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You always hear that the kids in the south and on the west coast have such an advantage in baseball because of the weather (compared to kids in the north).

But, has 2020 and the pandemic changed that now? Have all the California players been set back by not being able to play much at all this year?

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Well, I watched the local HS boys throwing pens in 72 degree weather yesterday here in Calif. while viewing pics of the foot of snow my brother got near Cleveland and reading my coach son's text about trying to figure out how to continue lessons at the outdoor facility in Tenn. because it is getting too cold.  So, there are still some differences.

Last edited by cabbagedad

HS and college ball players who are home in California are working out daily.  There are plenty of fields to throw and do fielding work, and if you know where to look you can find outdoor batting cages, or if your team has a facility players may have access to these cages.  Many travel organizations are going to LV or AZ to play games on weekends if they can't play here.  Where there's a will there's a way.

We got a space heater for the garage so my kid here in Wisconsin can hit off a tee in the winter

Where there is a will there’s a way

And there’s at least 2 sides of every story:  not much arm abuse in the pitchers whose season got canceled.  I would bet a lot of money that there will be at least a few pro pitchers 10 years from now, or college pitchers 5 years from now, who have some extra durability because they weren’t throwing a dozen or two outings of 100+ Pitches in 2020

Son started HS workouts yesterday subject to some pretty exacting protocols (set by the school). Masks worn at all times; equipment segregated so no one picks up another's bat, helmet, etc; players placed into cohorts with their academic year to mimic our school's approach to in-person learning, etc. He worked for 3.5 hours, safely.

Daughter (HS soph) has been working out with her club vb team for weeks now. They practice in an indoor facility with sides that opens from floor to ceiling (like a huge, converted body shop), wear masks at all times, take sanitizer breaks, have temp checks, and use color-coded balls that only stay on their court. Her practices are 3 hours/3 times a week.

They both work out at a gym with outdoor space for weights and conditioning/flexibility work 3x a week, masked up and distanced.

All of this is happening in SoCal despite the restrictions that were just imposed. None of this works if the elements don't allow it.

Last edited by OskiSD

So Cal here.  I remember when the temp used to fall to low-mid 60's.  It was not uncommon to see parkas, blankets, and portable heaters among us spectators as we sipped our coffees or hot chocolates.  We definitely knew how to prepare for those torrid CA freezing nights!!!

The first time I was in LA in high school I laughed when I saw people in ski jackets because it was 55 in January. I had flown in from Boston where a cold spell had the temperature at 0-5 for a week. I remember getting off the plane and taking off my sweater because I was sweating. I never wore a ski jacket living in Redondo. But there were winter nights in Agoura Hills it was upper 30’s.

Last edited by RJM

So Cal here.  I remember when the temp used to fall to low-mid 60's.  It was not uncommon to see parkas, blankets, and portable heaters among us spectators as we sipped our coffees or hot chocolates.  We definitely knew how to prepare for those torrid CA freezing nights!!!

Bay Area here.  my son lifts in the garage and hits tee in the front yard. Lately, he's had to put his shirt on when he works out bc it gets down into the low 60's when the sun goes down!!

@Iowamom23 posted:

Iowa. I worked out in the gym my son built during the early days of the pandemic. Fortunately, we have a day of 16 and a day of 40, so he's able to to throw outside some. And honestly, when he was in high school, they were known to practice in the snow. Made it hard to see the baseball, though.

My son's first college game, was in Snow squalls. It was at a local wood bat stadium for the Chillicothe Paints. It was a former Frontier league venue. Stilling int the stands I could not see the fild sometimes, the Squalls wer so bad. Wonered how the batters saw the balls, to hit or the fielder to catch.

I can supply pictures of his college team using snow shovels on the fooball field so they could practice on the artificial turf.

Wonderful Ohio, spring baseball.

@RJM  very true picture.  Early spring baseball around these parts is freaking cold.  I swear March is colder than Dec in the Mid-Atlantic

My kids grew up in SE PA. One year it’s 40 and windy. The next it’s 60 or 70. One year games are called for snow. Another year it doesn’t snow.

One year it snowed 18 inches. I came back from a business trip four days later. The snow was gone.

@RJM posted:

My kids grew up in SE PA. One year it’s 40 and windy. The next it’s 60 or 70. One year games are called for snow. Another year it doesn’t snow.

One year it snowed 18 inches. I came back from a business trip four days later. The snow was gone.

Son's first home series in college was in early February 2013 in Martinsville, VA.   We were about an hour away when we drove through snow flurries enroute to the stadium.   Wife sent son a text message asking if the games were still a go.   Answer - "Yes".   Temperature at game time was about 38 F with occasional light flurries.   By the middle of the 2nd game (DH) temperature was around freezing.

Junior year (2015) at WSSU, home opener (DH) is the day before the Super Bowl.   Temperature at game time in the 40's.   By the end of the first game, the sun had set and temperature plummeted.   By the end of the 2nd game it was, again, close to 32 F.  We were wrapped up in blankets and could not get warm.  Took us forever to warm up once we arrived back at the hotel.      The good thing that day was son hit a 2 RBI HR in the 6th inning of the 2nd game which proved to be the game winner.

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