Tagged With "Program"

Topic

Paid Baseball Coaching Position with New and Exciting Program!

Kellen ·
Attention baseball fans! I am in search of interested coaches wanting to be involved in America's Pastime with a new and exciting youth baseball organization! This is a paid position to lead a youth baseball team in practices and tournaments while...
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Re: Paid Baseball Coaching Position with New and Exciting Program!

victorleo ·
How the batting cage are beneficial for practicing the baseball? What you think? Here is http://www.slideshare.net/pitc...atting-inside-a-cage
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Re: Paid Baseball Coaching Position with New and Exciting Program!

Brian ·
I live in maryville tn. Been around baseball all my life. Coached and umpire. 40 years of age.
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Re: Paid Baseball Coaching Position with New and Exciting Program!

mdjst5 ·
I am very interested in this. I live in Pittsburgh.
Topic

Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Wesleythecacther ·
Found this free weighted baseball velocity program. What do you guys think? I will be giving it a try. It says to use 4 ounce and 6 ounce baseballs. How much of a velocity increase should be expected? http://media.hometeamsonline.com/photos/softball/MUSTANGS32/Throwing_Workouts.pdf
Topic

Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Wesleythecacther ·
Found this free weighted baseball velocity program. What do you guys think? I will be giving it a try. It says to use 4 ounce and 6 ounce baseballs. How much of a velocity increase should be expected? Also have done the exercises with dumbbells that are included and my arm feels great. http://media.hometeamsonline.com/photos/softball/MUSTANGS32/Throwing_Workouts.pdf
Topic

Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

JoeG ·
(First Post) My son, a small 2023 LHP will be starting 9th grade in a couple months at a high school with just under 1500 students. It has the smallest student population among schools in its division (CA division 2), and I am given to understand pays around a $5000 stipend to the head coach of the HS baseball program. I don't think $5000 is likely to attract a high caliber head coach who is able and willing to put in the time and effort to build a comprehensive program. I have learned from...
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Re: Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

PitchingFan ·
I don't think you will find a consensus. It depends on the coach and the time he has to devote to the program. Some are coaching multiple sports and/or have other obligations and don't have the time or see it as their job to develop offseason. Others feel it is the student's job to do it either through class or on their own. Ours is the weight lifting coach so he makes sure players sign up for his classes but it is still up to them if they do the work.
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Re: Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

Goosegg ·
Big school, small school and in-between, development is on the player. Find good personal trainers (budget allowing), physical and baseball. Sit on his academics - they will be as important to his chances as baseball. Meet with guidance counselor as early as you can get an appointment so the family can get to understand the college selection process (most rigorous cirriculum, rigorous, etc. levels and their meanings). Also, take in a few local college games so you'll can get a feel of the...
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Re: Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

JCG ·
My sons attended different NorCal Division 2 schools in the same athletic conference, so I was pretty familiar with their programs, as well as with others in our conference and in some neighboring conferences. I think you sort of answered your own question - overall, at most schools off- season conditioning is the player's responsibility. Partly because, as you note, coaches are not paid to be full-time, year round employees, and partly because usage of school gyms and weight facilities has...
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Re: Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

JoeG ·
Thanks for your reply. There is a fall ball program with practices and games, but my observation has been that the big gains in his play in recent years have come when he really gets into his calisthenics.
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Re: Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

JoeG ·
This all makes sense to me. He is 5' 3" and 105 lbs BTW so any kind of (age-appropriate) physical conditioning he does has a big impact. At age 12 1/2, when he first got into calisthenics, he worked really hard at it for about 3 months. He gained 5 pounds and his velocity went up 5 MPH. Since then he has been inconsistent with calisthenics and his gains in velocity (inconsistent) have reflected that. We would emphasize academics regardless. Neither my wife nor I grew up in sports families -...
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Re: Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

JCG ·
You imply that he's a PO, and if so, he should take a few months off from throwing each year, IMO, and fall is often the best time for that.
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Re: Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

