Recently my son came back from a show case and was approached by a HA D3 coach during a game. And later talked to another HA D3 coach that was interested in my son and wanted my son to update on his stats every 2 weeks to keep him posted.  My son was very excited of these feedback from these college coaches. 

My son texted his school head coach about this news and it's been a week and nothing. I sent him an email saying... thanking him for teaching my son well.... no respond.   I wasn't expecting a celebration or even a phone call... just would be nice for him to respond to my son's text at least saying good job??? .. that is all....

My son's school is a D1 baseball so we have baseball through out the summer..so it's not like the coach is on vacation for the whole summer... 

Am I asking too much?  What do other school coaches say when players notify them?

Original Post

HS Coaches can run the gamut.  Many are not exactly the "atta boy" types - they see players come and go year after year and often don't get too invested in each, or are not very communicative LOL.  Many don't get involved with recruiting at all (but then sometimes take credit if a player gets an offer .  There are many many good ones who would respond - and IMO your coach should have responded (it only takes a quick congrats) -- but don't count on it.  You are not asking too much, but sometimes the Coach is busy, "not good" at email, etc.  That's the way it goes.  Hopefully your son will understand and not be upset by it.  Doesn't take anything away from the positive feedback from the HA.  Try not to let it bug you and best of luck!

First of all, CONGRATULATIONS to your son! I can think of little better than to attend a high academic college and be able to play the sport you love while there. What a terrific combination, and he's to be commended for putting himself in that position.

Suspecting that there was a better-than-average chance that my baseball-playing son might end up as a coach one day, I started early suggesting to him that he note carefully the words and behaviors of the various coaches he would have along the way. That way, he could build an ever-enlarging memory of those things to be imitated and those to be avoided once the time came for him to change the type of shoes he wore on the field.

Fortunately, he was the sort who would tend to accept his parents' advice (Even though, as a teenager, he might not always acknowledge it as being good advice!). In the process of observing, he learned some terrific traits; along with some others to shun.

As disappointing as your son's coach's lack of response might be, at least your son's learning a lesson that ought to lead him down a much more considerate path in the future when faced with similar circumstances.

All the best to him!

Just a bit of a lesson in general. While you guys are probably doing the right thing by thanking the coach for any help and informing him of baseball plans - you don't go out seeking praises and pats on the back. Yes it is nice to be told good job and have people that are also excited for you, but that is what friends and family are for. Nothing wrong with letting the coach know, but don't go searching for validation. He will be receiving it in the form of interest and eventually offers. 

That being said, most high school coaches are just teachers who played baseball. Not all were pro stars, college stars, or high school stars. In fact many don't know what they're doing all that well. I don't know the situation but there are plenty more teachers who coach than coaches who know their way around a recruiting trail. 

Maybe he is waiting for more news other than "talking" to schools. If he doesn't follow up with you/your son next time he sees him I would just chalk it up to a grumpy old coach 

Congrats to your son, and best of luck.

I'm going to err on the side that coach is unable to respond yet.   Most coaches/teachers/educators do this for a living because they want to help young people.   Give it some time.  I know many educators, and they seem to pick some crazy vacations and trips.  I could never do what they do from August to June.   I know two educators on the Appalachian Trail at this very moment, and a couple others that won grants to study abroad in another hemisphere.  Give it another week, and then try to call them (no email or text).  Leave a message if they don't answer.   Good luck.

PABaseball posted:

Just a bit of a lesson in general. While you guys are probably doing the right thing by thanking the coach for any help and informing him of baseball plans - you don't go out seeking praises and pats on the back. Yes it is nice to be told good job and have people that are also excited for you, but that is what friends and family are for. Nothing wrong with letting the coach know, but don't go searching for validation. He will be receiving it in the form of interest and eventually offers. 

That being said, most high school coaches are just teachers who played baseball. Not all were pro stars, college stars, or high school stars. In fact many don't know what they're doing all that well. I don't know the situation but there are plenty more teachers who coach than coaches who know their way around a recruiting trail. 

Maybe he is waiting for more news other than "talking" to schools. If he doesn't follow up with you/your son next time he sees him I would just chalk it up to a grumpy old coach 

"Most and "many?"  Generalize much?  Damn teachers who coach who don't know anything!  

For the OP, I was also confused when you assert or at least suggest that the HC is coaching summer ball while not mentioning whether your son is playing during the summer for him.  Coaches often have other responsibilities during the summer and so, if they get a chance to take off for a week with the family, they do.  I know that for a very long time, I coached both Legion, and Junior Legion during the summer and didn't have much of a window to vacation with my family.  Then, factor in that my daughter was playing all over the country and so, I never had much time for anything.  I don't know your situation.  I would have responded if I could. 

Now, as a softball coach, I am actively working hard to get my girls in college and so, those parents are making sure to keep me up to date and I am constantly making contacts for them.  This past senior group, I was 3 for 3.  LOL

If your son is not playing summer ball for the school, I have your answer for you as to why he did not respond.  If your son is not playing for him in the summer, he may see it as a slap in the face.  When my son played travel and school had summer ball, he always made it back to as many games as he could even though it was not required.  Coach did it for players who were not playing travel/showcase.  But it spoke volumes when son showed up.   The coach knew he was concerned about team and not just himself.

CoachB25 posted:
PABaseball posted:

That being said, most high school coaches are just teachers who played baseball. Not all were pro stars, college stars, or high school stars. In fact many don't know what they're doing all that well. I don't know the situation but there are plenty more teachers who coach than coaches who know their way around a recruiting trail. 

"Most and "many?"  Generalize much?  Damn teachers who coach who don't know anything!  

 

Never said teachers who coach don't know anything. But yes, "most" and "many". I'm sure you and plenty of others do a fine job, but for every one of you guys there are two more who just enjoy the game and the extra paycheck. How many of these guys can break down swings, pitching mechanics, velocity train, contact colleges? I'm sure they're good guys, but I stand by the comments. I would have to drive a considerable distance to find 5 coaches to can do all these things. 

It's no secret they're usually teachers. The hours don't work too well for non teachers. You're already disqualifying a considerable amount of people right there. There are more coaches who know how to run a basic practice and lineup changes than knowledgable baseball guys looking to develop, train, and improve players over a 4 year period. A lot start in February and check out when the season ends. That's not to say they don't care, but possibly that they don't know where to start. And that is not a knock on them either, but people expect a lot from their HS coaches. Not all of them can help and not all of them care. 

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