It's important for a) those who are likely to go in a signing round and want to position themselves better relative to other top prospects, b) those who play in conferences that don't get as much scouting attention and want to get on more radars by performing well in a top summer league, and c) those who, because of injury or other lack of opportunity, haven't had sufficient opportunity to demonstrate their skills in college competition.

If a player chooses to work, rest, condition, study, or accept an internship instead of playing in the summer, he is least likely to affect his draft status if a) his summer opportunity is in a middle-ish as opposed to a top collegiate summer league, b) he has already had regular playing time in a mid-major or better conference, and c) he isn't expecting to be drafted early.

The other consideration, of course, is what summer activity is most likely to help the player get better: reps, rehab, or conditioning. Demonstrate pro potential the spring immediately before the draft and no one will care what you did the summer before.

What he said... 

I can just add an anectdotal from my limited view ... there is a "prospect showcase" coming up next week among some of the better summer leagues.  From what I gather, there is a decent scout turnout.  You earn that opportunity by being a top performer in a strong summer league - can be particularly valuable if you are from a school that doesn't get a whole lotta love or you didn't perform so well, for whatever reason, in the Spring.

The above comments are very accurate.  A few other things come to my mind.  It is an excellent opportunity to refine your skills.  Depending on the league you may experience higher level competition than what you previously played.  It also gives you a watered down version of what life in the minors may be.  Long bus rides, so-so lodging, fast foods, playing 6 out of 7 days a week, and more good stuff.  Son loved his experience because met new people, visited new sites, and played ball like it was supposed to be played as a kid, for enjoyment and fun.  It is tiring on the body and mind though especially after a full season.  Hopefully there is time to shut it down after summer and before fall starts up.  As was referenced above, unless it was Team USA, the Cape, or a few other top leagues, it may not be as crucial in changing draft perception.

Many decades ago, as a student at MSU, I had the option to return to the Industrial League in Adrian, Michigan or play in the Basin League in South Dakota. Then it was a long train ride to South Dakota. One year in the Basin League, 40 players later played in the MLB.

Our team had three future MLB players Ron Perranoski, Dick Howser and Howie Bedell.

Bob Gibson was one of the opposing pitchers. "his spin rate" was not a term we used. Aspirin tablet was my definition.

Morale of the story: "enjoy the experiences, they last a lifetime"!

Bob

 

 

Good perspectives so far. Here's my 2 cents from personal observations from my 2015. This is a perspective of a graduate, not a junior eligible player. I imagine that teams would look at a "gap" if he hadn't played ball in the summer. The summer after his freshman year he returned to play American Legion ball out of loyalty(model his work ethic to younger players/mentor) as the program did so much for him. His Legion HC was very influential in RipkenFanSon landing at the college where he played.

After sophomore year he played for a summer league known to have many underclassmen. Played well (high BA/steals, runs/fielding, etc). All along he was still "chasing the dream," and reading about "Alums" of this league who were drafted.  Like many he hoped to play at the Cape the next year, but was wary of the short term contacts.

After Junior year he played at a top 3 Summer league where he played virtually every day. What this league added was additional exposure . As some earlier posters mentioned, he would play against players from P5 conferences that were not on college schedule. There were scouts from a number of teams that attended games, all-star events, and set up pro style workouts at the season's end. The league also provided him with another advocate, his HC. We saw players get drafted who had really good school years OR really good summers. Timing plays into it.

 As an aside, son's summer ball decisions he'd face each year sort of turned this thread's title in reverse- summer ball's impact on job offers upon graduating. He was still juggling the dual career path probably up until 4-5 few months before the draft when he really decided to go "all in". If he wasn't drafted, he was finding himself at a real disadvantage in the job market for not having an internship (which are often in the summer). He sent out multiple resumes and didn't hear from employers who were hiring students who did OK in school, but had that "coveted internship." Fortunately for him, the dice rolled his way.

Good comments above.  My first rodeo the past summer with incoming College Sophomore.  He had a Temp Contract with a top league and all the Full Contract guys showed up.   Two games in two weeks, with 6 ABs.  Son knew the deal, he liked his experience, liked the true work commitment with his teammates, he liked the HC, the HC really liked him.....But, due to the commitment with Full Contract players he wasn't going to see the field much so Temp Contract lapsed.  It took him a few weeks to find a spot with a lesser league (rosters full, no injuries).  Over a 3 week period with the new team he's picked up 20 ABs (crowded line up with IF's), and I have ZERO clue why this Coach was willing to bring him on board.  It was a nice offering but the team doesn't have a true need for another IF.  When you're fine tuning a swing, you need a lot of reps to get your timing down for an actual game.

If we had to do this summer all over again I'd be stressing to son that he needed his college coach's help to find a league where he'll be a Full Contract guy with an understanding of how the summer HC will rotate his IF's.  Also, given the Temp Contract ending, I would have urged my son to stay home, rest, refine the swing nearby, work out, chill, hang with friends and re-approach with a vengeance in the Fall with a Now Clear Head and Rested Body.

The Temp Contract HC "apparently" really liked my son and assured him he'd be a Full Contract guy next summer.  So not necessarily a negative ending.  Stay tuned...