JoeG ·
He's not a PO yet (he has a good arm in right field and does fine at 1B) but clearly pitching is his strong point and his future, so PO will happen eventually. He does take a minimum 3 months off from throwing each year - which is a big reason I'm not a fan of fall ball. I also religiously track pitch counts. An advantage of being small is that he has not been pitched excessively - that honor usually belongs to the big, early developers who throw hard.
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Re: Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

RJM ·
Over the next couple of years your son’s improvement will come from growing and corresponding strength development. Optimize his strength development with workouts. Just because the baseball program doesn’t have an offseason program doesn’t mean your son can’t develop his own with a small circle of ball playing friends.
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Re: Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

cabbagedad ·
Welcome to the posting side joeG. I coached HS for many years in Calif. until very recently. The stipend you mention is actually on the high side. It is essentially volunteer work. Your description is typical. Most fellow coaches in the arena had some depth of experience with the game, usually at the college level. Assistant coaches were more of a crapshoot. Some had extensive playing experience, some not so much - it can be hard to find those guys who will do it for free and show up...
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Re: Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

JoeG ·
Thank you very much for your perspective, cabbagedad. I really appreciate it - exactly what I was looking for. From what you describe - it sounds like our high school has a reasonable (average) baseball setup and I should express appreciation for that at every opportunity. I agree that 1500 is plenty of students from which to draw enough good athletes. Turns out that the 2023 and 2022 age cohorts in our town happen to be way above average, so our school will likely win a lot of games a...
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Re: Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

Goosegg ·
"You imply that he's a PO, and if so, he should take a few months off from throwing each year," A bit of thread drift, but I distinguished between throwing and pitching. My son threw virtually every day from the time he began rec ball all the way through college. Throwing conditioned his arm. We took time off from pitching each year (varying length). For him, long toss made his arm feel loose and strong; just always pay attention to form and be aware of fatigue (especially when young and...
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Re: Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

Smitty28 ·
Southern California puts teams into divisions based on performance, so Division 2 (2nd highest out of 7) means that the baseball team has been pretty successful, and probably made the playoffs but perhaps stopped short of a championship. I point this out to suggest that you coach probably knows how to win and may very well be high-caliber, even if he's only paid $5k per year (which I believe is typical). Perhaps he has a full-time job, or perhaps he's a teacher on a full-time salary, or...
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Re: Expectations for mid-sized HS baseball program?

CoachB25 ·
I don't coach in Ca but have never received $5,000 as a head coach. My school is 1,100. When I was the HC, my state only had 2 classes and we were one of, if not the, smallest school in our class many different years. Still, we managed to win our fair share of games and advanced our fair share in the playoffs. States differ so much. We are not allowed to have coaches set up anything other than weight room workouts. I did weight room and plyo program and we started at 6 in the morning.
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Rob T ·
Well, I would say it's an older program with some good stuff in it. I don't think it goes into enough detail about certain aspects though. Since it won't cost you anything, take a look at the Driveline 8 week program that you can get from their site. It is a little more detailed as far as a progression to follow, and has links to videos that explain the various drills. As for a velocity increase - nobody can honestly say. Some guys have big improvements quickly, some don't. Some take longer...
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

PGStaff ·
Just curious and don't have the answer, but it would be interesting to know how many Major League pitchers have once used weighted balls, either now or in the past. Knowing that would influence my thinking one way or another.
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

BOF ·
I don't know about the pro's but more and more colleges are using them. I know my son's old program has used them for years and they historically have the hardest throwers in DIII. (partially this is how they recruit) but I saw pretty dramatic improvements in their pitchers while my son was there.
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Steve A. ·
For me, the weighted baseball issue is boiled down to this: With all of the $$, research & resources available to MLB to examine the effectiveness balanced vs the risk of these programs, the vast majority have said NO to their use. Who is the target market for these programs? Developing youth players. Developing youth players will see a spike in velocity by simply existing & aging & eating Captain Crunch cereal. Add a velo program & you can measure & see results with this...
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

