Son started to fill out the NCAA Clearing House form (received info from HS Dean) but at the end was asked to pay $90 to submit.  Is this the case for this form since I though it would be a free or nominal fee to pay to submit?  

Also, is this form absolutely necessary to fill out in order to play college baseball - even at the D3 or JuCo levels?  

Once form is filled it out does it need to updated to include additional classes/grades and test scores through graduation?

Finally, what is the purpose of the form and how is it used by colleges and for what?

Thanks.

Original Post

Burger, Yes it does need to be filled out and SAT/ACT scores need to be sent and the school sends the transcripts.  It informs the school or schools that your son is eligible to play.  I did it a few years ago and do recall paying. Just another chance for baseball to separate a man/woman from their money!

It is required and does cost.  Your child will not be allowed to participate in anything until all the checks have been clicked and approved.  Which includes final transcript and SAT/ACT score.  There is also the section yearly about professional versus amateur status.

To add, the NCAA Clearinghouse is not needed to play JuCo (NJCAA) though you might as well do so if your son may eventually play at an NCAA school.

Note - the school will not automatically send the transcripts to the clearinghouse.   You'll need to submit a request to the school to have them send the transcript.

If your son is lucky enough to get a scholarship from the school the coach will need his NCAA Clearinghouse number.

Hmmmm.... the price has indeed gone up.   It was $70 when I helped my son fill it out.

Kimb27 posted:

One more cost, I had to have his scores sent (school code 9999 on college board) and that was $12. Never ends.....

You are allowed  3 sends(I think it's 3) for free when you sign up for the SAT. If you don't do it then, then yes it's $12. We signed up at the SAT eligibility center when son was ending his freshman year. I suggest signing up as early as possible and make sure the courses you take in HS are NCAA approved. At the end of junior year they (NCAA) ) will want your transcript, your school (we have a guidance counselor that's the NCAA liaison) should send it.

The NCAA will not begin to certify you until a college requests it. The college my son is going to just last week set him to "Early Academic Qualifier"/Preliminary Qualifier. 

For what it's worth, the NAIA also has their own NAIA Eligibility Center and the cost is the same $90 ($150 for international athletes at both NCAA and NAIA).  

Also, as FoxDad said, registering with the NCAA Eligibility Center isn't required to play JUCO ball.  However, I usually recommend registering while in HS even if the athlete knows they're going to start off at a JUCO.

Knowing whether your athlete is a Qualifier, Academic Redshirt/Partial Qualifier, or Non-Qualifier will allow your athlete to know what academic requirements they'll need to satisfy while attending the JUCO in order to be eligible when they transfer to a D1 or D2 program.  (And if you're not confident that the JUCO coaches or advisers know what those NCAA academic requirements are, that's a good time to contact Informed Athlete for that detailed information.)

Prospects must be registered with the NCAA Eligibility Center before they can take an official visit to an NCAA Division I or II campus.  Almost every NCAA sport is now allowed to offer an official visit to prospects as early as the start of the junior year in high school and even earlier for Division II (June 15 after sophomore year). 

Therefore, for those prospects talented enough that they'll have an opportunity to be invited on an official visit, they should probably register shortly after the end of the sophomore year.   

Goblue33 posted:

When does the form need to be completed my son is Freshman.  Coach said donut now.  Thx

The incentive for doing it early is the potential for cost savings. Apparently, it has increased a bit in the last few years. I wouldn't doubt it will increase more over the next few years! You pay this once.

Son is a HS sophomore and was selected into the school based scholars programs which means he can start taking college courses at a fraction of college costs. He could graduate with his HS and an Associates degree... could this affect his eligibility or being recruited. Another parent said it would but I haven’t seen proof, all I can think of he would be so overloaded in college while he plays baseball (assuming he’s gets selected to play), which is his mission.

nycdad posted:

Sounds like those are dual enrollment courses? Basically credits from a near by college at a minimal cost. My son has done the same, hasn't affected anything other than it looked good to schools recruiting him.