Perspective: Son is a D3 position player at a HA.  The Temp Contract was with the Coastal Plains League.  We also learned regardless if you could have played D1 at BS State U but opted for a stronger academic route which was D3, you are a D3 player not D2, not D1.  The Coaches of the summer leagues use that as a filter if they haven't seen you, or you weren't a conf player of the year type of guy.  Unless they saw that D3 player play and swing the bat against good pitching they're not likely to sign the D3 to a Full Contract. Had son hit balls consistently off the fence they may have converted him to Full.  But again, there's a commitment to the Full Contract players; their College Coaches can be a pipeline of players to that summer league - they expect their players to be playing. 

No complaints, more lessons learned... I spoke with son last night, he's brain dead and wanting to be home to rest.  He hasn't been home more than a week or so since Jan 10, 2019.

(Slightly off course from OP, apologies in advance.  BUT related to summer ball for college position players:  Careful  of #TEMP CONTRACTS ....)

I can't add much....

.....but my glaring thought was, if a player wants to be drafted they usually live and breathe baseball, and want to play everyday, even during the summer.  

Our experience was that the summer team/league was very important to son's draftability/status.  

(I secretly hope his college teammates that got those good internships then good jobs will be hiring at some point lol!)

 

Gov posted:

Good comments above.  My first rodeo the past summer with incoming College Sophomore.  He had a Temp Contract with a top league and all the Full Contract guys showed up.   Two games in two weeks, with 6 ABs.  Son knew the deal, he liked his experience, liked the true work commitment with his teammates, he liked the HC, the HC really liked him.....But, due to the commitment with Full Contract players he wasn't going to see the field much so Temp Contract lapsed.  It took him a few weeks to find a spot with a lesser league (rosters full, no injuries).  Over a 3 week period with the new team he's picked up 20 ABs (crowded line up with IF's), and I have ZERO clue why this Coach was willing to bring him on board.  It was a nice offering but the team doesn't have a true need for another IF.  When you're fine tuning a swing, you need a lot of reps to get your timing down for an actual game.

If we had to do this summer all over again I'd be stressing to son that he needed his college coach's help to find a league where he'll be a Full Contract guy with an understanding of how the summer HC will rotate his IF's.  Also, given the Temp Contract ending, I would have urged my son to stay home, rest, refine the swing nearby, work out, chill, hang with friends and re-approach with a vengeance in the Fall with a Now Clear Head and Rested Body.

The Temp Contract HC "apparently" really liked my son and assured him he'd be a Full Contract guy next summer.  So not necessarily a negative ending.  Stay tuned...

Perspective: Son is a D3 position player at a HA.  The Temp Contract was with the Coastal Plains League.  We also learned regardless if you could have played D1 at BS State U but opted for a stronger academic route which was D3, you are a D3 player not D2, not D1.  The Coaches of the summer leagues use that as a filter if they haven't seen you, or you weren't a conf player of the year type of guy.  Unless they saw that D3 player play and swing the bat against good pitching they're not likely to sign the D3 to a Full Contract. Had son hit balls consistently off the fence they may have converted him to Full.  But again, there's a commitment to the Full Contract players; their College Coaches can be a pipeline of players to that summer league - they expect their players to be playing. 

No complaints, more lessons learned... I spoke with son last night, he's brain dead and wanting to be home to rest.  He hasn't been home more than a week or so since Jan 10, 2019.

(Slightly off course from OP, apologies in advance.  BUT related to summer ball for college position players:  Careful  of #TEMP CONTRACTS ....)

Coastal Plains HC calls son yesterday asking him to come down for last two weeks.  Said he'd rotate him between  2B, SS, 3B and play every game.

This was the Temp Contract that ended due to the Full Contract guys all showing up.

Amazing how this can work out. 

My son , rising college Jr, was supposed to play in the Coastal Plains League this summer. He sat most of the first part of his Sophomore season this past Spring, then got an opportunity in April and took over the starting catching job for the remainder of the season.  He had a contract to play and his coach asked him to stay in the college town over the summer to lift, hit, gain weight, etc.  He felt like it was a request similar to 'optional workouts'.  The coaches 'request' was more of a directive, so he stayed.  I'm bummed b/c while the catching schedule would have been a grueling one, he missed out on live ABs and exposure to scouts going into his Jr year.  I'm trying to have faith that if he plays well this year it won't matter that he didn't play this summer, but I can't help feeling like he has potentially cost himself money (if he is lucky enough to even get drafted) and interest from Scouts. He also hasn't gotten much live AB this summer.He played college league last summer and it really helped to prepare him for Soph year.  I guess it's too late now...so I guess I'm just looking for reassurance/opinions on whether or not this was a missed opportunity? Tsk in advance.

BBALLCARES - it is really easy to second guess every step along the journey.  If he indeed did get stronger, gained weight & improved his hitting over the summer that might have been the best thing for him...

The live at bats and scout attention are great in the summer, too, of course, but a summer schedule can wear a catcher down. Probably best to trust the coaching staff.  If the school plays a competitive schedule, he'll get  seen in both the Fall & Spring...

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