2017LHPscrewball ·
Do you have any scientific evidence that Captain Crunch can aid in an increase in velocity? I ate a whole lot a King Vitamin when I was a kid a saw zero increase. What about Frosted Maple Bacon Pop Tarts?
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Steve A. ·
Sorry, good point! I meant Frosted Flakes. They sponsor the LLWS & some of those kids throw gas so it must be factor.....
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Shoveit4Ks ·
Okay, i'll divulge the "Secrets to getting your son to 90+mph" PBJ, Oatmeal, Chicken Tenders, All meat covered in BBQ Sauce, waffle sandwiches (2 legos with butter) and mashed potatoes and leisure peas. Seriously, i did consider a weighted ball program once thru an instructor near Atlanta. I talked with him and we never went down that path. I think it works and players see gains....im not sure how much is retained over time?
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Matt Reiland ·
The real secret is Cinnamon Toast Crunch, but you have to drink the cinnamon-y milk left in the bowl at the end to see the most benefit. Regarding the other topic at hand, when you talk of arm conditioning, I would lean pretty heavily towards a long toss program. I don't really delve into weighted ball programs so I can't speak one way or the other on the effectiveness, but believe in the effectiveness of long toss particularly in the "arm conditioning" realm.
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Steve A. ·
Matt, Agree but am not an advocate of the "extreme long toss" programs. What is your take?
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

CmassRHPDad ·
The more folks I speak with the more skeptical I am abt weighted throwing programs _in a vacuum_. They are usually part of a greater strength, conditioning, long-toss and overall health program. I don't think that throwing a 1 oz heavier and 1oz lighter ball by itself can necessarily help you or harm you. Driveline is not just a "weighted ball program" per se. It's a carefully crafted strength and conditioning program for athletes who are already at a point in their lives when they are...
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

2017LHPscrewball ·
I know you are not supposed to promote your own business on this site, but I just came up with a foolproof idea. For the low, low price if $199 plus S&H, you can purchase my old bucket of baseballs (approx 40) that come in various weights ranging from around 6oz (probably not regulation size) up to maybe twice that (depending on when it last got rained on). This offer is only good to the first caller at which point I will begin putting together another bucket and make it available next...
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Wesleythecacther ·
Would the Driveline 8 week program work for a catcher? I am trying to improve my catching velocity.
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Rob T ·
In theory it should help anyone that throws a ball... However, the Driveline program is really tailored towards pitchers - and the mechanics they use. These aren't necessarily the same mechanics used by catchers. While arm strength is obviously part of the equation, there is a lot more that goes into effective throwing for catchers. Usually it isn't arm strength that is the issue, but time leaked in other areas - footwork, transfer, stance etc. If your goal is to simply get the ball from...
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Dominik85 ·
I definitely think the 8 week program would help Wesley. it is not catcher specific but Wesley's arm is not that strong yet judging from the videos. It is not weak but I don't think he can throw upper 80s from a crowd hop yet. BTW I would definitely use Kyle's program instead of the one posted above because of the plyo care drills.
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