Yes they are- dual enrollment courses. Perfect, thank you 👍

One word of warning on getting an associate degree in HS, there won't be many classes at the JUCO level.  So you eliminate that path option.  If you go to a 4 year school  your player has to transition from HS to college and jump right into non-intro level classes   it can be overwhelming for some students. 

It can be a great head start and maybe even make a masters degree possible in 4 years.  There are benefits for sure.

meads posted:
nycdad posted:

Sounds like those are dual enrollment courses? Basically credits from a near by college at a minimal cost. My son has done the same, hasn't affected anything other than it looked good to schools recruiting him.

Yes they are- dual enrollment courses. Perfect, thank you 👍

That is my understanding and my son's situation. Please don't take our situation as the norm. I'm sure you'll do further research but just wanted to add this. Good luck!

On the math not being guaranteed: most math departments require a placement test to place out of classes. This isn't a nefarious plot; it's for the kid's own good to be placed in a class where he will succeed. Math is easily measured; English/Lit proficiency a bit harder.

I'd argue  that APs have a bigger problem in being able to place out of classes. A HS class, taught by HS teachers, to HS kids, with HS study habits, and being structured to teach to the test is an illusion of a college level class. Between my two kids there were 16 AP classes. Not a single STEM related AP class covered college level material adequately. Classes at UCSD did -  and of course were far harder than any AP class - primarily because tests in college are way different than HS regurgitation type tests.

My son (athlete) described his AP classes as covering the low hanging fruit and leaving huge holes in conceptual understanding when compared to the "same" college class. The problems compounded if you used that AP 5 to skip the intro class.

Many kids (at their HA) took the HS APs because thats the "rule" to check the most rigorous curriculum box,  but took the same class once they got to college. They still had to work hard to pass. Additionally, as my oldest learned, a freshman taking an upper level class is at a huge disadvantage in mastery of the prerequisite material AND college study requirements and college tests.

IMO, believing most HS kids have acquired college level learning by virtue of AP classes is a delusion created by the admissions race. While a kid is forced into APs, don't believe he's mastered any college level material - regardless of the ultimate AP score. 

 

Can't speak for how other schools do dual enrollment, but our HS is partnered with a local college, and the college is very specific on the courses and what teachers teach it, then you need to get a certain score. After you've taken the course(s) you get an actual transcript from that college.

Goosegg posted:

On the math not being guaranteed: most math departments require a placement test to place out of classes. This isn't a nefarious plot; it's for the kid's own good to be placed in a class where he will succeed. Math is easily measured; English/Lit proficiency a bit harder.

I'd argue  that APs have a bigger problem in being able to place out of classes. A HS class, taught by HS teachers, to HS kids, with HS study habits, and being structured to teach to the test is an illusion of a college level class. Between my two kids there were 16 AP classes. Not a single STEM related AP class covered college level material adequately. Classes at UCSD did -  and of course were far harder than any AP class - primarily because tests in college are way different than HS regurgitation type tests.

My son (athlete) described his AP classes as covering the low hanging fruit and leaving huge holes in conceptual understanding when compared to the "same" college class. The problems compounded if you used that AP 5 to skip the intro class.

Many kids (at their HA) took the HS APs because thats the "rule" to check the most rigorous curriculum box,  but took the same class once they got to college. They still had to work hard to pass. Additionally, as my oldest learned, a freshman taking an upper level class is at a huge disadvantage in mastery of the prerequisite material AND college study requirements and college tests.

IMO, believing most HS kids have acquired college level learning by virtue of AP classes is a delusion created by the admissions race. While a kid is forced into APs, don't believe he's mastered any college level material - regardless of the ultimate AP score. 

 

My so did an AP class freshman year and it wasn’t until finals week they told us that unless he is planning on going that route- human Geography, it will not count. It was a good class and he learned a lot, but a waste of his time in the grand spec of things. He wants to major in Business with marketing/entrepreneurship so this is a better route for him 

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