scenario: 

starting pitcher-

walk, error,walk,walk,walk.

1st walk scored due to a walk. Error picked off stealing 3rd. Bases now full of walked batters with 1 out.

New pitcher comes in with bases loaded with walks and 1 out. Two hits scores all five runs. Then out of the inning.

How are the runs awarded?  Earned vs unearned.

New pitcher had no runners score that he put on base.

 

Original Post

When the first pitcher leaves, he's given up 1 earned run. Since the guy who ROE erased himself, the rest of the inning is basically like the error didn't happen. Everything was earned after that.

How did they score 5 runs without someone scoring who was put on by the 2nd pitcher? The first pitcher only faced 5 guys, and one got CS.

Disclaimer: not a scoring expert.

Not sure if this is true, but I've heard that the runs not counting occurs when the error happens with 2 outs (error would've been the 3rd out).  The reasoning behind that was the pitcher would be out of the inning so therefore doesn't count.  I would really like to know if that was true or not.

Daddycougar posted:

Not sure if this is true, but I've heard that the runs not counting occurs when the error happens with 2 outs (error would've been the 3rd out).  The reasoning behind that was the pitcher would be out of the inning so therefore doesn't count.  I would really like to know if that was true or not.

The scorers job is to reconstruct the inning with the assumption that the errors and passed balls didn't happen. That is, what scoring was the pitcher responsible for in that inning? In the example above, the error didn't impact the scoring (didn't allow any unearned runs) since the runner was picked off the bases before he was involved in any scoring (e.g. he wasn't on base when the pitcher walked a run in).

Your 2-out scenario is one way that runs are unearned, but not the only way. If the lead-off batter reaches on error, then scores under any circumstances, that run is always going to be unearned.

All of the 4 runners left on base by Pitcher #1 are earned runs charged to Pitcher #1. I assume by five runs, you mean that the first batter Pitcher #2 faced that got a hit also scored. That one is an earned run to Pitcher #2. Just reconstruct the inning (ignore the runner thrown out trying to steal because he would have been out through regular play without the error). Without the error:

BB

Out

BB

BB

BB - run scores

*new pitcher*

base hit, runs scored all earned and charged to Pitcher #1

base hit scores remaining runners LOB by P#1 plus runner put on base by P#2

P#1 - four earned runs

P#2 - one earned run

Daddycougar posted:

Not sure if this is true, but I've heard that the runs not counting occurs when the error happens with 2 outs (error would've been the 3rd out).  The reasoning behind that was the pitcher would be out of the inning so therefore doesn't count.  I would really like to know if that was true or not.

Yes, but keep in mind that a pitcher who comes in after  the error that would have been out #3 does not get that benefit. So, let's say Pitcher #1 gets two outs and then there is an error. Then he gives up five consecutive solo home runs. That' six unearned runs. He's replaced by Pitcher #2 who gives up two more home runs before getting an out to end the inning. Pitcher #2 gave up two earned runs.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×