joemktg ·
I only ask that you consider this as a part of the overall growth program: working with an experienced physical therapist who has a track record with baseball players. He/she can evaluate a program with you as it relates to the specific physical condition of your son. To look solely at the arm may be a mistake. More improvement may be achieved through the building and conditioning of other components in the body, e.g., loosening and building hips that are tight and weak. And the PT should be...
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Coach_TV ·
Not sure about the Driveline program, but I can tell you that this one helped my son. http://www.highlevelthrowing.c...cher-edition-e-book/
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Kyle Boddy ·
This is simply wrong. I work for 5 MLB teams and seven pitchers from one team are currently in Seattle training on the team's dime. The entirety of the Cleveland Indians' minor league teams throw weighted balls; take a look at Goodyear during Spring Training if you don't believe me. JP Hoornstra wrote about our work with the Dodgers and the results. I've worked for the Astros. You can see verified information in The Arm by Jeff Passan. Major League pitching coach Brent Strom (and his bullpen...
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Coach_TV ·
What about the Tom House Velocity Plus program - http://velocityplusarmcare.com/ Nolan Ryan and some others seem to be 100% behind this guy, is there anything to it? I'm not recommending this or anything, just asking if there is anything to it.
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Goblue33 ·
Granted my son is a 12u but his team recently did a 5 week program based on House's and his velocity went up 7 mph . The lower body worked seemed to really be the key. I think that for young kids they are using muscles that they have never used/developed before. Not sure about the older boys probably more about a few mph and arm care. The program is phenomenal for arm care. I am skeptical about the weighted ball programs but just like TCB heavy balls its something you can do in tight space.
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Golfman25 ·
This is clearly anecdotal. An academy and program in my area did it for one year. In fact they are listed on the web site. Had a big presentation. Lots of people showed up. The academy teams where going to do it as well as some other players I know. I heard there were some issues with younger kids -- personally I think they were too young for this type of program. As far as I know, it didn't stick. Haven't heard about it for a few years. It could be the cost as well. Everything is expensive...
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Steve A. ·
Last time I checked there were 30 teams. "The vast majority have said no." Learn to read.
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Steve A. ·
In addition. This is not about "your program." Frankly I don't give a rip about you or "your programs." I'm sure you have helped some people & it looks like you have. Great for you & I wish you continued success. There are countless weighted ball velocity camps & programs all over the country now. One in my area has these kids throwing 12oz weighted balls all winter long with kids as young as 9 years old. It's insane. 3 kids from this camp have been cut on prior to reaching 19...
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Matt Reiland ·
Varies by the individual. Think about it in the same terms as using 95% max weights in the weight room. There is a time and place. Someone new to long toss that doesn't have accumulated volume at "medium-long" distances shouldn't jump in and stretch it out as far as possible right off the bat. Similarly, the middle of the high school season is probably not the time to test out a new max back squat in the weight room. It's probably also not the time to be stretching long toss out to the...
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

hsbaseball101 ·
Weighted balls do seem to help with velocity gains. It's not significant, unless you consider 2-4mph significant. I'm going to have my pitchers use weighted balls again this year. They used them sparingly last year. However, my kids have to hit the weight room before going to weighted balls. I need to make sure that they have a good base of strength first. I wouldn't put a kid with no muscle tone on a weighted ball program.
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

phillyinNJ ·
2018 just started one like the OP attached in original post. Had a base of 84.6 from the OF Crowhop (not the run and gun)...will be doing it 3 times a week until the first week of December...his goal is to gain 6 on his OF throws and whatever that translates to the mound is a plus...will see how it goes.
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

TPM ·
I think that you meant eggos!
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Dominik85 ·
consider that kyle does not only do heavy and light balls but also Lifting, Long toss, band work and throwing very heavy balls of 1-4 pounds (like mike marshall). the OL UL certainly does have effects but you also would have gains if you leave the OL UL away and just do the rest of kyles program. OL UL is only a part of kyles program, I don't think kyle would recommend just doing OL UL without doing the other conditioning.
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

phillyinNJ ·
2018 does a 3 day lifting program (total body with a qtr mile sprint on treadmill) and daily band work...only thing he doesn't have is the 1-4 pound plyo
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Overthehill ·
Both of my sons are qb's. They both increased their velocity between their jr and sr years by throwing the football so much during the late summer 7 on 7 and in the fall every day during practice. I am a firm believer in the football. Plus, during football season we also have our kids lift three days a week plus lots of leg conditioning. I'm sure that also plays a huge part. I get nervous every friday night about injuries but I also have seen how much tougher my kids became after every game.
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Re: Arm Conditioning/ Velocity Program

Rob T ·
This can't possibly be true, because throwing objects heavier than a baseball causes your arm to get injured. The epidemic of ucl injuries among NFL starting quarterbacks is all the evidence you need.
 
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