he has filled out both the MLB Scouting Bureau authorization and release and filled out questionnaires like the one you attached for several teams (including the Indians He's got finals this week so I think he's more stressed about that right now!

 

I figured that. My son's college has 4-5 players that could be drafted. 1 is projected 1-2 round, 1  - 6-15 round, other 2-3 are seniors and not sure. first 2 have been asked according to parents, last group hasn't been talked to. Fun having all the scouts around. Lots of boys getting seen

chefmike7777 posted:

would signability not be an issue for college players as well? Just trying to be educated Son not in that position.

Yes, but I'd say it's to a lesser extent.  It's different in different situations.  Like for some JUCO students it can be just as big an issue as for HS.  For a college Jr. there still a signability issue, but in more cases it's not as strong an issue as with HS.  And for college Sr's, there's almost not issue and that's why you see Sr's used as they are in the MLB Draft.

chefmike7777 posted:

I figured that. My son's college has 4-5 players that could be drafted. 1 is projected 1-2 round, 1  - 6-15 round, other 2-3 are seniors and not sure. first 2 have been asked according to parents, last group hasn't been talked to. Fun having all the scouts around. Lots of boys getting seen

If there only one thing i've learned about such "projections" it's that to take them with a very small grain of salt.    There's just no telling until it's all over.

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