It's days like today when you see this kind of shedding of players from MiLB teams in such large dozes that make you look at this sport with different glasses on. I mean, it's obvious that 99% of these teams aren't looking to sign more players because they just themselves released some. So, my question is.....where will these players show up at this late?

 

 

"The difference between excellence and mediocrity is commitment." Twitter: @KwwJ829

Original Post

Some will go to independent leagues, some will move on and some will wait a month or two to get picked up again when someone gets hurt, more or less as a roster filler.

This is typically what you see at ther end of spring training. 

 

Last week son's former college mate was released. He was a first round pick.

 

 

 

 

Last edited by TPM

Reading some of the storylines is interesting... an organizational player of the year less than two years ago was one of the players released.

All players want to make it to the majors. I find it interesting that most players who "make it " aren't  there very long... They are up and down,rehabbing, moving team to team,then signing minor league contracts and then they are 30 and its over...... plenty of younger guys coming up

We talk about the odds of getting drafted,odds of making the show but what are the odds of getting a multi yr contract ?

Maybe the players released early are the lucky ones

Majority of organizational guys get two seasons before they get released.

 

Every senior drafted that came in with my son are all gone. Some on their own decided to pursue their careers.

 

They are all doing great and it's all good. 

Robert Stock released by Astros. He was the world beating youth player, 95mph at 15 years old, left HS early to go to USC. 

I believe part of Stock's problem is he wanted to be a catcher. My understanding is he wasn't in the top ten high school catchers in CA. Do you think he would have been better off being a stud pitcher senior year of high school and going high in the draft as a pitcher or going the Bryce Harper route as a pitcher versus the USC decision he made?

Hard to say. In retrospect, I think it is certain he would have been a very high draft pick had he finished HS and gone that route. So from a draft status, there was very little upside in going to USC. 

 

Also, when he got to USC, he was very young and some of his weaknesses were exposed in a way that might not have occurred if he was being developed in the minor leagues. 

 

As for whether he should have tried to keep catching - another hard call. With a rare arm that he had, it probably makes sense to pitch. But it seems like a 95 mph arm is not as rare now as it was even in 2008. A left handed batting catcher with a big arm is pretty rare still. 

 

I don't think, however, that there were ten California HS catchers better rated than him at the time. I saw him as a sophomore in HS and he was very impressive.

I also remember watching him Rob, very high talent, his brother played against my son in some HS games. I also can't think of a more talented catcher in SoCal at the time. His brother was talented, but nothing like Robert. With that much talent he was probably better to finish HS and take the bonus $$, but of course hindsight is 20/20. 

Originally Posted by Rob Kremer:

Robert Stock released by Astros. He was the world beating youth player, 95mph at 15 years old, left HS early to go to USC. 

Recently released by the cardinals, jeff luhnow gave him a chance with the astros. He had never made it past high A.  

The cardinals didnt need him as a catcher so they switched him to pitcher.  My understanding was that he had lost lots of velocity.  

I am sad to say IMO this should be a lesson learned for everyone.  

 

Originally Posted by TPM:
Originally Posted by Rob Kremer:

Robert Stock released by Astros. He was the world beating youth player, 95mph at 15 years old, left HS early to go to USC. 

Recently released by the cardinals, jeff luhnow gave him a chance with the astros. He had never made it past high A.  

The cardinals didnt need him as a catcher so they switched him to pitcher.  My understanding was that he had lost lots of velocity.  

I am sad to say IMO this should be a lesson learned for everyone.  

 

What would be the lesson? Some kids play for awhile and some don't.

The lesson would be listen to the experts. He was considered a top shelf pitching prospect. He was heavily advised not to take the route he chose (graduate early and play college ball). He was convinced he was a catcher and refused to listen. it cost him seversl years of development when he was highly regarded As a pitcher.

Originally Posted by RJM:

       

The lesson would be listen to the experts. He was considered a top shelf pitching prospect. He was heavily advised not to take the route he chose (graduate early and play college ball). He was convinced he was a catcher and refused to listen. it cost him seversl years of development when he was highly regarded As a pitcher.


       
Oh I see it was a pitcher and catcher dispute, I assumed they made their decision based on what they thought was best for Robert.
Originally Posted by RJM:

The lesson would be listen to the experts. He was considered a top shelf pitching prospect. He was heavily advised not to take the route he chose (graduate early and play college ball). He was convinced he was a catcher and refused to listen. it cost him seversl years of development when he was highly regarded As a pitcher.

I understand that he wasn't even happy when the cardinals made him a pitcher.  

I also didn't realize that he pitched and caught together for so many years. 

Last edited by TPM
Originally Posted by YoungGunDad:

This Robert Stock went to the Frontier League's open tryout at the end of April. Not even a week later the Pirates scooped him up and bought him from the FL team he made.

 

https://bucconation.wordpress....act-of-robert-stock/

YGD,

Robert Stock was a second round pick with milb experience and a 90+ FB.  

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