Juco Questions

I'm trying to find a list of JUCO's that have on campus housing options and havent had much success . We are most interested in schools in the midwest and midsouth/southeast.  A good baseball developement track record is also desireable.  Thank you in advance for any input or knowledge.  

Original Post

Also, be aware that JC's by design are largely community-specific/commuter schools so it is quite common that there are no campus housing options tied directly to the school.  So, most students either live at home or secure their own living arrangements off-campus.   On a related note, don't expect the traditional 4-yr college experience.  Yes, there are certainly exceptions.

 

To the best of my knowledge all Iowa JUCOs have on campus housing, typically pods or apartment style. NIACC, Southeastern CC, Iowa Western, Indian Hills - Centerville, SWCC, Marshalltown, Ellsworth, Kirkwood, DMACC, Iowa Central. They are all competitive programs that move kids on. 

GameDayToday posted:

To the best of my knowledge all Iowa JUCOs have on campus housing, typically pods or apartment style. NIACC, Southeastern CC, Iowa Western, Indian Hills - Centerville, SWCC, Marshalltown, Ellsworth, Kirkwood, DMACC, Iowa Central. They are all competitive programs that move kids on. 

Ditto for most Juco programs in Kansas, Oklahoma & Texas

I would say that nearly all the JC's in the midwest DO have housing.  IA/KS/NE/ IL.  Near bigger cities might see less housing on campus (Twin Cities is one example).  Not aware of an aggregated list of who is placing the most D1s.  Much like high school recruiting it is hard to tell who is really getting scholarships $$ versus just walking on with little chance of playing time.  

A competitive JUCO will most likely have a list of where their players have gone D1/D2/D3 NAIA/Pro prominently displayed on their website.  It is a big recruiting draw.

Also if you have a list of D1 schools that he would like to get to, check their recruiting classes to see if they have incoming JUCO players.  Many D1 colleges have strong relationships and 'feed' from certain JUCOs.

I haven't seen it posted yet, but among your prime considerations should be matching up the JUCO academic side to whatever type of school your son hopes to finish at.  Not all JUCO classes meet the criteria for 4 years school admissions and a kid can get really messed up trying to sync up two years in the community college to match what a third year would have at their destination school.  That can be a big roadblock here in California if a kid did not attend a CA community college.  I heard one parent say the further away the 4 year is from the JUCO, the more likely there is to be a class credit problem.

I don't know if it is as much in the areas you are looking at but others can weigh in.

Nonamedad posted:

I believe that JUCOs are classified as D1/D2 and D3 the same way NCAA is, D1and 2 offer scholarships and D3 doesn't.  That may tell you what you want to know. 

Correct.   Check the state laws.  Just because NJCAA says D1/D2 JuCo's can offer scholarships, some states (such as VA) prohibit JuCo's from offering scholarships.

Even though many JuCo's don't have on campus housing, many have connections with the local apartment complexes.   My son's JuCo coach matched him up with another player and we were able to find a complex for reasonable cost.

>> I heard one parent say the further away the 4 year is from the JUCO, the more likely there is to be a class credit problem.

That seems to be the way it is in our area, as the local 4-year college has a close working relationship with the local junior college and has pre-approved a range of classes that will readily transfer over. Students that transfer from junior colleges that do not have this relationship might have some troubles with the four-year college with regard to what classes are deemed equivalent.

2020-RHP-Dad posted:

>> I heard one parent say the further away the 4 year is from the JUCO, the more likely there is to be a class credit problem.

That seems to be the way it is in our area, as the local 4-year college has a close working relationship with the local junior college and has pre-approved a range of classes that will readily transfer over. Students that transfer from junior colleges that do not have this relationship might have some troubles with the four-year college with regard to what classes are deemed equivalent.

The juco student athlete is kind of at a disadvantage as compared to the typical juco student since non-athletes can plan their juco curriculum with a pretty good idea of where they want to complete their 4 year degree. Many universities have limits on transfer students, and further limits on transfers into specific majors. The juco athlete doesn't usually know where they will transfer to until sophomore year, so working with the school's academic advisers early and often can help avoid some pitfalls.

Son did 2 years JUCO receiving his AA. The AA transferred to the out of state D1 and he, unlike his team mates who have been there since their freshman year, is on pace to graduate on time. For him it the JUCO route worked out best educationally and athletically. There were credits from high school that went unused. 

 

GameDayToday posted:

Son did 2 years JUCO receiving his AA. The AA transferred to the out of state D1 and he, unlike his team mates who have been there since their freshman year, is on pace to graduate on time. For him it the JUCO route worked out best educationally and athletically. There were credits from high school that went unused. 

Don't forget financially.

Backstop22 posted:

I haven't seen it posted yet, but among your prime considerations should be matching up the JUCO academic side to whatever type of school your son hopes to finish at.  Not all JUCO classes meet the criteria for 4 years school admissions and a kid can get really messed up trying to sync up two years in the community college to match what a third year would have at their destination school.  That can be a big roadblock here in California if a kid did not attend a CA community college.  I heard one parent say the further away the 4 year is from the JUCO, the more likely there is to be a class credit problem.

I don't know if it is as much in the areas you are looking at but others can weigh in.

I would highly recommend checking into what credits will transfer also.  When I say transfer, I really mean, will the credits be adequate for the particular degree that your son is seeking?  Different schools have different requirements.  For instance, your son may need to complete a certain number of classes prior to being admitted to the university's business school, and in order to be accepted into the business school, he will have to earn a particular GPA in those classes.  

Transferring from a JC to another university is not ALWAYS as straight forward as some make it seem.

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